Archive for Wednesday, November 25, 2009

Local residents work together to make donation to Locks of Love

Ten employees from two Lawrence Businesses, including Peggy Corkins, seated, joined forces to donate their hair to Locks of Love, a nonprofit that provides hairpieces to children who suffer from hair loss caused by illness. Corkins clapped after 10 inches of her hair were cut by stylist Debbie Johnson at Shear Perfection salon, 2311 Wakarusa Drive.

Ten employees from two Lawrence Businesses, including Peggy Corkins, seated, joined forces to donate their hair to Locks of Love, a nonprofit that provides hairpieces to children who suffer from hair loss caused by illness. Corkins clapped after 10 inches of her hair were cut by stylist Debbie Johnson at Shear Perfection salon, 2311 Wakarusa Drive.

November 25, 2009

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Residents donate hair for cause

Local residents are donating locks of hair for charity. The hair will be used mainly to make wigs. Enlarge video

Carl Stover got 10 inches of hair snipped off — making it his first haircut in 10 years.

“The last time I had short hair, I was in grade school,” he said.

Stover and nine others — most of whom work at Berry Plastics in Lawrence — decided to grow out their hair, then donate it to Locks of Love, a non-profit that provides hairpieces to children who suffer from hair loss caused by illness.  

“It really feels good to know that I’m doing something for somebody else, and it’s a very simple thing to do,” said Frances Wisdom, a Berry Plastics employee who lopped about 2 feet off her hair. “Anybody can do it.”

Not exactly everyone can donate to Locks of Love. The organization accepts only ponytails that measure between 6 and 10 inches in length. The strands also must not be dyed. The longer hair will be made into wigs, while the shorter clippings are sold to offset manufacturing costs for the hairpieces.

“I haven’t had a haircut for probably two years,” said Marilyn Vanderweide, an employee at Luminous Neon Art & Sign Systems in Lawrence. Her employer works with Berry Plastics, so she decided to join with them for their group donation to Locks of Love. While her hair might feel shorter and lighter, there won’t be a shortage to the amount of thanks for her generosity.

“It’s just a little thing to lose your hair when your life is well,” Vanderweide said. “To gain that back in some fashion means so much to people.”

Comments

George_Braziller 5 years, 8 months ago

I'm just curious. Who buys the shorter clippings and how are they used?

"while the shorter clippings are sold to offset manufacturing costs for the hairpieces"

Tammy Copp-Barta 5 years, 8 months ago

I know that some of the companies that sell perms and coloring products buy them to test colors and perms on human hair for results .. so I'm sure that's where some of it goes.

George_Braziller 5 years, 8 months ago

Thanks. I didn't think about that use. I'm sure there are more. Possibly they are also used for toupees and high-quality wigs for the "wispy" hairs around the edges so they look real rather than just planted on the head.

My aunt had one that was horrific. It looked like a cat had scratched on a grey sofa and she just stuck the loose stuff to her head -- it was BAD.

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