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Archive for Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Letter: Pay fors?

December 11, 2012

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It is unsettling to learn  that Gov. Brownback has coined a new phrase, “pay fors” to describe the budgetary conundrums he has created for Kansas.

Though the English language has over a million words available, he created this awkward neologism. When speaking of the consequences of decreased state revenue, are  the words “shortfalls,” “gaps” or “deficits” too negative or too  embarrassing for him to say?

This is a not a good example for Kansas students.  If they do not know or cannot find an appropriate word in their vocabulary, are they now allowed to  create and use a sentence fragment instead?  

Comments

Paul R Getto 2 years ago

Sam speaks his own language, kinda like "speaking in tongues?"

Bob Forer 2 years ago

Sam obtained the phrase while speaking to god through prayer. Proof of the encounter is attached. Notice how tightly he closes his eyes while speaking to god. Pretty intense, if you ask me.

FalseFlag 2 years ago

It is sad when some people cannot get other peoples money. Their temper tantrums could lead them to hyperventilating. Be careful some people.

Alyosha 2 years ago

Another series of nonsense words strung together to no communicative effect.

Yawn.

Bob Forer 2 years ago

"It is sad when some people cannot get other peoples money. Their temper tantrums could lead them to hyperventilating. Be careful some people"

A polite way of saying you long for the good old days of slave labor. .

tomatogrower 2 years ago

He is trying to distance himself from this disaster waiting to happen. He has already claimed that he just signed the tax bill the legislature gave him. Like he had nothing to do with it. We and God know better, Sammy.

Betty Bartholomew 2 years ago

"This is a not a good example for Kansas students. If they do not know or cannot find an appropriate word in their vocabulary, are they now allowed to create and use a sentence fragment instead?"

This second point does not seem entirely relevant to the first point. I understand that you're trying to bash the governor for both poor vocabulary and denying reality in the same letter, but the points don't juxtapose well.

Though to answer your second point, creating a phrase to describe something you don't know the word for is a good starting place for leaning the "correct" word. That's how we learn to talk, after all. It's also how language evolves. Perhaps the new phrase is a better phrase than an old phrase. If it's not, it will fall by the wayside. In any event, demanding that language stagnate because you don't like somebody's turn of phrase is a bit shortsighted.

tomatogrower 2 years ago

It makes perfect sentence. Like calling lies untruths or ignorant beliefs being defended with "I misspoke."

Richard Heckler 2 years ago

It will take years and years to clean up after Sam Brownback and Grover Norquist...

Richard Heckler 2 years ago

Kansas In The Top 10

Tuesday, July 31, 2012

Too bad for Jayhawk fans this has nothing to do with Charlie Weis' first season on the gridiron.

Also, it is the wrong Top 10. A more apt description would be that Kansas has the 9th HIGHEST combined (state and local average) sales tax rate in the country. This according to a new study from the Tax Foundation in Washington.

As KPI fiscal analyst Todd Davidson wrote in our most recent paper on tax reform,

A higher sales tax increases the cost of a product, and like any other price increase, prompts customers to purchase that product elsewhere (even across state lines) at a lower price or cut back on other purchases to offset the price increase. Either way, state retailers suffer an economic loss that impacts their employees and customers; lower profits reduce the amount available to compensate employees and/or may result in a price increase in an attempt to offset the lost income.

What does that mean in the Kansas City area where it is very easy for people to travel across state lines to make a purchase? Say you want to be ready for the upcoming football season with a new TV and you live in Wyandotte County. BestBuy.Com has a nice looking 65" Sony flatscreen TV for $2,999.98...even Energy Star rated. A purchase certainly outside of most family budgets, but you would pay an extra $62.10 in state sales tax if you purchased the TV at a Best Buy in KCK instead of going a few short miles into Missouri. Keep in mind, that is before any local sales taxes are applied.

$62 might not sound like much to someone spending $3K on a TV, but the point is obvious. Take this in the aggregate and Kansas is potentially losing a lot of sales tax revenue because the state remains uncompetitive.

In their analysis, the Tax Foundation reminds us...

Avoidance of sales tax is most likely to occur in areas where there is a significant difference between two jurisdictions' sales tax rates. Research indicates that consumers can and do leave high-tax areas to make major purchases in low-tax areas, such as from cities to suburbs. For example, strong evidence exists that Chicago-area consumers make major purchases in surrounding suburbs or online to avoid Chicago's 9.5 percent sales tax rate.

At the statewide level, businesses sometimes locate just outside the borders of high sales tax areas to avoid being subjected to their rates. The state of Delaware actually uses its state border welcome sign to remind motorists that Delaware is the "Home of Tax-Free Shopping." State and local governments should be cautious about raising rates too high relative to their neighbors because doing so will amount to less revenue than expected, or in extreme cases, revenue losses despite the higher tax rate.

Business unfriendly or what? Then add in the "secret sales taxes" as in Baur Farms and the Legends = 9%-10%...

JW1945 2 years ago

The true example of a Hypocrite: He claims to be a "Christian" by taking money away from the poor & giving it to the rich. Jesus said " It is harder for a rich man to get to heaven than it is for a camel to fit through the eye of a needle." These are God's words. What bible does he read from? Hypocrite.

Tony Kisner 2 years ago

The correct spelling is Payfers.

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