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Archive for Monday, August 24, 2009

KU’s swine flu cases reach 47

August 24, 2009, 9:11 a.m. Updated August 24, 2009, 5:56 p.m.

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Swine Flu Pandemic

An outbreak of H1N1 Swine Flu was reported in Mexico in April 2009. By the end of May, it had spread across the U.S., with all 50 states reporting cases.

At Kansas University, the number of swine flu cases tripled over the weekend.

According to KU spokesman Todd Cohen, 47 of KU’s 27,000 students were presenting swine flu symptoms on Monday.

KU officials are are asking anyone who may have flu symptoms to stay home until their temperature is at a normal level for at least 24 hours. Students living in the dorms who may fall ill are asked to stay in and around their rooms and away from other students until the symptoms have disappeared.

Comments

Marion Lynn 4 years, 7 months ago

"ferretpop (Anonymous) says…

Flu Was Not the Real Killer in the 1918 Pandemic!

Strep infections, rather than the flu virus itself, may have killed most people during the 1918 influenza pandemic. This suggests that some of the most dire predictions about a potential new pandemic could be exaggerated.

Sources: Reuters February 5, 2009 Emerging Infectious Diseases February 2009; 15(2):346-7"

Marion writes:

From your citation:

"People with influenza often get what is known as a "superinfection" with a bacterial agent. In 1918 it appears to have been Streptococcus pneumoniae.

Many projections for a new pandemic have been based on a worst-case 1918 scenario, in which tens of millions of people would die globally. However, since strep is much easier to treat than the flu using modern medicine, a new pandemic might be much less dire than it was in the early 20th century."

Or it might not be if health care systems are overloaded from flu victims.

The point that you're missing is that although the 1918 deaths may not have been caused by the flu itself, the deaths may well have been caused by stuff that people got "BECAUSE" they had the flu!

Like AIDS.

AIDS hasn't killed anyone.

The maladies that people get because of the weakened immune systems kills them.

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h1n1histeria 4 years, 7 months ago

I was told by a Langston Hughes parent that the school's counselor is not letting her child start Kindergarten (she is taking family leave) because she thinks they will contract the swine flu at school. So, how are we supposed to feel about letting our kids go to school? Is there something the District office and School Board is not telling us?

Also, how can the District afford to pay a counselor to stay home when the budget is so tight? What do you tell parents who have these same fears, but still have to go to work to get paid.

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ferretpop 4 years, 7 months ago

What is the Real Cause of Influenza Epidemics?

Influenza does not follow the predicted patterns for infectious diseases. In fact, there are several conundrums associated with influenza epidemics, such as discussed in the following two sources:

Virology Journal 2008, 5: 29 CBCNews.ca October 22, 2008

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2008/11/13/what-is-the-real-cause-of-influenza-epidemics.aspx

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ferretpop 4 years, 7 months ago

Flu Was Not the Real Killer in the 1918 Pandemic!

Strep infections, rather than the flu virus itself, may have killed most people during the 1918 influenza pandemic. This suggests that some of the most dire predictions about a potential new pandemic could be exaggerated.

Sources: Reuters February 5, 2009 Emerging Infectious Diseases February 2009; 15(2):346-7

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/02/28/flu-was-not-the-real-killer-in-the-1918-pandemic.aspx

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absolutelyridiculous 4 years, 7 months ago

My kids just came home and said a bunch of kids went home today from elementary school. Hmmmm?

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jhawkrx10 4 years, 7 months ago

YesItsMe (Anonymous) says…

Why are we reporting 47 cases of swine flu when these people have not been tested for it yet?


There is a quick test that can be done in the office to determine if a patient has influenza of any variety (Swine or seasonal), with results available in ~15 minutes.

My understanding of what is going on is that the Student Health Center (and other clinics for that matter) is running this test and if it comes back positive, they are reporting it as swine flu (H1N1). Because of the time of year, it is a fairly safe assumption that someone testing positive for influenza will have H1N1 and the test to actually confirm it must be done at a state lab or CDC lab and is expensive.

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YesItsMe 4 years, 7 months ago

Well I'm sick today, does that mean we can all assume its swine? Go ahead and count me down as #48, dont worry about testing me for it, just go ahead and print it as fact.

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Boston_Corbett 4 years, 7 months ago

Once again Marion blathers on about topics of which he has no knowledge: ".the virus mutates and becomes more deadly, as viruses are wont to do and both the CDC and WHO tell us that it could."


I would rather eat arsenic on my Post Toasties before depending upon Marion for any public health.

There is no reason to assume or believe this flu will become more lethal than it already is. Flu's do not "mutate" but experience a constant process of genetic drift. It is speculated that the strain was created through a rare "re-assortment" event where two flus infected the same organism.

And there is no scientific basis to support the frequently asserted proposition that the 1918 pandemic became more lethal over time, despite what Marion says. Yesterday's report also distinguishes the current H1N1 outbreak from the 1918 pandemic.

http://www.virology.ws/2009/06/19/riding-the-influenza-pandemic-wave/

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Bob_Keeshan 4 years, 7 months ago

I think the comments here prove without a shadow of a doubt that if you are confused about the swine flu you should trust anonymous internet posters and not public health experts.

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Paul R Getto 4 years, 7 months ago

Wash your hands, folks. This stuff is nasty, but probably not all that difficult. This is a good reminder that we are only allowed to be parasites on our little blue planet for a period of time. The little ones still own the place and they've been around a lot longer.

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ferretpop 4 years, 7 months ago

Proper hygiene such as washing one's hands is certainly a start to decrease the possibility of spreading the virus to one's own nose and mouth and to others. An additional action for good hygiene in schools might be to replace antibacterial soaps with a chemical-free soap. Antibacterial soaps kill both good and bad bacteria leaving the immunity system of the washed flesh weakened.

Information could be provided to students and parents to naturally introduce antibiotics for building up the immune system:

Freshly crushed garlic cloves work like a broad-spectrum antibiotic against bacteria, virus, and protozoa in your body. However, if a person is allergic or doesn't enjoy garlic it would be best to avoid as it will likely cause more harm than good. Other all-natural antibiotics include olive leaf extract and oil of oregano.

A strong immune system is necessary to fighting off viruses. Therefore, sugar and processed foods should be avoided. Sugar decreases the function of one's immune system almost immediately.

Optimizing one's vitamin D levels is one of the absolute best strategies for avoiding infections of all kinds.

Avoid transfats in one's diet.

Since hospitals are prime breeding grounds for infections of all kinds, avoid hospitals.

I, personally, think it is a bad idea to turn schools into medical clinics and test experimental swine flu vaccines on children first. Especially when nobody has any liability. State health officials should encourage all parents of school children to consider the information provided by the National Vaccine Information Center. Information can be obtained from their web site.

http://www.nvic.org/NVIC-Vaccine-News/July-2009/Swine-Flu-Vaccine-Should-Not-Be-Given-to-Children.aspx

Additionally, parents should be informed on the subject of the vaccine adjuvant squalene. There are significant health risks associated with injections of vaccines containing squalene. Lets not forget that some swine flu manufactures will continue to use mercury in their version of the vaccine.

It is my hope that all who have oversight in preventing and containing the spread of swine flu will give serious consideration to the above suggestions.

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Marion Lynn 4 years, 7 months ago

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2009/08/24/health/main5262396.shtml?tag=stack

From the citation:

"(CBS/ AP) The H1N1 (swine) flu virus won't resemble the deadly 1918 flu pandemic, but it still "poses a serious health threat" to Americans, the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology said in a report released Monday.

The government should speed availability of at least a little H1N1 vaccine next month instead of in October, the scientific advisers recommended Monday.

The report also urges that federal health officials do more social networking to put the young people targeted by the virus on notice; clarify who should use anti-flu drugs and how; and improve tracking of the fast-moving virus.

The Obama administration said it already is taking many of the steps recommended in the 68-page report from the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, a group of leading scientists. For example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expects to issue revised flu treatment guidelines by month's end. It reports over 300,000 followers of its emergency Twitter, up from 30,000 when swine flu first struck in the spring.

Yet officials at a CDC conference in Atlanta defended the schedule for the nearly $2 billion H1N1 vaccine program, insisting that it will be safe and effective, reports CBS News medical correspondent Dr. Jennifer Ashton. They were skeptical of the Presidential council's Call to begin vaccinating in September, one month early.

"We still think mid-October is a good target for the major production to roll off," Health and Human Service Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said. "It's possible some of the companies could accelerate that."

Health officials are concerned that the H1N1 flu could peak in early fall, because most infections are among young people and they spread the virus very easily, Ashton reports.

"When school starts again, there will be the likelihood that those folks that are most likely to get H1N1 - the school-age population - will be back together and you'll see an increase in disease again," Dr. Daniel Jernigan, deputy director of the CDC's influenza division, told Ashton.

Today, CDC doctors said this year's flu season presents a unique challenge: an H1N1 flu season with many young people sick in the fall, followed by the regular seasonal flu in the winter that strikes the elderly particularly hard."

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twinetowngirl 4 years, 7 months ago

This forced vaccination is what we should all be fearful of!!

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twinetowngirl 4 years, 7 months ago

from www.pandemicfluonline.com Vaccines: who do you trust? Pharmaceutical companies use scare tactics to get you to take vaccines. then, not only do they profit from sales of the vaccine, they profit from the future damage that they cause in drug sales.

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Marion Lynn 4 years, 7 months ago

Yes, and 30,000-90,000 deaths are probably acceptable in the Grand Sdheme of Things, unless........

....the virus mutates and becomes more deadly, as viruses are wont to do and both the CDC and WHO tell us that it could.

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YesItsMe 4 years, 7 months ago

Why are we reporting 47 cases of swine flu when these people have not been tested for it yet?

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Darwin 4 years, 7 months ago

Let's see...we can now figure that just like the "common" flu...the H1N1 virus is here to stay. As is common with virus's, this should mutate into other strains. Currently, the younger population is at risk, but I wouldn't be surprised to see this start affecting an age range of 50-70 into late fall through winter. Of course...sporting events like football and basketball will make matters worse, because this will cause even further spread of the H1N1. Then again...if we are playing against Missouri...one can make an allowance with this. However, I would be highly surprised to see any games canceled or postponed regardless of how many people are sick around here. Too many $$$ would disappear as a result. I'm sorry, but when it comes to big money over people's safety...we all know what the answer to that one is.

Everyone of course has to take extra precautions...moreso if you are susceptible to the flu. Of course...the ones that have absolutely no common sense are are usually the ones causing the most problems.

But what the heck...I'm not a Bio-Chemist by profession.

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kusp8 4 years, 7 months ago

Wahoo #1 in Basketball, #1 in Football, and now #1 in Swine Flu!!!! Wahoo!

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Boston_Corbett 4 years, 7 months ago

seekeroftruth: I fear you read no better than Marion. The University has reported "suspected" cases of influenza. The AP copy reports it accurately. The LJW copy is correct for that matter. It is the headline that is wrong. It should be "suspected cases are 47" not "swine [H1N1] flu cases are 47"

Marion: Yes, a lot of people will get sick, and there could be higher mortality due to a larger number people infected this year. But Marion, you were predicting immediate catastrophe and doom and gloom from the very beginning last spring, calling for closing of the Mexican border, and you were simply wrong, wrong, wrong in so many assertions. You can post all the current news articles you want, but you were simply, terribly wrong. Your scare tactics are, as usual, terribly misleading.

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CamandAddisonsmommy 4 years, 7 months ago

Did_I_say_that Ok so because people want to go out sick I have to keep my daughter inside. No thats not right. My daughter has spent most of her life in a hospital room I shouldn't have to keep her in side. Have enough respect for other people stay home.

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Zachary Stoltenberg 4 years, 7 months ago

And of course we all know how accurate king osama's numbers have been lately!

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Marion Lynn 4 years, 7 months ago

Marion wrties:

For the reading imparied among you, I quote from the article to which I linked:

"The H1N1 flu virus could kill between 30,000 and 90,000 deaths in the United States and “poses a serious health threat” the Obama administration's advisory group on Science and Technology said in a report released Monday."

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seekeroftruth 4 years, 7 months ago

http://www.fox4kc.com/wdaf-story-ku-swine-flu-082209,0,4214835.story

This is where the KU lab comes in:

5th line down---

"The KU Student Health Center laboratory is testing and treating students for the virus, which has been spreading through the campus housing complexes."

Someone either was told the wrong info if they are not testing or they took the liberty of bending the truth --or they really do have a lab capable of testing...

No matter-because H1N1 is the only strain circulating in any large numbers here in KS...

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Multidisciplinary 4 years, 7 months ago

Did I...not as easy as that. Parents aren't allowed the control they would like when it comes to the state and school policy.

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seekeroftruth 4 years, 7 months ago

on a lighter note...

try saying Deedie Dowdle 3 times really fast!

"So far, everybody seems to be recovering," said Deedie Dowdle.

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seekeroftruth 4 years, 7 months ago

Boston--it IS Correct.

"And Editors at the LJW: Your headline is factually incorrect.

There is a huge difference between suspected and confirmed H1N1 cases. The distinction IS important.

Why? People like Marion who do not read, and always take headlines literally."

Boston,

Go straight to the source please. All you have to do is give Todd Cohen at Watkins Health Center a call--he'll set ya straight--that case count of 47 is correct as of Sunday. I am sure it will be even higher after today since it is increasing. KU is able to run its own tests in-house to confirm.

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Benjamin Roberts 4 years, 7 months ago

CamandAddisonsmommy (Anonymous) says… "Please stay at home if your sick! My daughter is immunesupressed and any flu could be bad on her. So if your sick or if your kids are sick stay at home!"

I agree...Stay home if you are sick. However, if my daughter had immunosuppression I would keep her home and not depend on the sick to stay home.

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Boston_Corbett 4 years, 7 months ago

"typical seasonal flu kills between 30,000 and 40,000"

yup, Marion, just like we've been telling you since last spring.


And Editors at the LJW: Your headline is factually incorrect.

There is a huge difference between suspected and confirmed H1N1 cases. The distinction IS important.

Why? People like Marion who do not read, and always take headlines literally.

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Marion Lynn 4 years, 7 months ago

H1N1 Could Kill Up to 90,000 in U.S., Report Says Monday , August 24, 2009

The H1N1 flu virus could kill between 30,000 and 90,000 deaths in the United States and "poses a serious health threat" the Obama administration's advisory group on Science and Technology said in a report released Monday.

Deaths would be concentrated among children and young adults, according to the report. In contrast, the typical seasonal flu kills between 30,000 and 40,000 annually — mainly among people over 65.

The report predicts 1.8 million will be hospitalized during the epidemic, with up to 300,000 patients requiring intensive care units.

These patients could occupy 50-100 percent of all ICU beds in affected regions at the peak of the epidemic and would place "enormous stress" on ICU units.

More needs to be done to speed up the "preparation of flu vaccine for distribution to high-risk individuals," otherwise the vaccine campaign – currently scheduled to begin in mid October — will have potentially missed the peak of the epidemic, according to the report.

Monday’s report from the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, PCAST, shows a sober assessment of the dangers of a pandemic, but also serves as a pat on the back for a White House preparing for its first public health crisis.

"Based on the history of influenza pandemics over the past hundred years, PCAST places the current outbreak somewhere between the two extremes that have informed public opinion about influenza," states the report. "On the one hand, the 2009-H1N1 virus does not thus far seem to show the virulence associated with the devastating pandemic of 1918-19. On the other hand, the 2009-H1N1 virus is a serious threat to our nation and the world."

This is due to the likelihood that more people will be infected because so few people have immunity to the strain.

As a result, PCAST recommends that the Food and Drug Administration "accelerate a decision about the availability of antiviral drugs for intravenous use." The current expectation is that the vaccine will be available in mid-October.

PCAST says under its model scenario, "the resurgence of the epidemic would start in September and peak in mid-October. If this model is approximately correct with respect to timing, a vaccination campaign would not begin to protect vaccines until well after the epidemic had peaked."....................

Marion writes:

The rest of the article may be found here:

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,542083,00.html

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Boston_Corbett 4 years, 7 months ago

I think we're in for it with this one. - Marion S. Lynn — I concur but also expect that one or the other of the flus or hemoragic fevers is going to take care of that matter for us and in the not too distant future. - Marion S. Lynn _ I would be out trying to find some masks and thinking about preparation as this situation is going downhill fast.- Marion S. Lynn _ If you get locked out, no one may let you in.- Marion S. Lynn _ Got YOUR masks yet?- Marion S. Lynn _ Why is the US/Mexican border not closed?- Marion S. Lynn _ Get your N95s while you still can.- Marion S. Lynn _ There are still N95s on a few store shelves.- Marion S. Lynn _ Essentially, you are on your own- Marion S. Lynn _ See, the thing is about flu and other diseases is that they can run and run hard. _ N95 masks are still available but will most likely be sold out in a few days - Marion S. Lynn


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Boston_Corbett 4 years, 7 months ago

Who said there are lies, damned lies, and posts from Marion.

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Marion Lynn 4 years, 7 months ago

The LMH link has not been updated since April 29, 2009.

The WHO Pandemic Level is 6; the worst that it can be.

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Marion Lynn 4 years, 7 months ago

LA_Ex (Anonymous) says…

H1N1 actually has a slightly higher fatality rate that seasonal influenza. It is the responsibility of both types of flu patients to minimize their contact with the general public to lessen the spread. Not only because nobody wants another person to feel miserable, but both have HUGE financial impacts due to lost revenue and wages."

Marion writes:

Stop trying to confuse people with facts, please.

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seekeroftruth 4 years, 7 months ago

Hmm-wow-there is a link to LMH from KU's website for info:

AND they have a swine flu info line at:

http://www.lmh.org/aboutus/newsdetail.jsp?article_id=172

"The hospital started a phone line for the latest information locally. The number is 505-2327."

I urge you all to call that nifty number for the "latest information locally" according to them there are NO cases in the Lawrence/Douglas County area! Really?!?!

We are so screwed. Our own community hospital has not a CLUE.

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workinghard 4 years, 7 months ago

At least they didn't sweep it under the rug like Duke university did this summer when they had a flu outbreak. They sent kids back home but didn't test them to see if it was H1N1.

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seekeroftruth 4 years, 7 months ago

CDC Guidance for Responses to Influenza for Institutions of Higher Education during the 2009-2010 Academic Year

Excerpt from above document on CDC website for Pandemic Flu

[...Encourage hand hygiene and respiratory etiquette of both people who are well and those that have any symptoms of flu: Emphasize the importance of the basic foundations of flu prevention: stay home when sick, wash hands frequently with soap and water when possible, and cover noses and mouths with a tissue when coughing or sneezing (or a shirt sleeve or elbow if no tissue is available).

Routine cleaning

* Establish regular schedules for frequent cleaning of high-touch surfaces (for example, bathrooms, doorknobs, elevator buttons, and tables).
* Provide disposable wipes so that commonly used surfaces (for example, doorknobs, keyboards, remote controls, desks) can be wiped down by students before each use.
* Encourage students to frequently clean their living quarters, including high-touch surfaces.

Considerations for specific student populations

* Review policies for study abroad programs, including accessing health services abroad and reporting illness to the IHE.
* Communicate plans, policies, and strategies to partner K-12 schools regarding “early/middle college” students, prospective student tours, and other K-12 students regularly on campus.
* Determine if special communication strategies are needed to meet the needs of students with disabilities.
* Remind health-care profession students to follow infection control guidance for health-care workers. Visit http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/clinicians for guidance for health care settings.

Under conditions with increased severity compared to spring/summer 2009

CDC may recommend additional strategies to help protect IHE students...]

For Complete Document:

http://www.flu.gov/plan/school/higheredguidance.html

see also:

http://voices.kansascity.com/node/5567

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CamandAddisonsmommy 4 years, 7 months ago

Please stay at home if your sick! My daughter is immunesupressed and any flu could be bad on her. So if your sick or if your kids are sick stay at home!

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jogger 4 years, 7 months ago

ummmm.....

Cleaning the buildings once in a while would help too....

Is the Wescoe stair rail still sticky?

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seekeroftruth 4 years, 7 months ago

KDHE Newsletters put out weekly...

http://www.kdheks.gov/olrh/H1N1/H1N1_081709.pdf

and today's:

http://www.kdheks.gov/olrh/H1N1/H1N1_082409.pdf

the main website addres is:

www.kdheks.gov

Yes, swine flu needs to be taken seriously since it disproportionately effects what is normally the healthiest demographic--young people --and they are DYING.

Please get educated about this and act accordingly.

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seekeroftruth 4 years, 7 months ago

Case count is 47 as of Sunday. It is important for everyone to realize they have a personal responsibility to all of the pregnant population, as well as, the very young and the very ill--to practice vigilant hygiene and get educated about this pandemic flu. Remember, there are many many people with chronic health conditions like transplant recipients, asthma, and those who have compromised immune systems or various reasons.

For more info:

www.kdhe.ks.gov

www.pandemicflu.gov

www.who.int

Do not be complacent because this H1N1 is NOT just the same 'ol flu. Just because YOU may recover fine or only get the "mild" version does not mean the pregnant woman or children sitting next to you at work/school/church --Fill-in-the-blank will not die or lose her child because you chose to run around spreading the flu because "it's just the flu". This is a novel strain and deserves to be treated like the serious health threat it is.

The University of Kansas needs to do right by all who work and attend class on its campus by posting information on all buildings anyone frequents reminding everyone of the health issue of swine flu and to use proper hygiene when coughing and sneezing and reminders to wash hands. If they can have signs reminding everyone not to bring food and drink into buildings they can at least put up some basic signage about H1N1 that the Kansas Department of Health provides on their website--it just needs to be printed and posted!

Trusting young kids with their first taste of freedom to self-isolate is utter nonsense.

If you are ignorant about swine flu-GET EDUCATED!

www.kdhe.ks.gov

www.pandemicflu.gov

www.who.int

KU Worker, Student, Spouse -and most importantly PARENT!

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thelonious 4 years, 7 months ago

Wow.....this is going to spread like wildfire in the dorms. Hopefully it will continue to be a mild illness for most people. If you have read the history of the 1918 outbreak, the parallels are eerie.

Said it last spring and I'll say it again....folks, if you are sick, stay home and away from other people until you get well.

BTW, a co-worker reported numerous admissions to the ER at LMH this weekend for "flu-like illnesses" and patients in the ER wearing masks. It's going to get bad.....

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parrotuya 4 years, 7 months ago

Propaganda? Hopefully, the H1N1 flu bug will have a taste for wacko conspiracy theorists and kindly remove them from our gene pool! Hail, the mighty Darwin!

DOWn, baby, DOWn!

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LA_Ex 4 years, 7 months ago

From the CDC's website:

How does novel H1N1 flu compare to seasonal flu in terms of its severity and infection rates?

With seasonal flu, we know that seasons vary in terms of timing, duration and severity. Seasonal influenza can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. Each year, in the United States, on average 36,000 people die from flu-related complications and more than 200,000 people are hospitalized from flu-related causes. Of those hospitalized, 20,000 are children younger than 5 years old. Over 90% of deaths and about 60 percent of hospitalization occur in people older than 65.

When the novel H1N1 outbreak was first detected in mid-April 2009, CDC began working with states to collect, compile and analyze information regarding the novel H1N1 flu outbreak, including the numbers of confirmed and probable cases and the ages of these people. The information analyzed by CDC supports the conclusion that novel H1N1 flu has caused greater disease burden in people younger than 25 years of age than older people. At this time, there are few cases and few deaths reported in people older than 64 years old, which is unusual when compared with seasonal flu. However, pregnancy and other previously recognized high risk medical conditions from seasonal influenza appear to be associated with increased risk of complications from this novel H1N1. These underlying conditions include asthma, diabetes, suppressed immune systems, heart disease, kidney disease, neurocognitive and neuromuscular disorders and pregnancy.

How severe is illness associated with novel H1N1 flu virus?

Illness with the new H1N1 virus has ranged from mild to severe. While most people who have been sick have recovered without needing medical treatment, hospitalizations and deaths from infection with this virus have occurred.

In seasonal flu, certain people are at “high risk” of serious complications. This includes people 65 years and older, children younger than five years old, pregnant women, and people of any age with certain chronic medical conditions. About 70 percent of people who have been hospitalized with this novel H1N1 virus have had one or more medical conditions previously recognized as placing people at “high risk” of serious seasonal flu-related complications. This includes pregnancy, diabetes, heart disease, asthma and kidney disease.

One thing that appears to be different from seasonal influenza is that adults older than 64 years do not yet appear to be at increased risk of novel H1N1-related complications thus far. CDC laboratory studies have shown that no children and very few adults younger than 60 years old have existing antibody to novel H1N1 flu virus; however, about one-third of adults older than 60 may have antibodies against this virus. It is unknown how much, if any, protection may be afforded against novel H1N1 flu by any existing antibody.

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planetwax 4 years, 7 months ago

This IS propaganda. Swine flu is nothing more than symptoms of ill-health, like the flu, like the cold, etc (all varying degrees of the same thing). If anything, these micro-organisms are merely looking for food, and likely of an acidic nature. When people are in declining health, their bodies have high acidity. So, let the bugs come clean up the mess. Flies never caused garbage.

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LA_Ex 4 years, 7 months ago

H1N1 actually has a slightly higher fatality rate that seasonal influenza. It is the responsibility of both types of flu patients to minimize their contact with the general public to lessen the spread. Not only because nobody wants another person to feel miserable, but both have HUGE financial impacts due to lost revenue and wages.

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craigers 4 years, 7 months ago

The regular flu is just as deadly.

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Paul Geisler 4 years, 7 months ago

I'm sure it's stupid until someone you know dies from it. No, it's not the leading cause of death in our country, but the H1N1 virus can kill, and the first confirmed death attributed to H1N1 was recently reported near Wichita, KS.

And since there are simple measures that people can take to limit the ability for this H1N1 virus to spread, why wouldn't you want to get this message out? Lord knows if they didn't take these actions and a student or faculty/staff member died from the H1N1 virus some of you'd probably be criticizing them for not doing more!

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bondmen 4 years, 7 months ago

One flu over the KU KU's nest - I guessed.

Beware men in white coats holding hypodermic needles high.

Mass evacuations, mass inoculations, or mass hysteria?

Everybody quick, to the cafeteria.

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hawkergirl 4 years, 7 months ago

I would enjoy room service! :)

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KEITHMILES05 4 years, 7 months ago

Just the stupid azz flu. BFD. Stop acting like it's a terroist act.

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