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Archive for Thursday, July 7, 2011

Teachers lower request for raises

July 7, 2011

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Negotiators for teachers in the Lawrence school district are inching closer to the district’s position on salary offers for the coming school year.

But both sides admittedly have a long way to go, as the Lawrence school board welcomes a new majority of members next week.

Thursday evening, representatives of the Lawrence Education Association reduced their request for across-the-board raises to $1,435 for each licensed educator. The proposal is down 4.3 percent from the $1,500 the union has been seeking for each of the 926 educators covered by the master agreement now being negotiated.

The union figures that the total reduction would be roughly equal to even the most “generous” interpretation of the district’s latest offer, which would allow teachers who had earned sufficient credit hours or other qualifying training to move ahead on the district’s salary scale.

Of all licensed educators, 39 have applied for such movement, worth anywhere from $500 to $1,500 per teacher, depending on where the teacher qualified on the schedule. At $1,500 for those teachers, the board would be paying teachers an extra total of $58,500 next year.

“We’re wanting to move toward common ground by approximately the same amount that the board team moved the last time,” said David Reber, the union’s lead negotiator, a biology teacher at Free State High School. “It’s still got a long way to go.”

Monday night, district negotiators plan to take the package to members of the school board for review. Four of the seven members will be new, taking office after having been elected in April: Rick Ingram, Shannon Kimball, Randy Masten and Keith Diaz Moore.

Comments

sierraclub 3 years, 5 months ago

Typical unions.....ask for a large pay raise, then seek a 'lower' rasie......

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 5 months ago

In conservativeland, anyone who is an employee is merely a commodity to be used however Really Important People see fit.

KEITHMILES05 3 years, 5 months ago

Why do teachers think they deserve typical raises when these are not typical times? Just preserving their jobs should be utmost concern.

notanota 3 years, 5 months ago

First off, they're not typical raises. It's only for teachers who went through extra training, which I believe wasn't free. Secondly, those teachers will spend the money locally. Thirdly, if they didn't ask, they'd get nothing. Again.

costello 3 years, 5 months ago

It's really hard for me to be sympathetic. I finished a degree last year, which I paid for myself, which "should" have got me a raise. It's the kind of degree that others where I work have got raises for in the past. I didn't get a raise. No one got a raise. No one where I work has received a raise for the past 3 years, and no one is getting a raise this year.

Will I ever get my raise? Probably not. It sucks, but there it is. These are bad times.

Eddie Muñoz 3 years, 5 months ago

The only difference I see between you and the teachers is that they're not staying quiet about it. They don't like the way things are and are actively seeking to change it.

xclusive85 3 years, 5 months ago

Lawrence Education Association reduced their request for across-the-board raises to $1,435 for each licensed educator.

Looks like not only for teachers who went through extra training. I agree with the rest though.

del888 3 years, 5 months ago

Let's not forget the obvious difference between a teacher's salary and a typical employee of a company. A teacher's salary is tied directly to tax dollars while a typical employee's salary is tied to performance and the profitability of the company. Teachers should have some sort of accountabilty set up that allows them a raise if they meet their goal. If I don't make money for my company, I don't get a raise. I'm not sure if I'm reading this acticle correctly, but it sounds like the district's offer "which would allow teachers who had earned sufficient credit hours or other qualifying training to move ahead on the district’s salary scale" is a good idea. According to the article, only 39 teachers have actually applied for this offer.

deskboy04 3 years, 5 months ago

I want teachers to be well paid. They are training future generations of young people. Teachers are "accountable" to parents, students, administrators, and the general public.

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