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Archive for Sunday, February 3, 2013

Letter: Gun strategy

February 3, 2013

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To the editor:

“Gun Free Zone.” Yet another illustration of Washington’s good intentions gone awry. These notices act as magnets for those who are looking for a place where they can kill many people, gain the notoriety they so badly need and all without fear. It has been recently written and broadcast that 18 of 19 mass killings were in schools, malls and churches. Recommendation: Replace these signs with: CAUTION: Teachers and Students May Possess Guns.”

Plus, along with remedying the above problem, three more things need to be done: 1) Any felon found possessing a weapon is given a mandatory five-year prison sentence; 2) Anyone using a gun in the commission of a crime is sentenced to a mandatory 10-year prison sentence; 3) Anyone firing a gun while committing a crime receives a mandatory 20-year sentence. Each of these is specifically without possibility of parole. Criminals’ greatest fear is being taken from their street gangs and freedom to roam our streets.

Comments

Lane Signal 1 year, 2 months ago

I can't believe it has come to this. Gun control advocates are afraid to advocate for control of anything except assault weapons. We cheer our President when he proposes an incredibly weak gun control agenda and then has to release a picture of himself shooting to placate the gun lobby. If we stay quiet about the bigger issue to get a (largely cosmetic) ban on assault weapons, we will loose sight of the larger issue. It is guns that kill people. Guns and gun culture the primary reason that guns kill thousands in the United States every year. The gun lobby uses the gun violence to instill fear in people to sell more guns. More guns drives the culture to see guns as the solution to our problems and this drives more gun violence which drives more fear and increases gun sales. We need to stop letting people arm themselves. Ban handguns, ban assault rifles. Hunting weapons can be debated, but guns designed just to kill people need to be rounded up.

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Centerville 1 year, 2 months ago

"Shoot back' is a better response than following Homeland Security's latest advice: hide or find some sissors.

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voevoda 1 year, 2 months ago

In order to implement the second paragraph of Mr. Winn's letter, we'd have to enact and rigorously enforce universal background checks for the purchase or transfer of ownership of firearms.

If the goal is to prevent the misuse of firearms by criminal, insane, and irresponsible people, then all persons who have exhibited violent behavior, with or without a firearm, ought to be banned from owning them.

As soon as someone needs to "shoot back," somebody has already been injured or killed. "Shoot back" is not a sufficient response to the problem.

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Armstrong 1 year, 2 months ago

I'm still thinking shooting back is the best policy.

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In_God_we_trust 1 year, 2 months ago

There are already more than enough laws concerning guns on the books. Laws are mainly there to keep honest people honest. More laws or stiffer laws won't fix anything, except make it more expensive for you to pay for their existence. Criminals have made the decision to not obey laws. Therefore more laws won't stop them. To stop bad behavior, you need to teach the person and enable them to be able to live legally. An improved economy, accountability to God for one's actions, and easy hiring from employers will help those in society from turning to violence and crime for their income.

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Centerville 1 year, 2 months ago

When the cry went out that the civil rights of the mentally ill demanded that they be 'deinstitutionalized', the therapy industry jumped in with both feet and promised that is the feds and state would fund Community Mental Health Centers, then they would look out for the deinstitutionalized. Their funding has gone up every year and, like clockwork, they acts like community mental health is a whole new mandate that they need more money to implement.. Truth is, they'd rather spend their time in a nice office listening to complaints that "My spouse doesn't understand me!" than going out and talking a schizophrenic living on the street into taking his meds.

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Agnostick 1 year, 2 months ago

Where are the penalties for the person(s) who knowingly sold or provided the gun(s) to the criminal(s)? When someone is killed by a drunk driver, the person who sold the last drink is held to some degree of responsibility, if applicable.

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tomatogrower 1 year, 2 months ago

Throwing all the gang bangers into prison would solve part of the problem, but what about the crazies? The bunker guy in Alabama is a prime example. He had beaten a dog to death and shot at neighbors, so there was a lot of evidence that he was losing it. The guy in Colorado had family members who suspected his mental stability. If they had reported it to the police, there is nothing they could have done. Someone who knew the mother of the guy in Connecticut had to have questioned her decision to teach a non social autistic kid how to shoot. Would gun rights supporters agree to a law that would allow the police to confiscate a person's guns when they are suspected to be nuts? They could give them back if the person passes a psych evaluation. Yes, they could go out and obtain them illegally, but if the law would allow police to regularly search these suspects, maybe they could still prevent tragedies. And there could be stiff penalties for those who maliciously turn someone in as a "crazy", so they can prevent misuse of this law.

What do you think? Might work, might not, but why don't we try and start real conversations somewhere. Although the first part of this letter writer's points made me think "another gun nut", the second part made me think, maybe he is actually brainstorming some ideas about what might work. Why don't we try and get together and brainstorm solutions, instead of spewing the dogma of ideology set in concrete? I'll bet we find more common ground than not.

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Nubrick 1 year, 2 months ago

Guns are not going anywhere. If you think talking about how terrible they are will get you out of a life or death situtation, Have at it.

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Bruce Bertsch 1 year, 2 months ago

If gun free zones are a magnet, would you please explain the UK, Canada and other countries where guns are highly controlled, yet there is little gun violence. Weapons do not deter anyone. All the nukes, drones smart bombs, etc., did not keep a few determined martyrs from flying airplanes into building in the US. The same is true with determined criminals, they don't care about your weapons, they care about whatever their goal is.

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Armstrong 1 year, 2 months ago

There are numerous laws against murder up to and including the death penalty. The problem is murderers and criminals for that matter sledom if ever pay any heed to the consequence of their actions.

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Abdu Omar 1 year, 2 months ago

There is more to the gun problem than guns and people. Yes, just look at the movies that came out this year alone. You have got Sylvester Stalone using bombs, guns, even hatchetts to kill people. Then you have the video about the killing of Osama Bin Laden. Aren't we tired of violence? I am. I am tired of these images permeating my thoughts and my imagination. I wonder how that affects a young boy's mind? Can't you imagine that this idea of killing and bloodletting is a boy's fantasy? My son, when he was young, made gun sounds and movements of fighting all the time. Now, he has children, two girls, and their worlds are different! Can't we be more like that? Laws aren't going to stop it. It has to come from good parenting and the refusal to watch these violent films and video games.

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Brock Masters 1 year, 2 months ago

I like the idea of stiff penalties for felons and others committing the crimes, but I would double your suggested jail times.

We should try to rehabilitate first time non- violent offenders, but those that intentionally commit violent crimes need to be kept out of society for as long as possible.

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