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Archive for Wednesday, October 24, 2012

23rd Street traffic shifted onto new bridge between Haskell and Barker avenues

Westbound traffic on 23rd Street between Haskell Avenue and Barker Avenue travels on the new bridge Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012. During construction of the bridge, 23rd Street traffic had been moved onto shoo-fly detours. Two westbound lanes and one eastbound lane are now open on the bridge. Crews soon will begin to remove the shoo-flies and complete work on frontage roads on each side of the bridge. This view is from the west end of the bridge looking east on 23rd Street toward Haskell Avenue.

Westbound traffic on 23rd Street between Haskell Avenue and Barker Avenue travels on the new bridge Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012. During construction of the bridge, 23rd Street traffic had been moved onto shoo-fly detours. Two westbound lanes and one eastbound lane are now open on the bridge. Crews soon will begin to remove the shoo-flies and complete work on frontage roads on each side of the bridge. This view is from the west end of the bridge looking east on 23rd Street toward Haskell Avenue.

October 24, 2012

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Eastbound and westbound traffic on 23rd Street — between Haskell Avenue and Barker Avenue — has been shifted onto a new bridge.

During construction of the bridge, 23rd Street traffic had been moved onto shoofly detours.

Two westbound lanes and one eastbound lane will be open on the bridge. Crews soon will begin to remove the shooflies and complete work on frontage roads on each side of the bridge.

Updated traffic information for the bridge replacement project is available at http://www.ksdot.org/topekametro/laneclose.asp.

Comments

blindrabbit 2 years, 2 months ago

Good, completed in record time. Too bad SLT has not been completed to provide relief for this bridge. My guess, traffic flow on east 23rd. will not be affected much by the bridge however.

gccs14r 2 years, 2 months ago

Traffic flow on 23rd won't be affected by completion of the SLT, either.

AirForce12 2 years, 2 months ago

not true. Everyone who lives in the right side of town, west lawrence, will be using the SLT vs the 23rd st route.

fithawk 2 years, 2 months ago

Did you really just call west Lawrence "the right side of town?" I didn't know people were still doing that.

AirForce12 2 years, 2 months ago

It was a joke... laugh a little boss. However we all know the west side the is the best side!

Jake Esau 2 years, 2 months ago

As one of the many who drives on 23rd at least 4 times a week that would use the SLT instead if it were available, it will reduce traffic.

gccs14r 2 years, 2 months ago

With only one lane each direction (you think they're going to build all four lanes at once?), you'll all be stuck driving as slowly as the slowest person on the road. And the majority of you will have to backtrack to get to the bypass, adding even more distance and more time spent on a 2-lane road. I think trying to use it during rush hour will easily double your time to cross Lawrence vs using 23rd street.

Jake Esau 2 years, 2 months ago

If I remember correctly, the new section will be 4 lanes (K-10 to Iowa). And 50mph with only one stoplight after that is better than 30mph with a ton of stoplights. And 90% of the time, you'll be going at least relatively close to the speed limit.

kuguardgrl13 2 years, 2 months ago

Doubt they will do one lane at a time. Sounds like they want to start building at the edge of the Baker Wetlands and work their way across, bringing the equipment in behind them to reduce the environmental impact and drain the wetlands where they need to be drained.

Take_a_letter_Maria 2 years, 2 months ago

Someone tell me again why we built a new bridge instead of building the road at grade. I understand why there used to be a need for a bridge, but without railroad tracks any longer I don't see the need.

Will Babbit 2 years, 2 months ago

The reason given was the walking path that replaced the railroad tracks.

average 2 years, 2 months ago

There is an actual physical dip there. Walk/bike from Learnard down to the old railbed and you'll see that the land does drop there. The alternatives were to have 23rd follow the dip down (generally not preferred by road engineers), build up an embankment, or replace the bridge. The embankment would have been somewhat cheaper than a replacement bridge, but was harder to do without shutting down 23rd entirely for a few months (something unacceptable to all parties).

DillonBarnes 2 years, 2 months ago

Not to mention the walking/biking trail that passes through there. Even if they had just built up an embankment, the path would have to be built up to reach the road, then what do you do? Put a pedestrian crossing in the middle of the road? Build up a pedestrian bridge? Not really an ideal option either way.

average 2 years, 2 months ago

The embankment would likely have been high enough for a 10-foot box culvert (tunnel), much like the SLT pedestrian trail takes currently when it passes under 6th Street out west.

Take_a_letter_Maria 2 years, 2 months ago

Thank you for the response. I was not aware of the drop in that location. That makes sense to me now.

SloMo 2 years, 2 months ago

Hey. LJW, would you please report the status of the exercise path between 19th street and the Haskell campus? Is it open now, too? I use that for my (bicycle) commute.

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