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Archive for Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Letter: Faulty arguments

April 30, 2013

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To the editor:

Two writers in Saturday’s Journal-World — in the “Saturday Column” and Marsha Goff in “Your Turn” — expressed their views regarding the proposed new Menards. At first blush, their positions appear sound and their conclusions reasonable. However, when one examines their underlying arguments, it is apparent that key parts of their positions are based on irrelevant facts or false assumptions.

The editor states that those making an investment in a new store would know more regarding its potential for success than would members of the community. So what? Their impetus is to make money; the citizens of Lawrence are concerned with protecting the character and quality of our hometown.

Goff offers another paper tiger, citing the sales tax that would be generated. Let’s do the math.  Today, Lawrence needs to buy a hammer, 20 2-by-4s, some nails, and a ladder. He can go to Ace, Home Depot or, if one is approved, Menards. Maybe someday, he can also go to Lowe’s. So what? If there are three hardware stores or a dozen, our buddy Larry is not going to buy more stuff. Net tax gain?  Zero.

I also noted the tone of disdain in the Saturday Column when it referred to “the almost-sacred downtown Lawrence area.” It is sacred, not almost; blood has been spilled there. When I travel and meet folks who have visited our town, downtown is the first thing they mention. It deserves our protection.

Comments

Bruce Bertsch 1 year, 7 months ago

Jobs that pay minimum wage and less than 40 hours a week so as to avoid being part of the ACA. It is an unfortunate part of human nature to believe that better bargains, greener grass so to speak always exist somewhere else. No one need to shop outside of Lawrence, the choose to and likely would regardless of what businesses are located here. I would rather live in a somewhat business cautious Lawrence than Olathe West.

Bruce Bertsch 1 year, 7 months ago

Actually we are better off without companies that only offer <30 hour a week minimum wage jobs.

parrothead8 1 year, 7 months ago

And so your only two possible solutions to adding jobs to Lawrence are...

BAD JOBS or NO JOBS?

Oh, I see, you like to oversimplify and ignore any other solutions.

Liberty275 1 year, 7 months ago

No job is better than a minimum wage job that is part time, right? Especially in an university town where students could use an extra $100/week.

I'd rather live in Olathe and you can bet if we didn't own a home this backwater nothing of a town would have been in our rear view mirror long ago because it is boring, barren of jobs and doesn't ever seem to get better.

rtwngr 1 year, 7 months ago

Lawrence has a reputation for being "hostile" to new businesses. This includes warehousing, manufacturing, or big box retail. Lawrence should be an area with growth. Located on I-70 and the Hwy 10 corridor to I-35 make it very attractive. So why do we fail so miserably at promoting our city? People like the author of this letter is why. Always looking for any excuse to not allow a new business or company into their "sacred" town.

Jen43 1 year, 7 months ago

fmri is correct. I to remember when the LJW praised downtown as a sacred area of town. Remember the expression "Beautiful Downtown Lawrence?" All I ever see downtown now are homeless people, drunks, druggies and psychos, not necessarily in that order. The retail consists of bars, restaurants and stores that sell KU trinkets for 10 times what they are worth.

Richard Heckler 1 year, 7 months ago

No matter what Menard's will eventually be reduced to exactly what home depot offers. Nothing more nothing less.

The Lawrence market dictates demand. Why carry more than a market demands? Any store that comes to town will will reduced to Lawrence demand because that is what the dollars dictate.

Home Depot has other stores in the KCMO metro that stock items we don't see in Lawrence. Why because the KCMO market supports that level of inventory. Same with Topeka market.

Two stores next door to each other catering to the same market will shut one down = back to one store.

30% of the Lawrence population is college students. That explains the market.

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