Archive for Wednesday, September 22, 2010

KU students build traditional hut to celebrate Jewish holiday Sukkot

Symbolic hut will house events including prayers, lunches

Kansas University sophomore Michael Lebovitz, Prairie Village, uses a nearby tree to tie down a sukkah, or temporary hut or shelter,  outside the Kansas Union on Wednesday in recognition of the Jewish holiday of Sukkot. According to Rabbi Zalman Tiechtel, executive director of the Chabad Center for Jewish Life, the eight-day holiday begins Wednesday night and lasts until Friday morning of the following week. Lebovitz explained that building the sukkah is a way for Jews to reconnect with their history.

Kansas University sophomore Michael Lebovitz, Prairie Village, uses a nearby tree to tie down a sukkah, or temporary hut or shelter, outside the Kansas Union on Wednesday in recognition of the Jewish holiday of Sukkot. According to Rabbi Zalman Tiechtel, executive director of the Chabad Center for Jewish Life, the eight-day holiday begins Wednesday night and lasts until Friday morning of the following week. Lebovitz explained that building the sukkah is a way for Jews to reconnect with their history.

September 22, 2010

Advertisement

Hundreds of Jews on the Kansas University campus are celebrating a week-long holiday with a special hut they built outside the student union.

Hut built at KU for Jewish celebration

Members of the local Jewish community worked together on the KU campus to construct a hut that will be used in observing a religious holiday. The huts are part of the Sukkot tradition. Enlarge video

The holiday is Sukkot and the 4x6 metal, tarp and bamboo hut is called a Sukkah.

“Many Jewish students erect this hut in their backyards at home every year but because they live in apartments and residence homes at school they don’t have that opportunity so we find a central location on campus to set it up,” said Rabbi Zalman Tiechtel of the Chabad Center for Jewish Life.

The hut symbolizes the kinds of dwellings their ancestors lived in during a treacherous time.

According to Jewish history, God performed miracles for their people that sustained them during a 40-year journey through the Sinai Desert.

“I like the holidays that not a lot of people know about except the Jewish people because it draws attention to it and expands their horizons,” said Jewish student Matt Rissien, whose family builds a Sukkah in his backyard at home every year.

The holiday began at sundown Wednesday and several week-long events are set to take place inside the hut including prayers and daily free lunches for all.

“Our goal is to promote Jewish awareness and Jewish identity because KU prides itself on being a very diverse and very multi-cultural community, said Rabbi Tiechtel.

This is the fifth year the Chabad Center for Jewish Life has erected the Sukkah on campus.

Other holiday events will take place at the center, 1201-1203 W. 19th St.

Comments

skinny 4 years, 11 months ago

But no Christmas trees or Christmas lights are allowed on the KU Campus. Makes a lot of sense!

christy kennedy 4 years, 11 months ago

Oh, please. Just how are your tax dollars paying for this? And no on involved with the Muslim community center project is calling it a "Victory Mosque." Just you hateful types. "Abomination"? Really? There are peace poles around town, pardon if I don't know what you're talking about when you say "Christian peace pole," but is there such a thing that has been "rejected" here? These folks are carrying on long-held traditions that don't harm you in any way. What's all the anger about?

notajayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

Don't be silly, you know those rules apply only to Christians.

John Kyle 4 years, 11 months ago

This is an event put on by a student group. Christian student groups can, and do put on events at KU. Hell, they hand out bibles on campus about twice a year. Get over your persecution complex.

walter_sobchak 4 years, 11 months ago

Saturday, Donny, is Shabbos, the Jewish day of rest.

mdrndgtl 4 years, 11 months ago

Three thousand years of beautiful tradition, from Moses to Sandy Koufax...

Commenting has been disabled for this item.