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Archive for Sunday, September 13, 2009

Fair focuses on saving energy

Gary Long, center, with Cycle Works, explains to Frank Schawalcer the power assist bicycle that runs on rechargeable batteries at Saturday’s Lawrence Energy Conservation Fair.

Gary Long, center, with Cycle Works, explains to Frank Schawalcer the power assist bicycle that runs on rechargeable batteries at Saturday’s Lawrence Energy Conservation Fair.

September 13, 2009

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Lee’s Summit musician Stan Slaughter — known as the Eco-Troubadour — entertained attendees with his original eco-friendly songs at Saturday’s Lawrence Energy Conservation Fair at the Lawrence Community Building, 115 W. 11th St.

Though his songs, such as “Feed it to the Worms” and “Landfill Blues,” are far from well-known hits, the lyrics were catchy and brought a positive message about protecting the environment.

“It seems to lift all boats. It’s happy,” said Slaughter between sets.

Attendees listened to Slaughter and his two backup singers — wife Linda Chubbick and friend Judy Best — as they checked out dozens of exhibits and vendors featuring various environmentally friendly products, such as heating systems, solar panels and electric cars.

The messages in Slaughter’s songs about protecting the environment were simple: compost, recycle, take care of the earth.

“It’s basic earth citizenship stuff,” said Slaughter, who travels the state performing his songs for schools as part of Kansas’ Green Schools program.

Slaughter, who’s been singing eco-friendly tunes since 1990, said he sees his music as a first step in raising awareness about environmental issues.

“You get introduced to a topic and you learn more about it,” he said.

Event attendee Dianna Henry danced to Slaughter’s songs, and said she appreciated the musician’s messages that appeal to younger listeners.

“The children are where we need to hit it,” said Henry of the need to focus environmental education on the younger generation.

And the message about the environment is getting through to all ages, Slaughter said. He’s seen “huge changes” during his nearly two decades of performing in the level of acceptance by the general population about the need to protect the environment.

Slaughter cited the large number of vendors and visitors at the day’s event.

“All of it has come along,” Slaughter said. “There’s a lot of interest here.”

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