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Archive for Thursday, October 11, 2012

Letter: Differing roles

October 11, 2012

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To the editor:

Please, do not ask me to take seriously the machinations of Editor Simons regarding the function and role of public higher education. I do not questions his ability to run a newspaper, and to pursue his personal, rhetorical agendas on the opinion page, but he has “zip” credentials in the field of higher education, and lacks credibility.

I can’t imagine him being competent enough to shepherd a major university, but again, I don’t challenge his ability to run a small-town newspaper. I am convinced that the role of editor would not translate well to the role of academic leadership. His recent continuing rant about KU seems so unyielding, and he seems personally offended that the Board of Regents does not operate as he desires. Maybe building up would work better than tearing down.

Comments

atiopatioo 1 year, 6 months ago

How much money is it that has been spent on education to get America to the 47% non-productive taxpayer baseline again? Couple trillion? I think a real life, realistic small town editor could do better than producing 47% widgets.

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paulveer 1 year, 6 months ago

Mr. Daily is being rather kind. Who really believes Dolph knows how to run a newspaper?

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paulveer 1 year, 6 months ago

If the small town editor really cared about education, he would favor political candidates that take education seriously enough to fund it properly.

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jhawkinsf 1 year, 6 months ago

I read this letter and thought of the Rodney Dangerfield movie, "Back To School". I thought of the scene where the college professor was explaining how to run a business, while Dangerfield's character was explaining how the real world works as opposed to the professor's theoretical world.

K.U. is often referred to as that place up on the hill. Likewise, many college campuses are referred to as ivory towers. The implication is that they are out of touch with the realities of the real world. Yes, Mr. letter writer, perhaps the editor of a small town newspaper has zip credentials to comments on how our educational system ought to work. Then again, as our public education system seems to be failing from Kindergarden to Ph.D., I'm not sure those in the profession are any better able to solve their problems as the small town editor.

As a business owner myself, I was more inclined to agree with Mr. Dangerfield's comedic character than the arrogant professor. Of course, the best solution would be for each to listen to each other. I would encourage those in their ivory towers to listen to the editors of small town newspapers while those same editors listen to those preaching from their lofty perch.

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