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Archive for Saturday, June 8, 2013

Letter: Sacred wetlands

June 8, 2013

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Adelv unegv Waya, a 49-year-old Cherokee, was 20-something when a doctor said he was “retarded.” At Washington University’s highly rated Brown School of Social Welfare he uses another name, Dr. David Patterson. Once he was an alcoholic high school dropout, literally “processing sewer excrement” all day.

A recent New York Times report (May 12) described Patterson’s visit to Lawrence. The story describes his tears standing behind the city sewer lift station that partially conceals the Haskell Cemetery. He was participating in a ceremony honoring the children who did not survive their boarding school experience. “These are the children of the Holocaust for us,” he said.

The Times reporter, Alan Schwarz, had it exactly right, “Haskell’s history makes it as much shrine as school.” Haskell was the flagship of our nation’s ill-conceived experiment in education for cultural extinction. Most of its sister institutions have been erased from the landscape and local memory, buried beneath golf courses, shopping centers, highways and military installations.

Patterson’s path to sobriety and success was closely tied to native spirituality and learning to honor Mother Earth. That healing process embraced his Indian heritage. After lecturing at Haskell, the Times reported, Patterson visited nearby “sacred wetlands.” Many SLT proponents deny the significance of these wetlands to Native Americans, but they played a crucial role in a memorable history of resistance and survival.

The SLT will be a black mark on this community, as indelible as the theft of the Black Hills remains today throughout Indian Country.

Comments

Bruce Bertsch 1 year, 3 months ago

Were they "sacred" when it was a corn field? They are man made wetlands and the road is being built. Time to move on.

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Ron Holzwarth 1 year, 3 months ago

Yes, they should and have, although of course the Shoah will be remembered. Although it was certainly the largest, it was only one of many hundreds or thousands of pogroms, and it was the Shoah that resulted in the reestablishment of the state of Israel in modern times.

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Ken Lassman 1 year, 3 months ago

I think the same can be said for many tribes; many are healthier and more numerous than ever before and have a better economic base than in the past. And just as with the Shoah, they are interested in remembering and honoring those who were mistreated in their past in order to acknowledge the sacrifices their people have made to be here today.

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Jeanette Kekahbah 1 year, 3 months ago

read the soil analysis - wetlands - scientifically proven/verified. was man-made into farmland which was an epic fail. time to get real.

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George_Braziller 1 year, 3 months ago

No they were natural wetlands drained for farming. What you see now is something resembling what it was supposed to be before the drainage ditches.

Crops couldn't live in the wet soil without the canals.

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killjoy 1 year, 3 months ago

No, it was natural prairie before it was farmland, not wetlands.

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George_Braziller 1 year, 3 months ago

Nope, it was wetlands. It was drained in the early 1900s.

http://www.bakeru.edu/wetlands/history

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Carol Bowen 1 year, 3 months ago

Wetlands predate the corn fields. They were and are part of the natural watershed from the top of the bluff/hill down to the Wakarusa. The corn fields were contrived.

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Fred Mertz 1 year, 3 months ago

Buck - I don't know all the details so help me out. Did the Indians own the land and then did the government take it from them to build the SLT?

Or as I gleaned from comments did the Indians sell the land and that person sell it to the government.?

If it is the latter way should the Indians have a voice?

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Jeanette Kekahbah 1 year, 3 months ago

'indians' did not sell the wetlands. the government took land from haskell and divivied it up as it saw fit. broken arrow elementary, south junior high and broken arrow park were once part of haskell too. as for how baker got the largest chunk of what was taken from haskell, well, there is a money trail and anyone who really wants to know can find it with a bit of research.

so let's please stop assuming, please start learning...and sheesh, yeah, start listening to the people you refer to as indians...and perhaps eventually the people native to this continent will be understood, valued and respected AS HUMAN BEINGS...no longer marginalized, minimized, mocked, etc.

thank you.

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Fred Mertz 1 year, 3 months ago

Well connected what did I assume? Seems to me I asked for information which you provided. The Indians didn't own the land when it was sold for the SLT.

Thanks.

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Armored_One 1 year, 3 months ago

From what I have read and seen of very old survey maps, the wetlands extended up past South junior high school. If you are going to call for the wetlands to be returned to what they were, wouldn't that mean an elementary school and a junior high school should be demo'ed, along with one of the city parks?

Oh, and the fire station that is over there, and Mary's Lake, some homes, and a few businesses.

Either you just want to gripe for the sake of griping, or you're serious and just don't have the gumption to demand those changes take place.

Or maybe you just enjoy having ready access to Douglas County Lake and Lone Star Lake, both of which would lose the majority of surface road access if the wetlands was restored to what it originally was, in terms of size.

Somehow, I expect to hear crickets chirping instead of any definite answers.

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just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 1 year, 3 months ago

The difference is that there would be nothing required other than a little paperwork to return the portion of the Haskell Wetlands south of 31st to Haskell-- no demolition of schools or park facilities or fire stations.

Care to chirp back on that?

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Liberty275 1 year, 3 months ago

We are building a highway there. We can't give it to anyone.

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Jeanette Kekahbah 1 year, 3 months ago

what are you talking about liberty?

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rtwngr 1 year, 3 months ago

@ buckjennings - The amount of time to get from the west side of Lawrence to JoCo is a piece of the argument but hardly the whole. Having the SLT will relieve congestion on 23rd street by redirecting the trucks that utilize Hwy 59, around Lawrence. Other travelers will be able to connect with I-70 easier as well. This relieves pressure on the infrastructure and lowers the traffic count as well as the propensity for traffic accidents. It is already obvious that the impact on the wetlands will be minimal and they will recover quickly with the stewardship of Baker University. As it is, 31st street is a blight on the southern corridor of Lawrence. The north side of 31st street from Louisiana to Haskell streets looks like a sewer.

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Jeanette Kekahbah 1 year, 3 months ago

rtwngr tell us how you know what a sewer looks like and thus make your claim? also please explain how that justifies the stupidity of not going south of the Wakarusa River. thank you.

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appleaday 1 year, 3 months ago

I"m not weighing in on the wetlands debate, but I read the NY Times article about this guy and learned something about Haskell's history that I didn't know:

Haskell’s history makes it as much shrine as school: a century ago, young Indians whose tribes’ land had been seized by the United States were sent there to become Christians, cut their hair and shed their traditional customs and tongues. Students who did not comply could be beaten or chained to walls in what is now Kiva Hall. Many died there from such abuse.

Here's the link to the article: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/12/us/professor-ex-addict-confronts-perils-american-indians-face.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

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Leslie Swearingen 1 year, 3 months ago

Thank you for the comment and the link. I imagine that quite a few people know little or nothing about either Haskell University or the Native Americans who live in this area let alone the rest of the country. There are over two hundred tribes so it would be a lot to learn but at least we can make an effort to know something, after all they are expected to know white literature and history and how to live in "our" culture.

This is one man who changed his life totally. I applaud him and hope for those who are still mired in troubles that they too may get out.

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tomatogrower 1 year, 3 months ago

They have a cultural center/museum. If anyone really wanted to learn something they could make an appointment to see it.

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appleaday 1 year, 3 months ago

I just learned about that the other day. I plan to go.

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Jeanette Kekahbah 1 year, 3 months ago

actually over 500 tribes. kansas is named after the tribe that lived here, Kanza, which means People Of The South Wind. thank you for sharing, Frankie8. peace~

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Liberty275 1 year, 3 months ago

They aren't building a road through the college. It's a few thousand feet to the south of Haskell.

We need the road and that is right at the north end of the Wakarusa flood plain so it can't go any further south and there is nowhere north to build it without destroying swaths of neighborhoods. While 31st night be an option, it will take a some curves to hit the bridge and miss Mary's lake and Prairie Park and cause choke points.

Haskell may be a shrine, the land behind it is not.

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Jeanette Kekahbah 1 year, 3 months ago

That land was part of Haskell. And the history cannot be constrained to the current campus property boundaries.

South of the Wakarusa is totally viable in every regard. Smarter, too. In every regard.

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Liberty275 1 year, 3 months ago

"was"

Operative word.

"South of the Wakarusa is totally viable in every regard"

Sure, lets build our new highway across a flood plain and make sure it doesn't line up with the bridge to the other side of Iowa.

At some point we are going to have big rain and I'd rather see K10 skirt the north side of the flood plain than cross it... twice. Have you ever seen the spillway at clinton dam? Ever wonder why it is so huge?

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Jeanette Kekahbah 1 year, 3 months ago

oh wow too funny you are! roflmao! "north of the floodplain" hahaha! might wanna check your facts. plus that bridge is already so deteriorated it needs rebuilding anyway. what i wonder is why common sense, truth, reality, responsibility, logic and wisdom is dammed so tight that barely a trickle runs through this community.

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Jeanette Kekahbah 1 year, 3 months ago

That land was part of Haskell. And the history cannot be constrained to the current campus property boundaries.

South of the Wakarusa is totally viable in every regard. Smarter, too. In every regard.

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tomatogrower 1 year, 3 months ago

You haven't visited Haskell lately, have you? They have changed the boarding school concept and teach Native American culture and promote it. They also teach Native Americans how to succeed in the world that exists now.

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Fred Mertz 1 year, 3 months ago

This should be a reminder for those that trust our government. Our government is capable of committing great evil against its people.

While we on the left and right fight against one another, our government, both the left and right are stealing our liberties and trashing our rights.

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Armored_One 1 year, 3 months ago

I trust my neighbor. Doesn't mean he won't snap and try to kill any or all that live in my house.

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deec 1 year, 3 months ago

Not exactly. The land grab was approved by government flunkies, who we all know ALWAYS have had the best interests of native peoples at heart.

http://www.genuinekansas.com/history_baker_wetlands_controversy_timeline_kansas.htm

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redneck 1 year, 3 months ago

I can't wait till it opens, so I can get around all the dip stick drivers in town on my way to work. I live in Lawrence and work in the east hills business park, if that makes any difference. It will also cut down the amount of traffic. I work with a lot of people from Topeka, and they have to drive through town to get to work. There are some people who want to go around this lovely city.

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Carol Bowen 1 year, 3 months ago

People who want to get around this lovely city could use I-70.

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asixbury 1 year, 3 months ago

You have to pay a toll on I-70. It is also faster and a more direct route for many jobs in the KC metro (Olathe, Lenexa, some parts of OP).

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George_Braziller 1 year, 3 months ago

Maybe they should have considered either living closer to where they work, or working closer to where they live.

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asixbury 1 year, 3 months ago

That is not always possible. In a perfect world, yes, but not in reality. Some couples work in different cities...what then? Jobs are also scarce, especially good-paying ones. My husband and I live in Lawrence. He works either in Topeka or KC, and I work in Lawrence....your response is juvenile and much too simplified.

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Liberty275 1 year, 3 months ago

If you look at the wetlands on google earth, one square behind Haskell looks dead. If that is what sacred means, we can do without it.

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George_Braziller 1 year, 3 months ago

Did you bother to check when the photo was taken? It it looks "dead" as you call it, it means it was naturally dormant. Either because it was winter or going through the usual summer heat.

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Liberty275 1 year, 3 months ago

no, it is a square of brown blight surrounded by green. You really should look at it. It's like a 200 acre scab.

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Jeanette Kekahbah 1 year, 3 months ago

hmmm Baker has sufficiently maintained the wetlands...yeah, cough, choke, gag...

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Liberty275 1 year, 3 months ago

In their defense, that is where the runoff from half of Lawrence ends up and it's full of contaminates. You need a well thought out process to keep the microbial life consuming those contaminates and breaking them down into non toxic materials. I don't know if baker engineered the property to serve that process, but given the complexity of the replacement wetlands, it looks as if it might have been a consideration there.

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Ken Lassman 1 year, 3 months ago

I can't believe you've actually set foot in either the wetlands to the east of Louisiana or the new wetlands to the west of Louisiana street. If you had, you would know how silly your observations about the Google Earth images of the wetlands are. Both areas are teeming with life day and night and serve essential habitat and ecological services to the area, and all you have to do it spend a few hours there to begin to understand this.

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Liberty275 1 year, 3 months ago

Looks pretty much dead to me. I drive by it everyday and it also stinks every now and then.

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Ken Lassman 1 year, 3 months ago

Maybe you need to get out of your car, then. Here's a note from a birder who did that this month and found 48 species in the wetlands, and the next day someone else reported 63 species in the restoration wetlands on the west side of Louisiana St. I might add that this is the tip of the biological iceberg; the birds are there for a reason: food and habitat, both of which the wetlands (both of them) have in spades. These wetlands are known far and wide for being some of the richest biologically diverse pieces of landscape in the region. Here are the notes:

Yellow-breasted Chat - 1 doing very fragmented partial songs - on west trail northern end .

Olive-sided Flycatcher 1 - working low on the north side of trail on south or Wakarusa edge of BW - along trail 100 yards east of central canal

Willow Flycatcher - 1 singing in same spot as a week ago - on the east side of BW above the canal & 200 yards or so south of were the trail on the north side of the area turns south. Both times I observed this bird it was calling from

Alder Flycatcher - 2 singing in northwest side of same trail

Least Flycatcher - 1 calling same area as the Olive-sided but south side of trail

Eastern Wood Pewee - 1 calling on the Wakarusa

GC Flycatcher - 1 calling on the Wakarusa

Eastern Phoebe - 1

L1ttle Blue heron - 4- I believe two pair - central trail in Faul Blind area

Great Egret - 3 - could see In Restoration Area from west side trail

Wood Duck - 4

Blue Grosbeak - 1 - west edge-near south end of the trail just where the woods begin - out in the morning sun

Summer Tanager - 1 - call notes

Yellow-billed Cuckoo 3- 2 calling & pair came out into bright light together - above the river along road cuts south to river middle of the south trail

Bell's Vireo - 9 singers - saw one finally in the open

Orchard Oriole 3- saw a pair together on the north-side trail

Baltimore Oriole 1 - calling

Lots of Indigo Bunting and Common Yellowthroat song. Love the harsh, and emphatic sounds of the Bell's Vireos especially when the plentiful Dickcissels and Eastern Meadowlarks are singing nearby. An early summer Kansas symphony it is.

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Liberty275 1 year, 3 months ago

It stunk yesterday when I drove by coming home from work.

"These wetlands are known far and wide for being some of the richest biologically diverse pieces"

It's also know as dead farmland with canals around it.

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Ken Lassman 1 year, 3 months ago

The wetlands have been there since the so-called Kansan ice age some 600,000 years ago, meaning that the "farmland" stage was a 75-100 year blip on the radar screen biologically and geologically speaking. If you can't see that, and the fact that it is home for literally thousands of species and performs a host of ecological services including filtering the water that flows through it for free, then you need to think about how narrow and limited your perspective is on this matter. Ask someone who works in the feedlots outside of Dodge City what that smell is and they'll reply without blinking an eye that that aroma is the fragrance of money. Biologically and ecologically speaking that aroma you catch drift of from the wetlands is the aroma of an increasingly healthy ecosystem that provides essential habitat for many migratory and permanent residents who have lived in this area far longer than you have.

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christy kennedy 1 year, 3 months ago

In other words, you know nothing other than what you think you can see from looking at a satellite photo. That's always the perfect time to take a stand on a complex and long standing issue. Bravo.

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Jeanette Kekahbah 1 year, 3 months ago

man, the lack of respect is nauseating. ignorance & arrogance are not attributes to be proud of. sad.

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Mike Ford 1 year, 3 months ago

I've spent twenty years educating myself because white schools don't tell the truth or don't bother to say anything about boarding schools like Haskell at all. The willful ignorance on here speaks volumes to this ignorance.

Before Haskell existed Christian denominations set up on every reservation as pawns of the US Government to influence the election of pro American chiefs, Christianity, and the destruction of tribal culture. Methodists set up amongst the Wyandot, Shawnee, and Kaw Nations to speed up the divide and conquer desires of the federal and state governments from the 1830's to the 1860's. The Moravian or Church of the Bretheren manipulated the Munsee or Christian Indians from the 1750's to 1900 from Pennsylvania to Ohio to Ontario, to Kansas. The Baptists split the Lenape people and the Catholics, Presbyterians, and other Baptists split the Potawatomi, Sac and Fox, Kickapoo, and Iowa, and Odawa people.

After many of these tribes were removed from Kansas in the 1860's, the boarding school concept was dreamed up by US Colonel Richard Pratt while he was working with Kiowa, Comanche, and Cheyenne POW's from the Plains Wars at Fort Marion on the Florida Atlantic coast in the 1870's. This idea was first implemented at Hampton Institute in Virginia which was an African American College with these Indians going there. Carlisle Institute was opened in 1879 in Pennsylvania with a military drill schedule to drill the Indian out of children much like Auschwitz was ran to drill the Judaism out of the people taken to concentration camps. The Indian cemeteries at Hampton and Carlisle are sizable.

Hundreds of federal Indian boarding schools were opened in the 1880's at places like Haskell, Genoa, Tomah, Pipestone, Chilocco, Riverside, Phoenix Intermountain, and Chemawa. The use of anything other than English or Christianity was made illegal by the US Government in 1886. Christian denominations ran these places with the US Government's blessing.

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Mike Ford 1 year, 3 months ago

These schools were paid for with Indian monies from that the tribes received in return for giving up lands so that many of these willfully ignorant people could have a place to live after they left Europe. The Civilization Act of March 3, 1819 stated that Indian children would be educated with teachers hired and schools on reservations built with monies made from the sale of tribal lands held in trust by the US Treasury and spent by the US Interior Dept. and appropriated by the US Congress which has plenary powers over Indian Affairs in the Commerce Clause of the US Constitution. I once found over 100 treaties where this act was cited for education of Indian children in treaties between 1820 and 1880. The Haskell wetlands were purchased in 4 parcels between the 1880's and early 1900's with INDIAN MONEY. WHITE BIA OFFICIALS decided it was in the Indian's best interests to sell the wetlands without Indian consultation in spite of Public Laws 47 and 87 in the 1950's and 1960's and a WHITE US District Court in Denver sanctified this land theft last fall. White US History is something to be sooooo proud of. Baker University has a statue of their late Art History Professor Alice Ann Callahan on their campus. Professor Callahan wrote a book about her tribe's In Lon Ska Dance in which she spoke of the cultural damages of boarding schools on Indian culture. I guess Baker University ignored that part and decided to act historically clueless and offensive anyway.

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Mike Ford 1 year, 3 months ago

Before I'm accused of Christian bashing I'm a grown son of clergy whose studied this history for two decades and I'm a Choctaw descendant. Name a denomination and I can name atrocities. Sand Creek-Methodism, California Indian missions Juniper Serra-Catholicism, Spring Green and Bear River Massacres-Mormanism. Clergy land theft Ottawa Tribe-Baptist, Christian Munsee-Church of the Bretheren/Moravianism. What beautiful American history.

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Jeanette Kekahbah 1 year, 3 months ago

to catch up to what the rest of this country knows about how mitigation of wetlands does NOT work, florida is a good place to start educating yourself on.

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Liberty275 1 year, 3 months ago

OK. I lived in Ft Myers many years and spent lots of time on alligator alley fishing the canals along the road and some of the sinkholes. In the 80s, it was beautiful from Naples to Miami. Look at the haskell wetlands on google earth then look at the everglades. Maybe then you will see the difference between wetlands and a manmade excuse.

Tell me, how much time have you spent in the Everglades?

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Liberty275 1 year, 3 months ago

Any time at all? How about at least flying over the swamp on the way to Miami?

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Liberty275 1 year, 3 months ago

"Name a denomination and I can name atrocities."

Unitarian Universalism.

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Richard Heckler 1 year, 3 months ago

There are consequences of helter skelter aimless spending, aimless growth and over saturation of the markets that usually goes unmentioned by the local media. City hall, elected officials and local profiteers are draining OUR pocketbooks and raising OUR taxes.

Cars never pay back the taxpayer and never will. This $200-$300 million tax dollar fiasco for cars and developers demonstrates this thought perfectly. Too many drivers are never happy unless taxpayers are being billed for more road work.

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Richard Heckler 1 year, 3 months ago

The community has never stopped expanding long enough to catch up with the ever expanding cost of paying for the helter skelter growth decisions. In other words Lawrence has never been in a position where new growth is paying for itself.

Unfriendly to business and homeowners. All we hear is increasing taxes more and more and more to pay for mismanagement.

Stop expanding! Take care of taxpayer owned assets! Assets going into demolition by neglect is reckless management!

There are plenty of taxpayer assets such as streets,sidewalks,water lines,sewer lines that need rehab which could create plenty of employment for five years at least. New infrastructure only adds miles and miles and miles of NEW tax dollar responsibility with no means of paying for it.

Increased water,sewer,trash,swimming pool fees etc etc etc etc are tax increases. The word tax has negative overtones so the words fee,admission,rate or whatever are used in place of the word tax aka smoke and mirrors.

Local government mismanagement has become monster disease.

Won't be long drivers will be pissing and moaning about too many trucks and too many cars on their precious SLT.

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Mike Ford 1 year, 3 months ago

liberal....really......what you miss in naivety is that some of the students who didn't survive assimilation wound up dumped in those wetlands and that road is going to discover them against many indigenous peoples wishes. this circumstance occurred with the Port Angeles Bridge Pontoon Project in Washington State on the Olympia Peninsula. The Washington Department of Transportation didn't listen after a minimal search was done on the construction site and later unearthed a whole Lower Elwha Klallam tribal village with over 350 sets of remains and thousands of artifacts. The Klallam people had to get their bones of their ancestors from a warehouse after the construction snafu. That project was abandoned after $50 to $60 million was spent. The state settled with the tribe for $6.6 million in damages. Back in 2002 and 2003 I went to Ontario and Quebec to pow wows. I went to the Osweken gathering on the Grand River Reserve near Brantford, Ontario, Canada. This reserve has Mohawk, Cayuga, Seneca, Oneida, Onandaga, Tuscarora, Tutelo, Nanticoke, and Delaware tribal citizens on it. There was an Episcopal Boarding School in Brantford next to the reserve where a museum is now located on the grounds. I went to the Brantford Woodland Centre in 2002. On this campus a number of tribal members got a hold of ground penetrating radar and discovered many sets of bones of children in the middle of the campus that were tortured by the Episcopal overseers. There is a list of hundreds of Indian boarding schools across all provinces in Canada where on campus unmarked burial sites are located where children were dumped due to death by abuse, no rx, or malnutrition. The abuses in Canada went into the 1980's. There are funds being distributed amongst survivors as I speak. These kinds of atrocities were widespread in the US until the 1930's and went on at religious boarding schools in South Dakota into the 1970's where Lakota children were taken. All of this history was repeatedly ignored by the US Corps of Engineers, KDOT, and Baker because a road and money to them is more important than respecting indigenous people and the environment.

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Jeanette Kekahbah 1 year, 3 months ago

Liberal, what shift are YOU signing on to take while the ground is dug up to ensure any bones are properly handled?

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Ron Holzwarth 1 year, 3 months ago

I have it on good authority from someone that is part Native that there really is one Native American buried in an unmarked grave somewhere in the wetlands. He died of a drug overdose, and his grave is unmarked. And to top that off, there were only two people that buried him, and they are both deceased today. So if you want to find his body, good luck.

The story went something like that, anyway.

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Mike Ford 1 year, 3 months ago

except the Indians you ignore.

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Mike Ford 1 year, 3 months ago

Read the book "Children Left Behind" by Mr. Tim Giago, esteemed National Newspaper Editor and columnist from the Sicangu Lakota Rosebud Reservation next to Pine Ridge in South Dakota. He wrote of his boarding school experience and his friends like the Cherokee man in the NY Times article who sometimes didn't survive the trauma of physical, sexual, and psychological abuse that occurred frequently at these boarding schools.

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Mike Ford 1 year, 3 months ago

Like a sheep you like many buy the certainty of the "Search?" that was done a decade ago in a small area in the wetlands. When people buy the pr they don't really have to think much do they?

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Mike Ford 1 year, 3 months ago

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Mike Ford 1 year, 3 months ago

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Mike Ford 1 year, 3 months ago

This is an article from the Brantford Expositor, a newspaper in Brantford, Ontario, Canada. It is a community of 93,650 people located just northwest of the Osweken Reserve I spoke of. Hockey great Wayne Gretzky is from there as is the late SNL Comedian Phil Hartman. Brantford is named for the Mohawk/British leader Joseph Brant. It is a couple of hours southwest of Toronto. This abuse of indigenous children went on until the 1970's and 1980's in Canada. This type of behavior was commonplace in the US in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

This is an excerpt from the Wikipedia article on Brantford, Ontario, Canada:

Numerous works address the stories of former residents of Native American boarding schools in Western New York and Canada, such as Thomas Indian School, Mohawk Institute Residential School (also known as Mohawk Manual Labour School and Mush Hole Indian Residential School) in Brantford, Southern Ontario, Haudenosaunee boarding school, and the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Carlisle, Pennsylvania; the impact of those and similar schools on their communities; and community efforts to overcome those impacts. Examples include: the film Unseen Tears: A Documentary on Boarding School Survivors,[4] Ronald James Douglas' graduate thesis titled Documenting ethnic cleansing in North America: Creating Unseen Tears,[5] and the Legacy of Hope Foundation's online media collection: "Where are the Children? Healing the Legacy of the Residential Schools".[6}

I guess the US Army Corps of Engineers, KDOT, and Baker University can plead ignorance to the sins of their culture. I guess ignoring history and cultural genocide is a luxury of American ignorance.

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cowboy 1 year, 3 months ago

You realize that everyone here was run out of somewhere else by religious persecution , famine , war. All of our ancestors have a story to tell as do the native americans. Seems the human way unfortunately. Mike Carons sacred wetlands story is tired and worn out. time to move on .

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just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 1 year, 3 months ago

The difference is that in this instance, there is nothing stopping the return of Haskell's property than a little paperwork.

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Liberty275 1 year, 3 months ago

I think a little paperwork has already been done. It failed.

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Jeanette Kekahbah 1 year, 3 months ago

well cowboy mosey on down the trail, by all means, go on ahead. follow the wagon ruts.

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Mike Ford 1 year, 3 months ago

No, Indigenous people were run out of here by yours and many other people's ancestors. Quit blaming it on no one and passing the buck of accountability on like Christian denominations have. The only people who want to move on are those who are clueless and won't face the travesties of modern decisions made by clueless and spineless people who are overwhelmed by the accounts of their culture's bad deeds. Do the right thing....abandon the 32nd Street route. Or be reminded of American sins.

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asixbury 1 year, 3 months ago

Not my ancestors. They did not come to America until much later. Stop blaming us for things we had nothing to do with. You also were not apart of the horrific things that went on, so maybe it's time for you to move on. Love is the only healing power for past sins. Also, the wetlands do not belong to Haskell legally, so they have no say in this fight.

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Liberty275 1 year, 3 months ago

LOL, we are reminded so constantly that it has become background noise.

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Mike Ford 1 year, 3 months ago

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Mike Ford 1 year, 3 months ago

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Mike Ford 1 year, 3 months ago

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Mike Ford 1 year, 3 months ago

Yes, prior to the 1930's the BIA Boarding schools here were just as bad and yes you all here in Lawrence are ignoring this and ignoring Indigenous people and not owning your culture's treatment of indigenous peoples. It is so Christian to steal lands and pave over the victims and ask the survivors to get over it. Oh the hypocracy of America.

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asixbury 1 year, 3 months ago

They are expanding the wetlands by a great deal of acreage (300 I believe) and adding an education center. They are going to make the wetlands better and more attractive to native species. This is a good thing, no?

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just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 1 year, 3 months ago

None of that has anything to do with the destruction of the existing wetlands, other than providing a fig leaf for said destruction.

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asixbury 1 year, 3 months ago

The wetlands as they exist now are not much more than stagnant, sewage water. The animals don't care if it is original or not; they only want a home. They will be displaced for a little while, but they will be better off after it is complete.

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just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 1 year, 3 months ago

Actually, animals will die as a result of this project-- lots of them. The "expansion" of the wetlands has nothing to do with a concern for wildlife. It's nothing more than a really expensive PR stunt, and for those who care more about pavement and 5 minutes of convenience than wildlife or the rights of Haskell, it works quite well.

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asixbury 1 year, 3 months ago

Animals aren't dumb..they will move when danger arises. Just like the way they moved into the wetlands, they will leave when needed. Haskell has no rights to the land, which isn't their's anyway. They lost the battle. Time to move on.

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just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 1 year, 3 months ago

All is well as long as you get what you want, I guess.

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asixbury 1 year, 3 months ago

I could honestly care less about all of this. I just like to call out illogical arguements.

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just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 1 year, 3 months ago

What's illogical about anything I have said? (And please respond with something other than unsupported assertions.)

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asixbury 1 year, 3 months ago

I should have been more specific. Your comments were not necessarily illogical. This whole debate is. This issue has been resolved. Time to move on. Beating a dead horse will get you nowhere.

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JJE007 1 year, 3 months ago

JABOTB, We don't know how many animals will die but some certainly will.

Animals will also live. Animals will get along. That's what we do.

I certainly hate when commuter convenience and "economic development" lord it over sanity and I hate new pavement...but commuters, developers and wildlife will be benefiting from this debacle.

Wildlife will benefit. That doesn't make this silliness sane, but it makes your argument a tiny bit lame. There is plenty to argue about, don't put it on the backs of the mosquito fish, blue-winged teal and dreams of crawfish frogs.

With regard to the rights of property owners and stewards, we all feel the tragedy of the commons. This will not go away. This will likely be our end, but the meek will carry on and the lords of little deaths will always rise again. There will be wildlife death, and it will forecast our own death.

In a distinct way, death rules over life. Still, the meek rule and life will continue.

All said, a good fight was mounted against the powers that be. Be happy about the expanded wetlands that you helped create. Let's honor and support the wetlands that will carry on, since there is no way to stop this project.

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Jeanette Kekahbah 1 year, 3 months ago

no. it is an artificial thing. like breast implants. may look good but ain't the same.

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Ken Lassman 1 year, 3 months ago

How can you say that 75 years of farming cancels out the fact that those soils have been wetlands for 600,000 years? Why do you think that the new restoration efforts have been so successful to the west of Louisiana street despite it being farmed even longer than the Haskell Baker wetlands? It's because once a hydric soil, always a hydric soil.

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oldbaldguy 1 year, 3 months ago

We won. Bad things happened. That's history.

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Jeanette Kekahbah 1 year, 3 months ago

we - who? won - what? maybe you're speaking about being bald and old winning for you.

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oldbaldguy 1 year, 3 months ago

take a deep breath. the europeans did overrun the continent. incredibility bad things happened. at some point we need to move on while trying not to repeat the past. my baldness runs in the family.

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Mike Ford 1 year, 3 months ago

as long as no one knows what happened elsewhere I guess Lawrence can be in it's own little bubble of historical denial.

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asixbury 1 year, 3 months ago

People know, but nobody alive today had any thing to do with what happened to the native americans. Therefore, we have nothing to feel guilty or be in denial of. It happened, it was horrific, now move on.

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just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 1 year, 3 months ago

The illegal transference of the Haskell Wetlands to Baker and other entities happened within living memory, and it could be reversed with nothing more than a filing of paperwork. Which makes you and others opposed to that complicit in a very current injustice to Native Americans.

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asixbury 1 year, 3 months ago

Why is it that Haskell only wanted the wetlands back when this construction project came up--what about all the time that lapsed before? Did they not want it then? I have nothing to do with it, and neither did any relative of mine. It sucks, but at least the wetlands will be better and more attractive to wildlife than it is now. In its current state, it's not much more than stagnant, sewage water.

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just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 1 year, 3 months ago

"Why is it that Haskell only wanted the wetlands back when this construction project came up"

Because of the construction project that would destroy them. As long as it was being restored and preserved for strictly educational purposes (as the regulations governing their transfer requires,) with equal access for all, there was no problem over who had nominal ownership. Kinda obvious, dontcha think?

"In its current state, it's not much more than stagnant, sewage water."

No, it isn't, but if the repetition of that fiction relieves you of your guilt over advocating their destruction for your five minutes of convenience....

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asixbury 1 year, 3 months ago

The wetlands are being expanded and for the first time, properly taken care of as a result of this project. That is not destruction, that is progress.

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just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 1 year, 3 months ago

You may find comfort in your assertions. Others, not so much.

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Jeanette Kekahbah 1 year, 3 months ago

oh tell us about this in detail, please explain your assertions, axis.

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asixbury 1 year, 3 months ago

What is there to explain? They are expanding the wetlands and creating an educational program...the wetlands will be better off in the long run. Short- term loss for a long-term gain. Sometimes you have to take the bad with the good. Like I've said before, this has already been decided. Move on. Choose a better cause to channel your passions; this is a lost cause.

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Armored_One 1 year, 3 months ago

An almost swamp and a road.

Amazing how the little things turn grown adults into rude little snots. Somehow, I doubt 99% of the posters on this, and similar, thread would have the same gumption to speak the words that they type.

Anonymity breeds heroism. Sadly, online it tends to be more false bravado than anything else.

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Richard Heckler 1 year, 3 months ago

Dealing with the flood water that wetlands manage on their own will become a never ending taxpayer problem. We see this around town as we speak each time a heavy rain falls.

Losing the natural habitat demonstrates how little respect so many of the human race have for other living things and a living museum.

Too many fossil fuel vehicles are never happy with the roadways and whine endlessly about traffic no matter that billions of tax $$$$$$$$ are required annually to satisfy their desires of traffic control which is an illusion. Once more retail and residential begin covering up the open space more and more and more vehicles will clog the roadway.

The vehicles will begin whining help help help I cannot deal with this traffic. Oh please taxpayers build more and more and more lanes to soothe the anxiety until the next round of traffic anxiety raises that ugly head. A sea of fossil fuel with brown air hovering above as the human eyes water up and the coughing sets in.

Not to mention this roadway is a ton of pork barrel spending for the local real estate industry which are the faces that consistently made their presence to the many hearings.... from day one.

Can taxpayers say duped again?

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oldbaldguy 1 year, 3 months ago

ditto Armored One. Perhaps did you serve in the First Armored Division?

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Jeanette Kekahbah 1 year, 3 months ago

hey pave your own boarding school. oh wait, you weren't forced to attend one.

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Jeanette Kekahbah 1 year, 3 months ago

really? how many living people would you like to hear tell you how flipping wrong you are?

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Liberty275 1 year, 3 months ago

I was forced by my parents to live in a boy's home for a few years because of the poverty we suffered. I don't know if that was a boarding school. but they fed me, sent me to their school and made me go to their church. Lots of kids ran away, but I lived a lot better there than my parents could afford.

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Jeanette Kekahbah 1 year, 3 months ago

Our Spirits Don't Speak English: Indian Boarding School by Richheape5 years ago134,798 views An excerpt from the upcoming film,"Our Spirits Don't Speak English:Indian Boarding School."

10:00
Indian Boarding School Plan by Robert Kelly5 years ago45,386 views US Government and Christians develop a joint plan to rob Indian children of their culture. "Missionaries are soldiers in disguise"

1:13:03
The Wellbriety Journey to Forgiveness by Don Coyhis2 years ago27,016 views Documentary on the Abuses of the Indian Boarding Schools. Discusses the intergenerational trauma in native communities.

4:02
Indian Boarding School Abuse by Robert Kelly5 years ago122,695 views Lakota woman Joanne Tall describes the abuse she received as a 12 year old girl in a "christian" boarding school.

9:30
Carlisle Film 0001 by Gerardo Munoz4 years ago6,839 views Presentation on the mixed legacy of American Indian Boarding Schools--done to complete a class.

3:02
Indian Boarding Schools by NPTVCHANNEL4 years ago2,220 views Boarding schools had an impact on the lives of many Indian people. Jona Ray shares with us his views about the subject.

1:13 Witness to murder at Indian Residential School

6:42 Girl Who Silenced the UN For 5 Minutes View full playlist (14 videos)

1:22
Indian Boarding Schools by HumanitiesCenter9873 years ago 9,500 views

11:39
Native American Leader Dennis Banks on Overlooked Tragedy of U.S. Indian Boarding Schools by democracynow8 months ago2,351 views

1:52
Boarding School Native American Indian Student richheape.com by buffa1o16 years ago42,854 views In 1869 the US government forced large numbers of Indian children into Boarding Schools where brainwashing techniques were ...

4:57
Kill the Indian, Save the Man by frybreadqueen20084 years ago46,474 views Quote from Richard H. Pratt, founder of the first Indian boarding school, Carlisle Indian Industrial School. This digital story is about ...

11:07
Listening to Indians--History X: Unknown Children's Graves at Carlisle Boarding School by jj005512 years ago1,133 views Between 1879 and 1970, 300000 to 500000 Native American children were taken from their families, often by force, and were ...

3:36
Clip 1 Healing the Hurt and Shame Of Native Residential Schools by TheFWII2 years ago8,347 views This dynamic and heartfelt video documents the devastating effects of the Naive Canadian and Native American Boarding ...

9:32
Interview With Residential School Survivor by xBeEmox3 years ago41,955 views

7:06
"Indian Boarding School" Interpretation (Class Project based on Louise Erdrich's poem) by S D Lunday2 years ago709 views

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Jeanette Kekahbah 1 year, 3 months ago

youtube search "boarding school indian" lists 10,900 results...the above is copied from the first page. go ahead and choose, liberty, to learn truth or to remain arrogantly erroneous.

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Jeanette Kekahbah 1 year, 3 months ago

picture from article

from the article

from the article by connected

from the article

from the article by connected

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jayhawklawrence 1 year, 3 months ago

The Holocaust is a historical reminder and serves as a warning against totalitarian regimes. It has not prevented similar events from happening. It has been useful as an educational tool to try to make the world safer.

The wetlands to me is an excuse to use events long ago to foment resentment and to leverage that resentment into a political cause for the purpose of gaining something.

In other words, it has been a useful political tool to manipulate and influence others while the arguments themselves have remained very controversial and have caused this community great time, expense and economic harm.

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Chicagojayhawk24 1 year, 3 months ago

touschkahouma - The Moravian church and Church of the Brethren are by no means related. Church of the Brethren is rooted in pacifism. Members of the Church of the Brethren have done amazing things such as forming "Brethren Volunteer Service" which was the model for the Peace Corps and founding of Heifer International. Bash on SLT all you want but do a better job researching people's religion before calling them out.

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Mike Ford 1 year, 3 months ago

The Moravian Church and the Church of the Brethren began work amongst Indigenous peoples in the early to mid 18th century amongst Cherokees in the Carolinas and Munsee, Piscataway, Conoy, and Nanticoke converts from the Chesapeake Bay area. The Munsees were converted by David Ziesberger and John Heckewelder in Pennsylvania in the 1750's. The Munsees along with other Moravian converts were located in a warzone during the American Revolution in eastern Ohio in communities like Gnadenhutten and Lichtenau. These missionaries were naïve and refused to remove these Moravian Indian converts to a safe area and 96 Moravian Indian converts were murdered in the Gnadenhutten Massacre of 1782 by a settler militia from Pennsylvania. The Moravians followed the Munsees to Fort Detroit and Fairfield Ontario near where Moraviantown was founded in 1792. The Moravians followed the Munsees to Wisconsin and Kansas where Gottlieb Oehler was part of the loss of Munsee land in Leavenworth, Kansas, along with the Atchison and Topeka railroad, land promoter and future US Senator Samuel Pomeroy and the Territorial Governor of Kansas Isaac Stevens. These three entities helped government selected Chiefs direct the session of the Leavenworth Munsee lands in 1858-1850. After the Munsees signed a treaty with the Chippewa in 1859, a Moravian or Bretheren minister named Joseph Romig showed up on the tribal reservation in Franklin County to assimilate the Indian out the Munsee people. Every time the Munsee made a treaty the Church of the Bretheren got a part of the reservation land as a kickback. This Romig person got the Munsee and Chippewa to go along with the termination of their federal recognition as Indian tribes in the 1890's so that the church would get the land. As it is now the Church of the Bretheren still holds title to the Munsee tribal cemetery as it has since 1859 even though tribal members still maintain the cemetery. This church has parasite off of the Munsee people for three centuries. Read the Enduring Indians of Kansas by Joseph Herring which lays out the historical nature of churches being tools of the US Government's assimilation plan or being out to get themselves land. Why don't you know the history of churches and Indigenous peoples in this country before you speak. You would probably be surprised to learn that William Penn's sons robbed the Delaware or Lenape Tribe of much land in Pennsylvania in the fraudulent "Walking Purchase" of 1737. So much for peaceful Quakers.

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