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Letters to the Editor

Gas gouge

April 6, 2012

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To the editor:

Oil speculation certainly plays its role in the cost of a gallon of gas at the pump, but the service stations/oil companies seem to play their part. I have been following the daily market reports vs. cost of a gallon of gas at the pump and provide the following cost-per-gallon based upon a given day’s oil market result. On Feb. 15, oil traded at $101.80 and gas sold for $3.35. On March 1, oil traded at $108.84 and gas sold for $3.65. Wednesday, oil fell by $2.54 to $101.47, yet gas ROSE to $3.77.  Hey, quit gouging us!

Comments

Floyd Craig 2 years ago

and gas in lawrence is 377 while on 24 hiway east of topeka is 369 so why gouge us more then its already been done zarco is bad abotu it another is quck trip give us a break if we stopd buying gas for a few days then maybe they will drop it so thier gas wont get old yes it dose get old buying it n paying high prices n gfas it self gets old to plus how many has water in there plus how many sells the cheaper grade for high prices LOTS OF THEM DO TO MAKE EVEN MORE

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its_just_math 2 years ago

Didn't some right-wing extremist nutcase send in an LTE trying blame Obama for gas prices a while back entitled the exact same: Gas Prices

We ALL know Bush/Cheney were the culprits back then, but now that's all changed. Presidents since 2009 have no control over gas prices.

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Lynn731 2 years ago

Why do we export oil, then buy it at an inflated price from the middle east?

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dontsheep 2 years ago

Scott. I suggest you watch this short video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40hNSJ.... You'll have a much better understanding of why gas prices are rising.

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tbaker 2 years ago

The author demonstrates a fundamental lack of understanding when it comes to the petroleum markets and the refining industry. The price of crude oil is a large component of the price of gasoline. However, the spot price for crude oil on the commodity markets today has very little to do with the price of gasoline at the pump is at this moment. The inventory of crude oil that was refined into the gasoline you pump today was purchased for refining many, many months ago. The price at that time is what needs to be considered when looking at the crude oil cost component of current gasoline prices. Crude oil is in a bubble right now. There is considerable excess supply on the world oil markets, at least 10% higher than normal for this time of year. The only thing keeping the price high is the fear of disruption of future supplies should Iran take military action against shipping traffic in the Persian Gulf. This is a rational concern. The moment the markets are convinced Iran will remain peaceful and not threaten the oil tanker traffic in the Persian Gulf, the price of oil will fall a lot. This is not in Iran’s interest obviously because the current and coming sanctions are hurting them so they need to keep oil prices as high as they can for as long as they can. Their sabre rattling is making them a lot of money. They have no reason to stop it and watch the price for their #1 export fall.

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consumer1 2 years ago

How much is our gov't taxing us on each gallon of gas?

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George Lippencott 2 years ago

I wonder how long it takes a change in the cost of oil to work through the system and effect the price of gas at the pump?

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Tracy Rogers 2 years ago

The cost of oil has absolutely nothing to do with the cost of fuel that is in a service station's tank.

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Cai 2 years ago

There are many things that affect the price of gas that have nothing to do with the cost of oil. . .

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its_just_math 2 years ago

Hey Mr. Bernanke, quit printing money!

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