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Archive for Thursday, July 21, 2011

Hemenway fully retired from KU, no longer on payroll

July 21, 2011

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Two years after the Kansas Board of Regents reached an agreement with three outgoing university chief executives, retired Kansas University Chancellor Robert Hemenway has fully retired from the university and is no longer on the payroll, university officials confirmed.

Two other retired university leaders, however, are still drawing salaries from their institutions, as laid out in a 2009 regents memo.

After all three retired in 2009, they each took a one-year sabbatical for the 2009-10 school year. Hemenway returned for the 2010-11 school year to teach and to write a book, under stipulations in the memo.

Hemenway returned as a full professor of English and taught one class in the fall 2010 and spring 2011 semesters, American Studies 344, Topic: Sport and Higher Education. He was paid for the 2009-10 and 2010-11 school years at $340,352, the same salary he received in the last year he was chancellor. Of that salary, $120,000 came from public funds, and the remainder was paid by the KU Endowment Association.

Hemenway is now fully retired and doesn’t receive a salary, said Jack Martin, a KU spokesman. He also no longer receives the four tickets to KU athletics events he received during the last two school years, nor is he assigned a graduate research assistant to assist with his book project.

Hemenway will still have access to a campus office, which is in the Hall Center for the Humanities building, Martin said. Del Shankel, KU’s 15th chancellor, also has use of an office on campus.

Retired Pittsburg State University President Tom Bryant is working half-time as a professor in the College of Education and making $43,425, an administrative assistant to the president at the university said. Retired Kansas State President Jon Wefald is making $157,982 per year as a half-time professor in the university’s School of Leadership Studies, a Kansas State spokeswoman said.

Both entered a phased retirement program after their one-year sabbaticals that can last for up to five years, by mutual agreement with their universities.

Bryant and Wefald are also no longer receiving athletics tickets, as outlined in the regents’ memo.

Comments

tkmoore 2 years, 9 months ago

I have a idea STOP ALL STATE FUNDING make them find a way to pay this stuff.

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tkmoore 2 years, 9 months ago

Well spent tax payers money NOT!!!!!!!!!

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Tony Kisner 2 years, 9 months ago

Much like severance packages in Fortune 500 companies. If you don't make it attractive to get fired from the company or school who are you ever going to find to work for $350K a year? Simple stuff folks.

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Scott Morgan 2 years, 9 months ago

I predict in a hundred years or so economic historians look back at the failure of the U.S.A. system they will focus on leaches like for a small example Hemingway and Jon Wefald. Make no mistake the nation is full of these thieves. Why government staff assistants in Topeka or Washington feel they need to earn 5 times the average worker is beyond me. Why an assistant principal expects pay over 100k in a low pay town, why a guy or gal running a snow plow who works odd hours expects to make twice as much as a beginning teacher. The women's coach at KU making more than 2 million bucks, we are fools.

These historians will see the culture change from men and women who did good for the sake of doing good, to Wefalds of the world ripping off the unknowing taxpayers. They will see the gradual focus of greatness to the horrid I'm getting mine time we live in now.

Just think, why would Hemingway even think he deserved this little smooch. Wefald is a crook.

Why didn't doesn't the LJworld do more to bring these obscene salaries and benefits to the readership?

I know not how, or even if we should put the Genie back in the bottle, but I bet we could. If every school district in Kansas decided to look within the staff finding a leader superintendent who would do the job for less than a quarter million per year could be a starter.

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BlackVelvet 2 years, 9 months ago

All I can say is GOOD RIDDANCE ! ! !

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LHS56 2 years, 9 months ago

Proir to retirement, I would be at my desk at 7:30 and leave at 6:00. I guess I was simply slow because it took me about 50 hours a week to get my job done. I live in a neighborhood with three University employees. Two are professors, one an administrator. I've been amazed that they are able to leave home at nine and be home by three and get their work done. Perhaps the difference is the level of education between my MBA and their Doctors degrees. Or...maybe I should have tried the 9 to 3 day. Ohhh....I don't have tenure.
I know of many that work their fannies off advancing in their field of study and assisting their students. However, the few that take advantage of the system spoil the pie.

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Tammy Copp-Barta 2 years, 9 months ago

He earned that while the admin assistants in his department went without raises and worked 40+ hours a week keeping the lights on, interacting with students and handling the day to day .. still don't understand why faculty make so much and most only show up to teach - and most have taught the same class for years - so no prep work! The people doing the real work day to day continue to get screwed over as we continue to pay the "top dogs" tons of money for nothing!

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yourworstnightmare 2 years, 9 months ago

An academic "golden parachute".

Outrageous indeed, Syc, but it can't hold a candle to the sweetheart multi-million dollar deals in corporate America. Yes, its not taxpayer money, but it is money that could be used to raise the salaries of the average corporate employee or to pay to the shareholders as dividends.

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jimincountry 2 years, 9 months ago

No wonder education costs so much...........enough said.

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demonfury 2 years, 9 months ago

His book ought to be entitled "How to be a Scotch Drunk and Get Paid For It".

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Kontum1972 2 years, 9 months ago

and they wonder why..there is a shortage...just think of the new blood u could hire if u had these leeches off the payroll....

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irvan moore 2 years, 9 months ago

i wonder if he will retire in Lawrence Kansas so we can see if the commissions new plans are working out?

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swunruhawk 2 years, 9 months ago

Is he making progress on the book he's writing? When will it be published?

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Slowponder 2 years, 9 months ago

Was there any discussion in his Sport and Higher Education class about monitoring ticket sales? That would have been a valuable discussion to attend as he would have explained in great detail how he was on top of ticket sales during his tenure as Chancellor. The class interaction would have references to the 5th Amendment, Miranda warnings, how to avoid a perp walk, and repetitions of Sgt. Schultz' "I see nothing, nothing."

Does anyone find it Ironic that he no longer has tickets as compensation?

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irvan moore 2 years, 9 months ago

this is a tough place to be a taxpayer

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Bob Forer 2 years, 9 months ago

Outrageous. The teaching of two classes was merely a ploy to legitimize the sabbatical, as they occur prior to, and not after retirement. Lets do the math. 2 years at $340,352 = $680,704. And for that the taxpayers had two classes taught--no advising, no research, no committee work.

Most professors teach three classes a semester, or six classes a year. Assuming the average salary to be $85,000 per year, that comes to around 14,200 per class. Compare to Hemenway's $340,352 per class.

The Regents who approved this deal should be impeached.

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