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Archive for Monday, October 17, 2011

First Bell: Consolidation Working Group to crunch numbers regarding transfers, demographics

October 17, 2011

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Members of the Central and East Lawrence Elementary School Consolidation Working Group requested a listing of the number of students who transfer — in and out — of all 14 elementary schools in the Lawrence school district.

Tonight, they’ll get a chance to see, review and talk about the numbers.

To see the numbers for yourself, visit this link.

Among determinations that can be made using numbers from the chart:

• Schools with the most students transferring out: Schwegler (55), Broken Arrow (50), Deerfield (49).

• Schools with fewest students transferring out: Cordley (12), Woodlawn (13), Hillcrest (18).

• Schools with most students transferring in: Hillcrest (62), Cordley (55), Pinckney (53).

• Schools with fewest students transferring in: Sunflower (13), Kennedy (14), Deerfield and Woodlawn (21 each).

• Schools where students transferring in make up the largest percentage of the overall student body: Pinckney (22.9), Cordley (18.7), Hillcrest (17.4).

Members of the working group are meeting to determine how to consolidate a list of six schools into three or four within the next two to three years. The task force’s recommendations are due to members of the Lawrence school board by the end of January.

Here’s how the schools being considered for consolidation rank in terms of transfers:

• Most students transferring out: Kennedy (42), Pinckney (32), New York and Sunset Hill (28 each), Hillcrest (18), Cordley (12).

• Most students transferring in: Hillcrest (62), Cordley (55), Pinckney (53), Sunset Hill (32), New York (27), Kennedy (14).

• Schools where students transferring in make up the largest percentage of the overall student body: Pinckney (22.9), Cordley (18.7), Hillcrest (17.4), New York (14.8), Sunset Hill (12.4), Kennedy (6.3).

Requested transfers are not automatic. Here’s an excerpt from the district’s request form for elementary students:

“At the elementary level, parents may request a transfer to an alternate school for three reasons: (1) school preference, (2) residential relocation, or for (3) documented legal, health, or emergency situations. (With regard to school preference, applications at the elementary or secondary level (K-9) will not be considered if it would increase a projected class size beyond the district’s class size standard.)”

The working group meeting runs from 7 to 9 tonight at district headquarters, 110 McDonald Drive.

•••

Also headed to the working group will be some demographic data.

Among the numbers set for discussion and consideration tonight:

• 62.8 percent of students at Hillcrest School are enrolled in the district’s ESL program, which is for students studying English as a second language. At Cordley School, 28.2 percent of students are in the ESL program. Pinckney has 5.4 percent; Kennedy School has 5 percent; Sunset Hill School has 4.8 percent; and New York School, has 1.7 percent.

• 73 percent of students at New York School qualify for free- (64.8 percent) or reduced-price (8.2 percent) lunches; 69.8 percent of students at Kennedy qualify for free- (57.3 percent) or reduced-price (11.9 percent) lunches; 57.5 percent of Pinckney students qualify for free- (49.1 percent) or reduced-price (8.4 percent) lunches; 57.1 percent of Hillcrest students qualify for free- (45 percent) or reduced-price (12.1 percent) lunches; 42.9 percent of Cordley students qualify for free- (34.8 percent) or reduced-price (8.1 percent) lunches; 42.7 percent of Sunset Hill students qualify for free- (37.7 percent) or reduced-price (5 percent) lunches.

To see charts including this and other information requested by members of the group, visit the working group page on the district’s website, USD497.org.

Comments

Kookamooka 2 years, 6 months ago

and building bigger, newer schools costs a ton of money that they will need to ask taxpayers for. In a community of students and elderly, there is little hope for a bond issue to pass. This consolidation is a pipe dream for the administration and developers. If the developers can foot the whole bill, great....give and take.

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LadyJ 2 years, 6 months ago

Out of curiosity, if they combine say Cordley and Pickney, where would this school be built? Same with Kennedy and New York, where would it be built? You're talking about areas that are fully developed.

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