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Archive for Wednesday, August 1, 2012

Water main break forces closure of Mississippi Street at KU; Spencer museum closes

August 1, 2012, 9:46 a.m. Updated August 1, 2012, 1:28 p.m.

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A water main broke early Wednesday morning on Mississippi Street behind Dyche Hall at Kansas University causing water to seep into two bottom floors of the Spencer Museum of Art, said Joe Monaco, a KU spokesman.

“We’re evaluating the damage right now and the extent of the damage. We should know more as the day progresses,” Monaco said. “All the artwork in the building is completely intact.”

Water that flooded into the street caused a bulk of the damage on the building’s bottom floor, which houses a library, Monaco said. A smaller amount of water entered the next floor up, which is home to workshops, classrooms and a photo studio, but no major equipment was damaged. The building’s third and fourth floors, which houses artwork was not damaged, he said.

The museum is closed Wednesday as KU officials are still assessing the damage. Monaco said later the library would be closed the rest of the week, but KU officials would decide later when to reopen the rest of the museum.

KU facilities workers were in the area trying to make repairs and that Mississippi Street was closed between Memorial Drive north to the loading dock of the Kansas Union. No other buildings sustained damage, Monaco said.

Comments

mikekt 1 year, 8 months ago

if you want to see what Lawrence is up against, long term with an aging water system, do a Google search foe : Deteriorating Buried Infrastructure Management Challenges and Strategies . It is a May 2002 report from the EPA; but nothing in the reality of what is under ground in Lawrence's Water System, is, or should be, that far different from this dated information, now . They have probably come a ways since 2002, in terms of plastic potable water systems & or relining / replacement technologies for water pipes...but how they were all built, of that age, is probably similar. Many midwestern water systems were well built in, before the time of Chlorination of water arrived, in the early "19-teens". Prior to Chlorination, people drank out of wells that would get contaminated with surface runoff & diseases ( and became ill ) and used public water systems to fight fires, water animals & believe it or not, in downtown KC, water pressure was used to power early elevators. What you see from KC nightly with their water main breaks on TV right now is the coming storm for most midwestern cities' water systems, as the above mentioned report outlines . By 1912, one hundred years ago, Kansas Cities' water system was already south of Westport, The Country Club Plaza, 63re & Brookside Blvd. & well into 75th & Wornal Rd., in the Waldo Area, with "pit cast" iron pipes, that have an expected life span of 100 to 140 years of dependable use . Some of the later "engineered & cost improvements ( 1920s to 1960s ) into "how cast iron pipes were made", such as spin cast pipes, actually have an even shorter predictable life span...because while the improved construction of later pipes lead to thiner walled, lighter, more uniform strength pipes, their "spin cast" thiner pipe walls have turned out to be not so long lasting, as older "pit cast" pipes were . Who would have thought.....and have spoken out loud ? Bear in mind, metallurgy didn't really get rolling until WW2 . Nobody fully understood the faults that they would build into water main piped or the future costs to undo it all some day .1880's is a reasonable date for current modern systems to begin in with metal pipe use. And it was a great improvement over wood bound like barrel constructed pipes, with plugs driven into them into holes in the pipe that were here and there inside of pits in the ground, were these plugs could be removed pumps for fire fighting pumps to suck water out of that were powered by steam boilers on wheels....which is where fire hydrants got the nick name of "fire plugs". Back them people were overbuilding things of metal, to make them work but making them last forever, or as long as "whatever", was beyond their thought horizons or the knowledge of metallurgy to succeed at what they were doing, back then .

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mikekt 1 year, 8 months ago

yea, water flows downhill .

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a34123h9038419 1 year, 8 months ago

It was, for the record. The water flooded into the museum and has caused massive damage to the library in the basement.

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