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Archive for Tuesday, August 18, 2009

Women dominate j-school enrollment

August 18, 2009

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Though it has typically been portrayed on film and television as a male-dominated industry, females have increasingly dominated journalism schools throughout the country.

At the Kansas University School of Journalism, enrollment is currently 70 percent female, according to the school’s dean, Ann Brill.

“I’m sure there are a couple of reasons for this,” Brill said. “It’s probably a right brain/left brain thing. That sounds sexist, but there’s some truth to it.”

Men tend to be drawn to more analytical majors such as engineering or business, whereas women enjoy the creativity that journalism allows for, she said.

“Another reason is probably because the salaries aren’t great,” Brill said. “A lot of men are more concerned with making money.”

Many women are more interested in a stable position in an attractive market, according to Jesse Trimble of Columbus, a 2009 journalism school graduate and summer editor at the University Daily Kansan.

“I think one of the reasons is a lot of women get into the j-school is they want go into advertising sales and television,” she said. “I know the market is attractive, they make a good salary, and it’s a pretty basic concept. If you can do that well, you have stability, and that’s attractive to a lot of females, especially because you can’t just be a housewife anymore.”

Another reason why there may be an increase in the number of women is that some of the professions requiring a journalism degree are attractive to women, Brill said.

“Certain professions — public relations and advertising — tend to attract women,” Brill said.

Though in recent years there has been an increase in the number of women in the journalism school, it was not always that way, Brill said.

“It used to be the opposite. Back in the ’70s and ’80s, there were more men than women,” she said.

Comments

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 5 years, 4 months ago

Another reason why there may be an increase in the number of women is that some of the professions requiring a journalism degree are attractive to women, Brill said.

“Certain professions — public relations and advertising — tend to attract women,” Brill said.


These fields have absolutely nothing to do with journalism.

jayhawks71 5 years, 4 months ago

"These fields have absolutely nothing to do with journalism."

Courses offered for Journalism Majors... JOUR 513 Principles of Advertising JOUR 523 Principles of Public Relations JOUR 568 Marketing and Media Research

Apparently they have SOMETHING to do with journalism...

scarletbhound 5 years, 4 months ago

Considering the atrocious dangling modifier in the lede of this story, I hope Brian Frederick is not a KU grad nor was his copy editor. John Bremner is spinning in his grave. This story was picked up by Romenesko on the Poynter site and that grammatical ignorance embarrasses anyone associated with the LJWorld.

jmadison 5 years, 4 months ago

Ann Brill meet former Harvard University President Lawrence Summers. His statement that men are better than women at math and science was met with incredulity by Harvard's faculty. Does Prof. Brill have empiric findings to support her statements?

abrill 5 years, 4 months ago

OMG! My own mother would chastise me if she thought I said such things. I hope readers of this story and my mother know I didn't say this stuff. When the freelancer asked me about the enrollment, this was a small part of the discussion, in which I said SOME people may say creativity has to do with right brain/left brain, but journalism engages the entire brain and while women are the majority of our enrollment, it could be more of a cyclical thing right now. Yes, starting salaries are low but I don't believe men -- or women -- are more concerned about making money than being creative.

Bob_Keeshan 5 years, 4 months ago

scarletbhound (Anonymous) says…

Considering the atrocious dangling modifier in the lede of this story, I hope Brian Frederick is not a KU grad nor was his copy editor.

I'm guessing you would be appalled to know that Mr. Frederick is a freelancer whose personal website pitches his services as both an editor and writer of copy.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 5 years, 4 months ago

"Courses offered for Journalism Majors… JOUR 513 Principles of Advertising JOUR 523 Principles of Public Relations JOUR 568 Marketing and Media Research

Apparently they have something to do with journalism…"

A newspaper also needs janitors, too-- does that mean the J-school should have this course offering, as well?--

JOUR 109 Wastebasket Emptying

BBQ_Sauce 5 years, 4 months ago

scarletbhound (Anonymous) says…

Considering the atrocious dangling modifier in the lede of this story, I hope Brian Frederick is not a KU grad nor was his copy editor. ––––––––––– I'm guessing you would be appalled to know that Mr. Frederick is a freelancer whose personal website pitches his services as both an editor and writer of copy.


Oh the horror! A dangling modifier, perhaps he should kill himself rather than have to live with the shame.

Obviously you two have no idea how newspapers function. Is the lede grammatically correct? Absolutely not, but many times copy is manipulated during the revising process and occasionally these things slip through. It's the copy editor's job to catch them. And even if he or she misses it, the section editor still has to sign off on it. But I suppose you've never overlooked anything at your job?

jmadison 5 years, 4 months ago

Thank you for the clarification, Prof. Brill.

WHY 5 years, 4 months ago

Journalism is about creativity??? Maybe this explains why some stories sound made up. I made the mistake of talking to a reporter once. When I read what he said I said, I never spoke to one again. Lesson learned.

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