Advertisement

Archive for Friday, February 17, 2012

Elijah Johnson still learning, growing with KU

February 17, 2012

Advertisement

Great college basketball coaches know what expectations to set, how to drive players to meet them and how to convince them it’s in their selfish interests to play unselfishly.

But not everything players learn is taught by coaches. Sometimes, they learn from the example set by teammates.

Elijah Johnson, the lone Kansas starter who has not received conference player of the week honors on the only squad in Big 12 history to have four different honorees in the same season, did a nice job before Thursday’s practice of articulating what he has learned about and from teammates.

The lesson he learned about Jeff Withey, Johnson said, came early.

“One thing about Jeff,” Johnson said, “since I got here my freshman year, I’ve always played great with Jeff. Always. I’m a guard that can play real well with a big. Me and Jeff, we always connected.”

To hear Johnson tell it, there is no such thing as garbage time in a basketball game. He took the limited playing time he received very seriously.

“Even in the games we got in for the last two or three minutes a couple of years ago, I would always find him an alley-oop at least one time within those couple of minutes,” Johnson said. “I’ve always trusted Jeff. Jeff is a good player. He understands the game. He makes smart passes. He doesn’t play like he’s 7 feet, and that’s what’s unique about his game.”

Johnson had a simple explanation for why he’s a guard who can “play real well with a big.”

“I like to pass the ball,” Johnson said “I’m a good passer and to be able to throw the ball up, it’s almost like playing with Blake (Griffin). He’s just not as athletic as Blake.”

Is anybody?

“Hmmm,” Johnson said, giving it some thought. “T-Rob in a couple of years. T-Rob. I’m pulling for him.”

Thomas Robinson, like Johnson, Withey and Travis Releford, is a junior, but he has one thing in common with senior Tyshawn Taylor. They both will play in the NBA next season.

And even as a senior, Johnson will continue to learn more about himself, Withey and Releford.

“I felt like I couldn’t shoot this year,” Johnson said. “But I know I can, and everyone knows I can, but I played like I couldn’t shoot. That made me learn stuff about the game overall, instead of just settling, coming down and shooting it every time. ... Coach (Bill Self) says, ‘The shot might not fall. Do something. Do something. You’re too good to just stop at that.’ And I thought about it. I am too good to just stop at that. If my shot’s not falling, that shouldn’t reflect on my whole game.”

Johnson shared how a teammate served as a good model to follow to apply that advice.

“Being scored on, I don’t like it,” Johnson said. “I don’t like it at all. I really don’t. That’s something I think I got from Travis because no one scores on him.”

Comments

Eride 2 years, 2 months ago

EJ has so much speed. I don't understand why he has not tried to drive the ball at ALL the entire year. You have always been one of my favorite players EJ... do me a favor, drive the ball! Who knows, maybe your jump shots will start falling if you start letting yourself make higher percentage shots!

0

Gregory Newman 2 years, 2 months ago

Your game EJ is the mid-range jumper 7-14. You just need to bend those knees and punch on the gas. I believe you are faster than TT and everyone knows you jump out of the gym. Quit playing timid the ball hits your hands you act like its a hot potatoe.

At times you swing the ball to either side without looking throwing a stupid pass that gets stolen or goes out of bounds. Once you start to dribble drive expecting to score that opens up T-Rob and Withey to be unglued from double-teams then you can throw lobs but you first have to make those jumpers to gain respect.

You hit those then the three shot range becomes a made lay-up. Its not that you don't have the ability; you just won't. Come on son get nasty and if REL follows suit yaw beat Kentucky by 30

0

Commenting has been disabled for this item.