Letters to the Editor

Personal matters

November 7, 2011

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To the editor:

My recent letter, “Modesty issue,” received a variety of responses. This week, our evening conversation began, “Why are so many things in our society throwaway?” The answer came from a young fellow in a different context as I watched him fix his lawn mower in my garage.

“No one wants to ask a question anymore,” was his intuitive reply. He and I left it there; you and I take it up here.

As stated in my previous letter, young children aren’t ready for private information that’s fed them in classrooms. The result is we silence children. They develop a tendency to not ask questions because they’re afraid of information when private information is addressed in a public, intimidating setting.

Parents are the ones to determine, with God’s help, the appropriate time and place to instruct their children about personal issues. When schools take it upon themselves to offer this instruction, they treat every case as identical. That’s not how God made us.

Perhaps my previous letter gave you, as adults, too much information, also. I received a knee-jerk reaction, overall. Perhaps my letter solicited unfounded fears. That’s disturbing. If you’re a parent, addressing this information at the appropriate time is a privilege and not something to be feared.

I’m tired of a throwaway society. Last century, we went from horses and carriages to a man on the moon.

This century?

Comments

Getaroom 3 years, 9 months ago

With God's help eh? Lawn mower repair parables aside, nice way to dodge the extreme discomfort you show when the subject of "sensitive subjects" come up at school with children. Maybe you choose to intentionally embark on such subjects with your children when you see fit, but there a literally millions of children who never have that conversation at all in the home, or with a parent. Had a need not been seen long ago by educators, many of whom are also parents, such subjects would have never have arrived on the scene. Your religious conservatism is driving your ideology here and has little to do with the need for this conversation to be available among the larger population as it concerns grade school aged children. It is fine for you to have your opinion at any rate, but do not act like you know what is best for all children. You clearly do not and your issues are mainly religious dogma driven. Home school is probably more to your liking, control and religious propaganda are easier to instill when you cloister your children within the church belief system and keep them from everyday socialization with a broad range of kids and their backgrounds.

jafs 3 years, 9 months ago

What do you think should be done about it?

Kendall Simmons 3 years, 9 months ago

I'm still trying to figure out how on earth Ms. Steward determined that "young children aren’t ready for private information that’s fed them in classrooms. The result is we silence children. They develop a tendency to not ask questions because they’re afraid of information when private information is addressed in a public, intimidating setting."

Who the heck is she talking about??? Certainly not kids. (Perhaps not having any of her own is part of the problem?)

Kids are curious and tend to ask questions constantly. And, yes, they ask questions about "immodest" stuff. They want to know about perfectly natural things. And it's perfectly natural to want to know about those things and to ask about them. And to expect answers.

No, a 3 year old who asks where babies come from doesn't need a biology lesson, but they shouldn't be told "the stork" either. "Mommy's tummy" is good enough for a 3 year old.

But it's certainly not good enough for a 9 year old...and Ms Steward was previously upset that 9 year olds were learning about menstruation and anatomy in school. Considering that every student has "private parts" and American girls start their period between the ages of 8 and 15, parents should already have been talking with their kids.

Frankly, treating perfectly natural bodily functions and body parts as though they're dirty and should never be mentioned in public...or only referred to with euphemisms...is not a helpful, healthy approach. It’s not modesty. It’s prudishness. And it’s certainly not the way to raise kids.

As an aside, I reread her original letter (10/5) and the forum responses. Based on her “Perhaps my previous letter gave you, as adults, too much information…I also received a knee-jerk reaction, overall. Perhaps my letter solicited unfounded fears”, I was expecting to read a lot of immature or nasty comments.

Upon reading them, though, I was actually very impressed at how seriously posters addressed the subject. As a result, I think the only person with the knee-jerk response was her.

Bob Forer 3 years, 9 months ago

Apparently Julie hasn't been taught about the "Rule of the Hole."' When you find yourself in a hole, stop digging. In all frankness, Julie, your second attempt didn't even come close to bailing you out. You should have chalked the first letter up to experience, and walked away.

One final note. You've heard the expression "third time's the charm." Sorry, but not in your case, honey.

meggers 3 years, 9 months ago

And the award for the most non-sequiturs in a single LTE goes to Julie!

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