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Archive for Monday, October 12, 2009

First H1N1 vaccine clinic in Douglas County scheduled — but supplies will be limited

As the Lawrence-Douglas County Health Department prepares for its first community swine flu vaccination clinic on Oct. 21, it reminds the public the supply will be limited — at first.

October 12, 2009

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Swine Flu Pandemic

An outbreak of H1N1 Swine Flu was reported in Mexico in April 2009. By the end of May, it had spread across the U.S., with all 50 states reporting cases.

As the Lawrence-Douglas County Health Department prepares for its first community swine flu vaccination clinic on Oct. 21, it reminds the public the supply will be limited — at first.

That’s why it’s important that only people who fall into the priority group get vaccinated first.

Kim Ens, a registered nurse and preparedness coordinator, said these people most likely would suffer complications if they got swine flu:

• Pregnant women.

• People between 6 months and 24 years. Children younger than 10 will need to get two shots at least four weeks apart.

• People who live with or care for children younger than 6 months. That’s because these children are too young to get the vaccine. That priority group doesn’t include extended family, Ens said, but does include parents and day-care providers.

• Health care and emergency services personnel. Ens strongly encourages only workers who are in direct contact with acutely ill people to get vaccinated first. “Eventually, we want all health care providers — even the people working in the cafeteria and housekeepers — to get the vaccine, but right now, we have limited vaccine.”

• People age 25 through 64 who have health conditions associated with higher risk of medical complications from the flu, such as: lung cancer, asthma, hepatitis, cirrhosis, kidney disease, heart disease, leukemia, multiple sclerosis and diabetes. “It’s hard to lump into categories because some people with MS are leading healthy lifestyles. ... There are very healthy diabetics who are very well maintained,” she said.

She said if people have been hospitalized within the past year or see a health care provider often, they likely would fit into the priority group.

Ens said eventually, there will be enough vaccine for everyone who wants one and she encourages them to do so.

“Vaccination is the No. 1 way people can reduce their risk of getting the virus,” she said.

Comments

Karrey Britt 4 years, 6 months ago

The schedule of H1N1 vaccine clinics can be found at http://tinyurl.com/yjgkbkh.

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gr 4 years, 6 months ago

“Vaccination is the No. 1 way people can reduce their risk of getting the virus,” she said.

Yeah, and any scientific support to back that up?

Vaccination is the No. 1 way people can get the virus. What do you think "vaccination" is.

They inject either a dead virus into you which somehow is supposed to convey "immunity" from it's proteins or other fragments or they inject a live virus into you and hope you don't die.

Some people's immune system fight the vaccination, so they have to add adjuvants to get it past your immune system. Then, they may have to give you more than one dose so your body doesn't counter act the foreign substances whether it be monkey kidney cells, monkey testicle cells, chicken cells, or whatever else they choose.

Anyone for monkey flu or bird flu?

How would one go about combining viruses to create a "novel" type of virus? Where do you think pig flu came from? How about incubating a human virus along with some other animal viruses? Think they can insure those eggs have no other viruses?

CDC creates viruses: http://www.recombinomics.com/News/01040502/Korea_Recombination_Reassortment.html

These projected experiments are to be welcomed for 2 reasons; if negative, they may allay some of the hysteria associated with recent predictions of the imminence of a new influenza pandemic, and if positive, they might facilitate prediction of the likely antigenicity of avian-human virus hybrids and accelerate rational vaccine design. - Mod.CP]<<

"WHO and CDC just need to look at GenBank. Their experiment has already been done in swine in Korea. The H1N1 human virus (WSN/33) and avian viruses (H9N2) have already co-infected swine, and produced a variety of reassorted and recombined viruses."

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marcirae18 4 years, 6 months ago

yeah it gives a date that there going to be giving the shots....but what times are they doing it...I have to children that get sick very easily and really need to get this vaccine...

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Karrey Britt 4 years, 6 months ago

That's right Lori. According to Kim Ens, people ages 65 and older have not gotten sick with swine flu. "We are just not seeing it," she said. Of course, that age group is encouraged to get the vaccine just like everyone else. They are just not in the priority group.

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lori 4 years, 6 months ago

No, in part because there appears to be some sort of immunity in those over 65.

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smitty 4 years, 6 months ago

People age 25 through 64 who have health conditions .....people 65 and over with health conditions are not considered a high risk category?

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Boston_Corbett 4 years, 6 months ago

Is the vaccination site on a trade route?

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rodentgirl16 4 years, 6 months ago

I'm glad they explained the part about the chronic health conditions because while I have allergic asthma, it's not a big deal and is under control. However, they make it sound like everyone with asthma should get vaccinated, thus taking away the vaccine from people who really need it.

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