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Letters to the Editor

Missing history

February 1, 2011

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To the editor:

It’s 2011 and thus it’s the 150th anniversary of the U.S. Civil War and Kansas statehood. In 2011, we have vehicles with stars in bars plates in areas that were Union 150 years ago. So much for history. We have historians revisiting revisionism for tourism’s sake and ignoring the reasons for the war or outright omitting them to sell to an unknowing and uncaring public. We have local and national politicians completely butchering this history to sell themselves to the unknowing and uncaring public trying in futility to omit the sins of the past that still linger to this day.

We have a new governor who proposed an apology to Native Americans that has as much value as confederate money as a U.S. senator, and yet as governor, it’s business as usual. Just ask the Wyandotte tribe about this behavior. One might want to invite the Shawnee, Delaware, Kickapoo, Osage, Miami, Peoria, one band of Sac and Fox and Iowa each, Ottawa, and Citizen Band Potawatomi tribes back to Kansas for this anniversary. The only problem is, the public usually doesn’t want to hear the stories that are whitewashed out of textbooks and lectures.

Don’t even bother to mention the Wichita, Quapaw, Seneca-Shawnee, Wyandotte, and Creek peoples who fled to Kansas as Civil War refugees. Again, why is anyone celebrating this holiday on stolen lands?

Comments

blue73harley 3 years, 2 months ago

Or maybe, just maybe, the names are used with respect. Jeez, always so negative. Are you related to Bozo? Maybe belong to the same self-flagelation club?

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Mike Ford 3 years, 2 months ago

a time machine isn't needed as many of you sound no different than the people who were involved in supporting the theft of this land in the name of manifest destiny and progress a century and a half ago. They wanted relinquishment of tribal identity that was tied to each tribe's ancestral lands so that it would be easier to steal and they did so and because they did so many of you now wonder why there are names like wakarusa, kanwaka, and shunganunga in this area. The Kaw and Shawnee people responsible for these names are in gone from this area and they are romanticized with mascots.nice.

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Mike Ford 3 years, 2 months ago

a time machine isn't needed as many of you sound no different than the people who were involved in supporting the theft of this land in the name of manifest destiny and progress a century and a half ago. They wanted relinquishment of tribal identity that was tied to each tribe's ancestral lands so that it would be easier to steal and they did so and because they did so many of you now wonder why there are names like wakarusa, kanwaka, and shunganunga in this area. The Kaw and Shawnee people responsible for these names are in gone from this area and they are romanticized with mascots.nice.

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blue73harley 3 years, 2 months ago

I wish someone would finally invent a time machine so Mike could go back and fight the injustices rather than simply living in (and whining about) the past.

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Mike Ford 3 years, 2 months ago

I have no credibility with comment trolls......awwwwwww....

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Mike Ford 3 years, 2 months ago

Peorias were here in 1833, Osages here in mid 1600's, Kickapoos were here in 1832, Iowas were here in the late 1700's, Shawnees were here in 1825, Delawares were here in 1829, Citizen Band Potawatomis were here in 1831, Sac and Foxes were here in 1843, Miamis were here in 1846, and the Ottawas were here between 1833 and 1837. Kansas was called Indian Territory because all of these tribes had reservations which many of you either live or travel on. This area was not opened to White settlement prior to 1854 because the eastern side of the state was reservation land and the western area was aboriginal roaming and hunting lands of the Kiowas, Cheyennes, Arapahoes, Comanches, Pawnees, and Apaches. No white people could legally live here except for agents, missionaries, blacksmiths, and teachers. So in essense, your statement is typical of people who get half the picture and run with it.

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Practicality 3 years, 2 months ago

Some of your info in your letter is off tuschy, many of the tribes you mentioned were relocated here from somewhere else when Kansas was considered Indian Territory before Oklahoma was so sanctioned.

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Mike Ford 3 years, 2 months ago

I know how natives in meso and south america are treated. they're exploited. why do you think KU created a global indigenous studies program? they added the global part and made the program more anthro and archae centric because the indigenous peoples in the US and Canada won't tolerate the invasion and subjugation of their cultures for the sake of american centric academia. the people down there can do very little to stop cultural theft and appropriation by foreign academics. Recently, I witnessed the stonewalling by the gop involving the Cobell settlement. the amount arrived at while higher than the gop under bush was a lot less than the amount actually owed. nagpra didn't stop the archaeological dna harvesting of the Kennewick man. nagpra will not stop the slt people from desecrating remains in the way of a needless road. many treaties have been signed by this country and tribes and none of them have been fully respected. In fact in a post last week I referenced the Lone Wolf V. Hitchcock case of 1903 where the US Supreme Court ruled that congress could abrogate or disregard treaties at will because of plenary power ascribed in the commerce clause of the us constitution. Do you really want to know how much your country values tribal treaties???? really??? I do work for a congressionally terminated tribe here in kansas hoping to get maybe 200 acres of rez land back from the 2400 acres lost to settlers in Leavenworth, KS in 1858 and the 3000 or so acres lost to congressional termination in Franklin County, KS in 1900. You want to lecture me about this countrie's fairness... really???? I love how oblivious people try to flip the script on the people calling them out. That's an O Reilly trick or a Shewmon trick right?

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Liberty_One 3 years, 2 months ago

Mr. Ford, in all seriousness, what exactly is it that you want? I see a lot of criticism from you about ignorance and stolen land, but what's your point? People are ignorant about a lot of things. Most people can't find Afghanistan on map. Most people think Benjamin Franklin was President. Yeah, people are ignorant about Native American history, most people have never even heard of the Baltic peoples, which is what I am. You probably haven't either. So what? What's your point? What do you want?

As far as stolen lands, yes, some lands were stolen, some were purchased, some were unoccupied. What do you want to do about it?

And as far as ignorance goes, there were many wrongs done in the past, but are you ignorant about the measures that have been taken since to help right those wrongs? Monies paid to tribes for past harms? Laws that protect the remains of Native Americans that are found and require the return of any that were found in the past? Lands that were returned? Treaties that have been honored? Do you pretend that none of these things happened? Do you pretend that they don't teach about the injustices done to Native Americans in schools?

You certainly act like none of these things ever happened, and so you lose all credibility. There's certainly something to be said in regards to better treatment from our government, more education about past injustices and more respect for Native American people and culture, but your extreme accusations and combative, stand-offish attitude make you sound like a bitter, angry, racist person. The past is the past; things are much different today. Native Americans that live in the United States are wealthier and have more rights and liberties than any other Native Americans in the whole world. You complain about Americans, go to Brazil and see how they treat Native Americans there.

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Mike Ford 3 years, 2 months ago

shukha anumpa haklo li. anumpa okpulo haklo li. chahta imanumpa ish anumpuli hinla ho nahollo?. chahta iskatini anumpuli li. I'm sure you understand right? it was used as a code language in world war one. Spreichen sie deutch? parlais vous francais? you're a smart american, you know what I'm saying right? oh by the way, one of my professors complemented me on the letter.

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Flap Doodle 3 years, 2 months ago

And yet you still use the English language of your oppressors, tushy. You're selling out to the man.

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Mike Ford 3 years, 2 months ago

let's see, the surviving Powhattan Confederacy tribes almost boycotted Virginia's 400th anniversary in 2007. Oklahoma tribes spoke out against sooners and the whitewashing of history .Thirty five pointless comments from the usual suspects who showed what little they know and how little they care. Thanks for taking part in my printed experiment and proving me right and H.L Mencken right. WE MUST CHAMPION VOLUME AND IGNORANCE TO RETURN TO THE MEAN EIGHTIES AND BONZO. KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK.

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Mike Ford 3 years, 2 months ago

let's see, the surviving Powhattan Confederacy tribes almost boycotted Virginia's 400th anniversary in 2007. Oklahoma tribes spoke out against sooners and the whitewashing of history .Thirty five pointless comments from the usual suspects who showed what little they know and how little they care. Thanks for taking part in my printed experiment and proving me right and H.L Mencken right. WE MUST CHAMPION VOLUME AND IGNORANCE TO RETURN TO THE MEAN EIGHTIES AND BONZO. KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK.

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Agnostick 3 years, 2 months ago

I've tried to find this picture or graphic on the web, and I can't find it. It's just something that has stuck with me for 30+ years, and this discussion brings it right up.

It was a t-shirt I saw in a hunting catalog one time... a black silhouette of a Native American warrior, sitting on his horse on top of a hill... one arm stretched out over his head, holding his weapon high. The caption under the image read: "What if...?"

It was very clear that the weapon in his hand was a compound bow.

We all have slightly-different interpretations of history, and events of the past. While I think it's foolish for me to hold something against you... for some great wrong your great-great-great-grandfather might have inflicted on my great-great-great-grandfather... I still may hold some resentment from time to time.

Is it possible for Native Americans to participate in these celebrations, without having to hear the same laundry list of sins and transgressions over and over and over again? I'm "white," caucasian, etc. and I've heard my dad say many times, "A lot of people have been taken advantage of in our history, including black people--but no one has had it as bad as the American Indian."

Just because we don't dwell on it... doesn't mean we don't know.

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Tom Shewmon 3 years, 2 months ago

Fixed_Asset (anonymous) replies… Why is it ok for you to attempt to out an anonymous user? You are pitiful Tom.

February 1, 2011 at 1:03 p.m. permalinkreplysuggest removal

Apparently, you never checked out Liberty One's link before you launched your extremely mean-spirited and uncivil attack on me, which has left me a bit shaken and traumatized. Mike Ford voluntarily offered that he was Tuschkahouma previously. You have really upset me and I'm going to need some time to recover from your demeaning remarks.

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Peacemaker452 3 years, 2 months ago

I tried to move off of my stolen Indian land but the British had already settled some Protestants on the land they stole from my family.

How far back in history are we required to trace our guilt? Were there any people using the land that is now Kansas before the rightful “owners” that Mike/tuschkahouma advocates moved in?

And what happened to all those prairie cheetahs, cave bears, saber tooth cats and dire wolves? Surly our native friends who were one with mother earth had nothing to do with their demise. Or maybe it was in their best interest to get rid of some of the carnivorous competition; you know, free market and all.

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booyalab 3 years, 2 months ago

I'm pretty sure the history of the oppression of native americans has been quite hammered into the head of anyone who has attended public school for the past 50 years, along with slavery, the civil rights movement, and the Glorious New Deal. I was literally taught nothing else in my required American history classes.

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Liberty_One 3 years, 2 months ago

"Again, why is anyone celebrating this holiday on stolen lands?"

I didn't steal any lands, so what is Mr. Ford talking about? Surely it's not a racist allusion to the color of people's skin and some sort of guilt by pigment level, is it?

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mom_of_three 3 years, 2 months ago

It's a poorly written letter, but I understand the point. It is hard for some to celebrate something when there is a big, dark shadow all over it. Most of the northeastern portion of the state, and probably more, was Indian lands taken over by whites when the Kansas Nebraska act was signed in 1854 and no one cared. Not really.
Then people crowded in to fight over slavery, and ignored the fact it wasn't their land to begin with. But you can say that for major parts of the South and upper Northwest and well, all over the darn place.
for me, that exceptionalism word that is getting bantered about by some is a touchy subject, because it is what allowed all of the above to take place.

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Flap Doodle 3 years, 2 months ago

When Mistress Ilsa puts Devo on the CD player, she whip most nearly anything.

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Scott Morgan 3 years, 2 months ago

Could Mistress Ilsa whip up some pasta?

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Flap Doodle 3 years, 2 months ago

At our next appointment, I will ask Mistress Ilsa to punish me extra hard for the sins of the white devils.

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Scott Morgan 3 years, 2 months ago

My people long ago forgave the Romans for mistreatment and abuse suffered under occupation. The Romans treated my people barbarically.

I've demanded personal apologies from Romans. They to a person claim they know nothing more than their ancestors almost certainly didn't participate. Often this was followed by an offer of pasta.

I like pasta. Pasta is better than holding on to bitter beliefs nothing can be done about now. Warm buttery garlic bread too.

Actually on a day like this, whipping up some Marinara sauce maybe in order.

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cato_the_elder 3 years, 2 months ago

Anyone who would write a letter referring to "stars in bars" rather than "stars and bars" has no understanding of American history.

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jaywalker 3 years, 2 months ago

Exactly, Mike! I can't even believe that people have the audacity to live on these "stolen lands", let alone celebrate anything. We canceled my 7 year old nieces' birthday party for the same reason. In fact, all my friends and family are so wracked with guilt and misery we've vowed never to smile, laugh, or be in good nature ever again. I've taken one giant step further.....literally......as I'm reticent to even set foot on the "stolen lands" of Kansas; I broad jump my way around the state so as not to be on the ground as much as possible. No, no, I'm no hero, just acting rationally and with the proper guilt for things I've had no hand in.

Please excuse me now, but I have a full day of mortification of the flesh lined up, a little righteous self-flaggelation over the sins of our great-great-great-great grandfathers. I'm sure you're doing the same.

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BornAgainAmerican 3 years, 2 months ago

Thank goodness we have Tuschy to tell us how it really was.

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geoismeo 3 years, 2 months ago

This guy is a broken record. It must miserable having this much hate and racism.

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Tom Shewmon 3 years, 2 months ago

Tuschy is the one who has referenced me being a bad customer with bad manners in a few posts. I'm thinking about "Shep" in the movie "Fargo". I better clean up my act...lol!

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Tom Shewmon 3 years, 2 months ago

"...stories that are whitewashed out of textbooks and lectures."

Oh, we see alot of that the past several decades. I know, because Fox News and Glen Beck told me so.

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