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Archive for Sunday, November 22, 2009

Eudora students get Chinese instruction

KU Center for East Asian Studies puts on workshops

Randi Hacker, outreach coordinator at Kansas University’s Center for East Asian Studies, teaches Eudora Elementary School instructor Staci Mann’s third-grade class how to pronounce the names of the Chinese New Year birth animals. The lesson was part of a “Five Days of Chinese” outreach program.

Randi Hacker, outreach coordinator at Kansas University’s Center for East Asian Studies, teaches Eudora Elementary School instructor Staci Mann’s third-grade class how to pronounce the names of the Chinese New Year birth animals. The lesson was part of a “Five Days of Chinese” outreach program.

November 22, 2009

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— Randi Hacker stood in front of Staci Mann’s third-grade class, enthusiastically telling various students they were either a snake or a dragon. But in the context of the Chinese New Year birth animals, snakes are wise and dragons are pioneering and strong.

The activity was part of the Chinese lessons that Hacker, who is the outreach coordinator at Kansas University’s Center for East Asian Studies, has been teaching third-grade classes at Eudora Elementary School.

The lessons were part of Hacker’s Five Days of Chinese, which introduced the students to basic Chinese vocabulary and is funded by a federal grant promoting outreach.

Lessons included Chinese pronunciation of colors, animals of the Chinese New Year and how to sing the song “Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes” in Chinese.

Hacker has been taking the program into schools throughout the area and also wrote a book called “The Fastest Pig in the West,” which teaches students about the immigrant experience through a fictional account of a Chinese boy in Kansas and his journey to discover his place in both cultures.

The book, which she gave to classes in Eudora, also includes sections about Chinese culture and history, as well as an online teaching guide.

“I think learning any other language is important, whether it’s Chinese, Dutch or Mongolian,” Hacker said. “Being able to know another language, first of all, changes the way you think. Second of all, when you’re that young, it’s as easy as pie to pick up another language.”

Third-grade teacher Mann said she was glad to give her students the opportunity to learn about other cultures.

Though Hacker only visits the students once a week, they have been able to pick up where the last lesson finished.

“I’m never shocked, but I’m always impressed by how well they remember things,” Hacker said. “It’s so amazing to me because their minds are completely open.”

Chyenne Kurtz, a student in Peggy Johnson’s third-grade class, said she didn’t have a favorite part of the lessons because it was all enjoyable to her.

“I like how it’s written and how their culture is,” Chyenne said. “In case I ever go there, I can actually have a conversation with the people.”

Hacker said she hoped to see schools begin to teach second languages to elementary-age students.

“There are always reasons to learn other languages and if you wait until high school, it’s almost too late,” Hacker said. “There’s no reason why these children should not speak two languages.”

Comments

tyson travis 5 years, 2 months ago

Lawrence schools used to do this in the 1950s, all students chose between French, German, or Spanish, and a visiting teacher came in a couple of times a week for an hour or two. Childrens' minds are much more flexible than adults, a language learned early is a valuable asset. Whatever happened to this program?

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