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Archive for Saturday, July 28, 2012

City offers tips to cut back on trash as students move out

July 28, 2012

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Kansas University graduate Kurtis Klecan puts a final load of trash into the Dumpster on Friday behind his residence on the 900 block of Tennessee Street. Klecan said that he had already put a couch, a chair, a futon and a BMX bicycle into and around the Dumpster because it was easier to throw away than to keep.

Kansas University graduate Kurtis Klecan puts a final load of trash into the Dumpster on Friday behind his residence on the 900 block of Tennessee Street. Klecan said that he had already put a couch, a chair, a futon and a BMX bicycle into and around the Dumpster because it was easier to throw away than to keep.

City sanitation workers Justin Zimmerman, left, and Sefo Vaeono work to load a couch into the back of their truck to be crushed Friday as they sweep the alleyway between the 900 block of Tennessee and Ohio streets. Crews spent the morning removing piles of furniture and unwanted belongings as students are nearing their move-out dates.

City sanitation workers Justin Zimmerman, left, and Sefo Vaeono work to load a couch into the back of their truck to be crushed Friday as they sweep the alleyway between the 900 block of Tennessee and Ohio streets. Crews spent the morning removing piles of furniture and unwanted belongings as students are nearing their move-out dates.

Moving days are here.

With a large student population, Lawrence experiences a great migration about this time every year, with shifts in and out of apartments and homes across the city.

Student or not, though, moving’s a pain for anybody, and it produces a lot of waste. Kathy Richardson, waste reduction supervisor with the city, provided some tips for helping reduce, reuse and recycle to decrease stress — for the mover, for the trash collectors and for the planet.

• If your move purges a lot of unwanted stuff from your household collection, consider donating before binning things like clothing, books and even household goods, Richardson said. The Lawrence Public Library, 707 Vt., takes books, CDs, DVDs, tapes and records from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. weekdays (except Fridays, when it closes at 7 p.m.) and noon to 6 p.m. on weekends. For clothing and household goods, there’s a variety of donation options, including Goodwill, 2200 W. 31 St.; the Social Service League, 905 R.I., which is open Wednesday through Saturday; and The Salvation Army at 1601 W. 23rd St. Building materials and working appliances can go to Habitat for Humanity Restore, 708 Conn. Restore can arrange pickups for large items. Nonperishable food items can go to Just Food, 1000 E. 11th St.

• A simple way to reduce what you throw away in a move, Richardson said, is to use packing materials that you’re moving anyway, like towels and bedding, rather than purchased or throwaway materials.

• Nonworking electronics should be recycled rather than thrown away and can be taken to several retail stores in Lawrence. More information can be found at lawrenceks.org/wrr/index.php. Paints and other hazardous materials, Richardson said, should be properly disposed by taking them to city facilities. The city’s waste department can be reached at 832-3030.

Comments

Carol Bowen 1 year, 8 months ago

I checked with the city. Big piles of trash are assessed and charged separately. I hope the charge covers the cost.

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cheeseburger 1 year, 8 months ago

One of the ways to minimize some of the waste is to 'un-outlaw' Dumpster diving. It apparently is legal for KT Walsh and her ilk, but not for anyone else.

In a community so steeped in environmentalism to the point of needing a sustainability coordinator, one would think recycling furniture, electronics, and appliances from Dumpsters would be legal, if not encouraged.

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oneeye_wilbur 1 year, 8 months ago

Nurse RTchet is as well known as John Stavros. But the intelligentsia of Lawrence still do not know either. The city of smarts? NOT.

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Carol Bowen 1 year, 8 months ago

Who is Nurse Rachet. Could we please use her name without the attitude?

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oneeye_wilbur 1 year, 8 months ago

Face it, whether merrill likes it or not, most people just are content to set the stuff out as close to front door. The proper place to leave unwanted items is at the normal trash can or dumpster site. The problem is that the biggest item no one wants are sofas. This is problem for the sanitation dept and Defenbaugh or any other outside firm is not going to do the job that our own local sanitation dept has become very good at. Cromwell, and the other Commissioners need to ride those trucks. I remember once, that Commissioner Argersinger did and the things shaped up, but in this case, it is the commissioners who need to shape up. As far as having another facility open on moving weekends, that is hairbrained because again, those who want to recycle willl have already done so. Moving is all about moving to another clean place and leaving behind a dump. Whether it be families, students or aliens.

I have friends who were going to put a gym set , weights, etc onto the curb. The husband told me he wanted $75.00. He was too lazy to list it on cragslist. I did it for him and it was sold in two days. The wife would have put it to the curb and then it would have been sold at 12th and Haskell for scrap. Money is no object nowdays.

There may be room for trash collection changes but Cromwell and Routh or Consequences are not the answer.

Nor is charging so much for each bag , any better than a city cart. Nurse Ratchet is now running the sanitiation dept. Too bad she can't give the Commissioners and injection to control their brains about these hairbrained ideas.

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parrothead8 1 year, 8 months ago

I've had about 14 different addresses all over the country in the last decade, and this is the first place I've ever lived that lets people put almost anything out for trash pickup and charges everybody the same. I could put out a roomful of furniture and pay the same as the little old lady down the street who puts out one small bag a week. The trash policy in Lawrence is ridiculous. It's time for some changes.

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Carol Bowen 1 year, 8 months ago

The student schedule is tight. The semester ends at the same time their leases end. There's very little packing time, and students are not likely to recycle anyway. I want to know who pays To have this stuff hauled away. Hopefully, the city has an extra charge for big piles of loose trash like this.

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JackMcKee 1 year, 8 months ago

Attention Aron Cromwell:

this is why your solid waste rubber stamp committee's recommendations will never work in this town. Please refrain from making any more difficult decisions. Ever.

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budwhysir 1 year, 8 months ago

alot of people look at it this way, if you load it on the truck ya got to unload it when you get where you are going. If you leave it in the place, or on the corner you can move on out of town and let someone else worry bout it....I see stuff all over the place that people do this with.

However, they are supporting the local dumpster divers. I am amazed at some of the things I see people throw away. Just goes to show that we are living in a disposable world...

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mominlawrence 1 year, 8 months ago

could the city or some service organization or organizations offer a central location for dropping off unwanted clothes and furniture during these busy move-in/move out times? People are in a rush to get out of their current location, clean it and get in the new location and aren't going to take the time to sort clothes for one location, furniture for another and call Habitat Restore for pick up of large items. One location open for a weekend during the busy student housing transition times would be great. Those needing to drop could go there and those looking for items could stop by, thereby cutting down on waste and dumpster diving.

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Richard Heckler 1 year, 8 months ago

Good Job!

Thank you Kathy Richardson, waste reduction supervisor with the city, provided some tips for helping reduce, reuse and recycle to decrease stress — for the mover, for the trash collectors and for the planet.

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Richard Heckler 1 year, 8 months ago

OR make these people responsible for hauling away their own piles of a wasteful lifestyle and paying for the endeavor at the dump.

Otherwise taxpayers get duped each time the cost of this wasteful practice is dumped on the back of the taxpayer.

OR bill the landlords!

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