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Did Penn State make the right move firing its football coach and president in the wake of a former assistant coach’s child sex abuse scandal?

Response Percent Votes
Yes
 
82% 875
No
 
17% 189
Total 1064

Comments

jhawkinsf 3 years, 1 month ago

Through all the turmoil, let's remember who the real victims are, the children who were victimized, the children who deserved to be protected, the children who have suffered all these years. Every single adult who was aware of what had been going on had an affirmative obligation to call the police, to protect current and future victims. Adults who did not perform their obligations then deserve to be ostracized now.

labmonkey 3 years, 1 month ago

Paterno seems like a scapegoat for the people who actually knew something.

I wish this whole thing would quit hijacking Sportscenter.... move it to Nancy Grace where it belongs and let me have my sports highlights when I am running 5 miles on the treadmill.

pace 3 years, 1 month ago

You boys should hold your hand over your ears and go lalalala. You sound ridiculous. Babies. You have a right to your feelings. I have a right to mine, I think you are just ridiculous, maybe you should pout while you whine.

Aileen Dingus 3 years, 1 month ago

As much as it pains me to say, it was time for Joe to go. I bleed blue and white though, so the manner in which this all came down breaks my heart. He's a good man, a man who made a mistake for sure, but he didn't deserve this.

Now- don't assume because I said that, that I condone what Sandusky did, or that I'm protecting JoePa, or that I think the victims should continue to be shunted aside. I don't for a moment forget that this all started with a heinous crime with innocent victims- and justice should be served.

I'm just sad for my alma mater, I'm sad that my idol has feet of clay.

kujayhawk 3 years, 1 month ago

Of course he knew, the graduate assistant at the time told him what he witnessed.

gatekeeper 3 years, 1 month ago

Read the grand jury indictment and then eat your words.

Frederic Gutknecht IV 3 years, 1 month ago

Just eat your words, period, BABS. "I do not know what happened..." Ignorance, in the face of evidence, is ignorant. He will always be praised for his baddass coaching, but he injected "plausible deniability" into a game of playing to win a game. He should have known and, if he didn't, he should still be held responsible. He says he knew! Get a CLUE!

rbwaa 3 years, 1 month ago

the mandate requires reporting if child abuse is suspected not if it is known --- child protective workers are the ones that determine if child abuse took place

WilburM 3 years, 1 month ago

Moreover, read the 3 pp of charges against Sandusky.

http://ujsportal.pacourts.us/DocketSheets/MDJReport.aspx?district=MDJ-49-2-01&docketNumber=MJ-49201-CR-0000636-2011

Truly serious, and disturbing even in summary form This was personal and institutional failure, and Paterno is both personally responsible and responsible as a huge cog in the PSU institution.

WilburM 3 years, 1 month ago

And for those with a stronger stomach, here's the full 23-page bill of particulars. Of course, there is the presumption of innocence, but this appears beyond awful for these children, and how many more?

http://www.attorneygeneral.gov/uploadedFiles/Press/Sandusky-Grand-Jury-Presentment.pdf

yourworstnightmare 3 years, 1 month ago

From Grand Jury testimony, it is clear that Paterno knew the gory details of Sandusky's behavior and chose to keep silent after he fulfilled his legal obligation to notify the university and nothing happened.

This is keeping silent about child abuse, folks. This is what Paterno did for almost eight years.

Maybe he fulfilled his legal obligation, but he failed miserably on his moral obligation because he did not want the heat such an investigation would bring.

Disgusting. His firing is well deserved.

yourworstnightmare 3 years, 1 month ago

And how about the Penn State students rioting over this. Do they know why he was fired?

They might want to be a bit more careful about what side they choose.

Rioting because a man was fired for keeping silent about child abuse happening in his own program. Wow.

Richard Payton 3 years, 1 month ago

Jerry Sandusky charities for youth titled second mile allowed him to be around youth for a period of ten years. What I don't understand is why Mike McQueary is still allowed to be on the sidelines. It's my understanding Mike was made an assistance coach after talking to Joe about an alleged shower between Sandusky and a young boy.

parrothead8 3 years, 1 month ago

Jerry Sandusky started The Second Mile charity for troubled youths in 1977. That's a lot more than ten years. Who knows how long this has been covered up?

Melinda Black 3 years, 1 month ago

I wholeheartedly agree. As a parent and a member of the human race, I'm gobsmacked that he did not call the police on the spot. Just thinking about it makes me want to throw-up. Witnessing it should have scarred him for life.

bevy 3 years, 1 month ago

I can't understand why the grad student who apparently was the "First" to report this didn't just take Sandusky OUT when he saw what was happening? Go in the hall and find another witness, yell for help?

The thing that makes me sick is that all the media attention is going to Paterno. Who gives a da** about their football program? I thought maybe he was getting the shaft until I heard what they said on NPR this morning. Paterno was known for checking in with his athletes' professors REPEATEDLY to ensure they were taking care of classes and grades (the athletes, not the profs.) So he can make sure Johnny Quarterback isn't flunking math, even if he has to go back 9 times to do it - but he can't follow up on a heinous allegation like this?

It doesn't make sense on so many levels. They were more concerned about their rep than the evil being perpetrated on their campus. Shame!

jaywalker 3 years, 1 month ago

Paterno's not a scapegoat, and he definitely deserves this if not worse. This devastates his legacy and lawsuits if not actual prosecution are on their way, to be sure. The behavior and actions (or lack thereof) of virtually everyone involved at PSU are inexcusable. Wilbur left a link to the grand jury transcript in this thread, if you can handle it take a look. Sandusky will spend the rest of his days in a gray-bar motel and I'm not certain that isn't where the rest of these #$%@!! belong.
Beyond disgusting.

irvan moore 3 years, 1 month ago

paterno is gonna look a lot worse when this is over

chzypoof1 3 years, 1 month ago

I love all of the supportive comments on here, without actually doing any of your own research. Just trust the crap spewed by ESPN, as they list Joe Pa's amazing stats....

I'm going to say this calmly: JOE PA admitted in Grand Jury testimony that he KNEW in 2002!!! 9 years ago!! So quit thinking about his legacy, and think about the kids. He knew, and did nothing. It is his legal responsibility to alert the authorities if a child is abused on a school campus. Look it up.

These comments just show that people will believe anything they see on tv/read on the internet. Do your own research before you spout off next time. The media is, and has always been, a controlled source for "news"

poof

Christine Pennewell Davis 3 years, 1 month ago

I understand that joe Paterno knew but to me the grad student should have kicked the Sh** out of Sandusky right then and there not waited told someone that then told someone else that then did nothing as a parent there is no way I would have just watched turned and walked away.

Christine Pennewell Davis 3 years, 1 month ago

sorry my bad that should say as a human being not just as a parent.

Kirk Larson 3 years, 1 month ago

Paterno kept working with Sandusky for nine years knowing the guy diddled little boys. He's as much an enabler as if he were the pope himself.

Amy Heeter 3 years, 1 month ago

This allegedly started in 1994: so yeah it is way past time for action and anyo.r who knew without calling police should. Be prosecuted.

Kendall Simmons 3 years, 1 month ago

No...because the DA did NOT "disappear before he had a chance to file charges". Rather, he chose not to file charges back in 1998...but he didn't go missing until 2005, which was 7 years later.

So...exactly why should we speculate what happened to him??

pace 3 years, 1 month ago

I felt sorry for Paterno, he ran a decent program and worked hard all his life. He gave his life and energy for a sport he loved. I am sure he made a lot of decision, came down on what he thought was right. I think he resisted many chances to take an easier path. His dedication to football was his priority. I think everyone felt it would hurt the program to make a fuss about the child thing. It was a very bad decision. When a teacher was found in Lawrence to have carnal relations with a 13 year old child, I saw a school board member the next day. He said the man would be prosecuted. I said he probably wouldn't. Later he wasn't, the excuse was the 13 year old was partially at fault, the family didn't want to go through a trial. The truth was and often is the school board didn't want to endure the pain of the school district being tarnished by the trial. After all they hadn't done anything wrong. They didn't want to pay for someone Else's misdeed. They were wrong, , Paterno was wrong. Sports, job, reputation, come with responsibility, not a free pass. When you take a position of responsibility it is not enough to do your job, things happen, Don't think you just need to look the other way. A lot of people thought they didn't have responsibility, one does. Paterno knew, he admits he knew, he was sorry he didn't do more. That is more responsible than stating lies, that he didn't know.

Bob Forer 3 years, 1 month ago

"i felt sorry for Paterno, he ran a decent program and worked hard all his life. He gave his life and energy for a sport he loved. I am sure he made a lot of decision, came down on what he thought was right."

Paterno's decision had nothing to do with weighing the moral issues. He was motivated by one thing, and one thing alone. And that was to protect his legacy, and save his career so he could set the all-time record for wins, which he recently did. .

Consider the context of the 1998/1999 incident and "retirement" of Jerry Sandusky. Why would a healthy, 56-year old football coach, who was regarded at that point as the best defensive coach in college football, suddenly retire? The party line, that Sandusky was upset when told he wouldn't become the next head coach at Penn State, isn't credible. If that was the sole reason that he quit, why didn't he get another elite job? He certainly could have had his choice. And if he felt resentment toward Penn State, why stay close in State College, why keep returning to the locker room and football area?

It's pretty easy to read between the lines here.

Joe Paterno knew in 1998 what Sandusky was. He (and only he would have the authority to do this) insisted that Sandusky finish out the year and "retire," presumably in exchange for Paterno's burying of the actual reason. Paterno insisted that Sandusky never return to coaching as a condition of covering up.

Given that backdrop, fast forward to Paterno's shocking failure to react sufficiently to the rape allegation in 2002. In no way could that have been a surprise to him. He had to know that the GA account was true and that Sandusky was an ongoing threat to vulnerable boys.

And at that point, Joe Paterno basically did nothing, other than taking away Sandusky's keys. Had the anal raping of a ten year in the Penn State showers in 2002 been investigated, JoePa would have been toast, and held partially responsible, as he allowed the guy to retain contact with the program after the 1998 investigation. .

Yes, there was a cover up. In fact, there were two coverups. Was it out of an ongoing sense of loyalty to a close friend? No. Did Paterno want to avoid a scandal for Penn State? Hell no. Paterno was looking out for his own self-interest, as such a scandal, if made public, would have ended his career, and ended his pursuit of the all-time win record.

It was all about looking out for number one. For a few football victories, Joe Paterno sacrificed the sanctity, innocence and future lives of countless young victims.

Shameful, absolutely shameful. And incredibly outrageous.

And now we're treated to the horrific obfuscation from Paterno that even today, he feels fooled.

I have but one thing to say: ___ you, Joe Paterno.

jaywalker 3 years, 1 month ago

Couldn't agree more. Funny how this all held 'til he got the record. So despicable. Nothing's sacred, so hard not to be cynical with things like this.

curmudgeon 3 years, 1 month ago

All one must do is consider, "what if it had been my child?" Then how would you feel? Would good old Joe be a scapegoat? I doubt it, you would want anyone who knew about it but didn't do anything to help your child be punished.

parrothead8 3 years, 1 month ago

Exactly. Would Joe have merely done all that was "legally required" of him if the 10-year-old child in the shower had been his grandson?

2002 3 years, 1 month ago

Paterno is no scapegoat. Based on the Grand Jury testimony he was involved whether he wishes he was or not. If his boss refused to do anything about it or was behind sweeping it under the rug, Paterno should have reported it to law enforcement. Actually that is what all of those that knew should have done.

The real scam is that people are trying to obscure the power that Paterno had at Penn State. He didn't really have a boss in the athletic department. He was the king and what he said would win every time. He could have threatened to leave if the school didn't deal with the situation. He didn't.

If that pig raped one boy after Paterno or the AD or the Grad Assistant knew about it, they are guilty of not stopping it.

Sandusky is sick and disgusting. So are those that support that behavior by not reporting it and those that hold rallies to support them.

pace 3 years, 1 month ago

It turns out the families of the victim wish Penn state had conferred with them. They minded the heap of publicity when the press made this all about Paterno.

seriouscat 3 years, 1 month ago

How about instead of "what if this had been my child"...think about what if this had been YOU while you were a child? Remember? We were all that helpless and powerless once, and probably will be again at some point.

Mixolydian 3 years, 1 month ago

It's a start. It was all about protecting the program. Suitable response is to drop the football program.

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