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Archive for Thursday, November 13, 2008

Jones pleads guilty in Delaware Street shooting case

Lawrence teenager Kellam Jones says he is guilty of murder.

November 13, 2008, 11:12 a.m. Updated November 13, 2008, 3:21 p.m.

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A Lawrence teenager left court with tears in his eyes Thursday morning, after pleading guilty to felony second-degree murder for his role in a June 7 botched robbery that left two men dead.

As part of a plea deal - in which Kellam D. Jones, 17 - also pleaded guilty to attempted aggravated robbery and attempted aggravated burglary, prosecutors will request Jones be sentenced to 13 years and five months in prison. He'll be sentenced at 9 a.m. Dec. 19 by Douglas County District Judge Michael Malone.

Prosecutors said Jones, armed with a rifle, fired approximately eight shots and killed Roland Klundt, a 20-year-old Baker University student.

Jones and Gage Hauk, 18, had gone to Klundt's house, 1311 Del., to rob him of drugs and money, prosecutors said. Klundt shot and killed Hauk, who was armed with an air pistol, to try to stop the early-morning robbery in the east Lawrence neighborhood. Jones then fired at Klundt, hitting him in the neck and face, causing his death, said assistant district attorney Deborah Moody, who prosecuted the case alongside District Attorney Charles Branson.

Jones admitted to a recount of the events during Thursday's hearing.

"For him to be able to finally confirm that this is in fact what happened, I think does bring a little bit of closure into this for the family members and those involved," Branson said during an interview after the hearing.

Jones was initially charged as an adult with aggravated robbery and felony first-degree murder in the case and would have faced 20 years to life in prison if convicted of the murder charge. But, Branson said it was possible a jury could have found Jones guilty of lesser charges and that the plea guarantees Jones will "spend a significant amount of time in prison."

As part of the plea deal, prosecutors said they won't file charges against Jones for additional charges of robbery and burglary at the house. He also will not be charged for a misdemeanor possession of marijuana charge.

During Thursday's hearing, Jones was given the opportunity to talk privately with his family. He remained teary-eyed through the rest of the hearing. Friends and family of Jones and Klundt also were present for the plea.

After the hearing, Heather Hein, Klundt's mother, said she was not satisfied with the suggested sentence.

"I don't think there really is justice," a choked-up Hein said. "I really wouldn't have been satisfied even if he had gotten 20 years. But, at least he's going to prison."

The woman said she was proud of her son.

"There's a lot of people that loved Roland and thought a lot of him," said Hein. "He was a really good guy. He helped a lot of people in his life and he would've helped more."

Jones, who was 16 at the time of the crime, is being represented by Julia Spainhour, a defense attorney of the Northeast Kansas Conflict Office, and Kip Elliott. Spainhour had no comment while leaving the hearing.

Comments

KeepmewheretheLIGHTis 5 years, 5 months ago

Ok so I knew roland and i knew what he did, there were drugs involved believe you me. But dont dog on someone for trying to make an easy income. Im not saying thats the right thing todo by any means. I mean he got shot over money and drugs..that to me is the most rediculous thing you could ever do, threaten someone with thier life..over THAT??..it pisses me off. Roland was an amazing guy who didnt deserve this.."brunette7" jones killed Roland. your an idoit to think he didnt. get your facts straight. and read the artical back in june. my brother went to central with jones and trust me he doesnt have the best rep. Roland knew what he was doing and he knew that it came with consequnces and enemies, but the fact he died because someone else was being selfish and stupid carrying around a gun to rob soemone.. then after shooting them you run and LEAVE THE GUN?.. thats one of the big evidence.

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brunette7 5 years, 5 months ago

Why hasnt the dna evidence been brought forward to actually prove that he is guilty. The facts of this case are not adding up - from the ammount of bullets fired for the type of gun used to the whole "plea bargain." Personally I think this kid is taking the fall for someone else. He's not guilty... he took a plea bargain. The court system is crooked. Those who want justice... you're not going to get it until you find the real murderer... its not Jones. He's getting off easier than most because they just need someone to take the fall... read the story more carefully. He's going to lose over a decade of his life for a crime he didnt commit.

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jonas_opines 5 years, 5 months ago

So. . . we're now willing to suggest that if it wasn't him, it was his brother?I am aware that all involved knew each other, and no, I don't think they picked the house at random. There are a variety of potential reasons that this happened, but the simple Fact is that there were no drugs in the house. I'm willing to concede the potentiality that there were drugs being dealt, I suppose; I won't claim that it is impossible for it to have escaped my notice, but I personally would need more than the rumor from certain circles that this was the case, or the word of the kid that broke into the house. At times, the rumor circles in my high-school would have said that I was dealing drugs, because I acted weird in school and I dressed like I did drugs, apparently.

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BBFantastic 5 years, 5 months ago

The sentence sounds just right.

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shma033105 5 years, 5 months ago

jonasFirst off I am sorry for your loss. Secondly even the d.a. said it was for drugs and money. If he wasnt then his brother was. Do you really think they just randomly picked that house. They all knew each other and I highly doubt it was from the library were they should have all been. Plus it has been said by a number of others that frequent in that same circle. The only good to come from any of this is at least some of them have decided to get right, and for that their familys should be thankfull to all involved, because it was the highest price possible to pay for two of them, and a very high price for Jones.

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jonas_opines 5 years, 5 months ago

shma: He was my wife's cousin, where do you get your information? There's a large gap between making Roland the second coming and saying, as far as I know untruthfully, without any evidential support that I'm aware of, that he was selling drugs out of the house of some of my family.

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shma033105 5 years, 5 months ago

"Funny thing was, he actually didn't. No drugs in the house, and he didn't deal drugs. Don't believe everything you read in the paper or in the commentary"And just where did you get your info? In the right circles it was well know that was a drug house. Just because Klundt was an honor student and going to Baker didnt mean he walked on water. Hauk went to KCKCC and had got clean and been clean tell he relasped a week before this all happened. I have known this kid for many years and he had been fighting the drug battle for a while with the help from his loving family and friends, but thanks to the dealers like Klundt and many others it was just to available and so there were many lifes riped apart and a little girl will never know her daddy and 2 very smart people have lost their lives and a third who knows what will become of him.The whole thing was a bad situation, and I am tired of everyone making it sound like Klundt was all but the second coming.

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jonas_opines 5 years, 5 months ago

promitida (Anonymous) says:"Is everyone neglecting the fact that Klundt SHOT Hauk to prevent the theft of his DRUGS?"Funny thing was, he actually didn't. No drugs in the house, and he didn't deal drugs. Don't believe everything you read in the paper or in the commentary.

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somebodynew 5 years, 5 months ago

Yes, madmike, yes it is. Very well said.

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madmike 5 years, 5 months ago

Well, a punk killing a dope dealer and then getting prison himself. That is a win-win situation.

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somebodynew 5 years, 5 months ago

promitida - yes you are correct and people are overlooking (or not caring) about that aspect. But as much as I am against drug sellers - you shouldn't be attacked in your own house and served a death sentence by two other druggers. (By the cops maybe, but not two druggers.)

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jumpin_catfish 5 years, 5 months ago

Thirty years old (if that is the sentence) when he gets out. Doesn't seem right for murder.

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promitida 5 years, 5 months ago

Is everyone neglecting the fact that Klundt SHOT Hauk to prevent the theft of his DRUGS? I'm not justifying the incident, but Klundt is being made into a saint quite unjustifiably.

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gphawk89 5 years, 5 months ago

In tears because he was remorseful? Or more likely, in tears because he got caught doing something stupid?

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XEPCT 5 years, 5 months ago

Hauk went armed with an air pistol, which is a pretty clear indication that him and Jones were not PLANNING to kill anyone. I think this is a pretty clear cut 2nd degree murder case, although legally Jones could have been charged with Hauk's death, in this case the legal system operated exactly as it should.

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KeepmewheretheLIGHTis 5 years, 5 months ago

Without knowing Jones personally, I think that 13 years isnt enough...going into someone ELSES house to rob them armed?...with intent to..i mean what did he think was going to happen?..maybe he wasnt expecting a drug dealer to be smarter and keep some sort of pertection around although Roland died he is very missed and was a good person just trying to make an easy income. It pisses me off that someone would go into anothers house intending to threaten or take someones life away even at such a young age over something so stupid money (paper) and drungs...its sad i hate to think about it but its life and reality..what life has become these days.Jones is living with 13 years (not enough) and the guilt that he survived this horrible incident and he took a wonderful persons life away. thats totally unfair. ronda yeah people make stupid decisions but to go as far as to take someone elses life?..get over yourself. if only you knew Roland and the life he was already living!

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Quigly 5 years, 5 months ago

I don't know what you are on Ronda, but i want some. If whatever you are taking can distort reality like that it makes me wish the Grateful Dead were around. He is a punk murderer and as long as this poster board is up I will be here saying the same thing. He killed. He knew what he was doing from the moment they walked up to that house. If you weren't going to kill why did you have the gun?For Fear factor. The moment he put that gun in his hand he intended to kill. That is what the gun is for. KILLING! As far as I am concerned he meant to do it. He was a punk ans will always be a punk. Now he is going to be Bubba's punk boy. And when he gets out he will still be Bubba's punk boy. And when he gets sentenced I will be there to let him know this will never be over!!!!! Every parole hearing I will be there. As long as he lives it will always be unfair.

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jonas_opines 5 years, 5 months ago

"I wish I could have tasted his tears as they ran down his face. He is going to rot in prison and when he gets out he gets another chance at life? not acceptable. Life for a life."Wow. Hateful much?

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ku_tailg8 5 years, 5 months ago

I agree with Quigly. Don't you people remember what it was like to be 16? You definitely know right from wrong. Especially when it comes to b&e and eventually murder. Now I'm not saying all 16 year olds are the sharpest tools in the shed. If a kid breaks curfew, then yes, its just a 16 year old being a 16 year old. But this is clearly a moral decision that he chose wrongly. Gosh at 16, you can have a license and a job. You are smart enough to know to show up for work on time and stop at red lights but robbing and killing someone is out the window?

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Ronda Miller 5 years, 5 months ago

I am just saying that children - and legally this boy was not an adult - should not be tried under the same guidelines as adults. It has become known in the past year or two that their brains do not fully development until they are around twenty five years of age. That is a long time past sixteen. Just think of how much you learned in one month, one year - let alone ten years. We can not expect someone who has the thinking capacity of a child to think as an adult. Have you talked to a teen lately? I don't care how smart they are, how responsible they are, they do not think the same way that an adult brain does. I would think that this young man reacted - there is the flight or fight response. HIs gut unfortunately told him to fight - that makes him a sorry situation that left a second person dead. Was he doing something he shouldn't have done in the first place, yeah, but that shouldn't make him a murderer for life.

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Quigly 5 years, 5 months ago

When did 16 become a child that knows no better. You all are crazy and as far as I am concerned part of the problem. I wish I could have tasted his tears as they ran down his face. He is going to rot in prison and when he gets out he gets another chance at life? not acceptable. Life for a life.

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justthefacts 5 years, 5 months ago

When someone admits their guilt (pleads guilty) it usually means (a) the defendant &/or their attorney know they stand a good chance of losing at trial and/or (b) in return the prosecutor will negotiate and agree to pursue lesser/fewer charges. The prosecutors often press for such a plea deal b/c it takes the element of CHANCE out of the equation, and insures that there will at least be SOME time served (as opposed to an expensive trial with no guaranteed outcome). Judges take a plea into consideration when sentencing. Since crazy Romona has yet to admit her guilt, and forced everyone to go thru a trial, it is highly likely that played into her getting the maximum possible sentence. Sometimes, the smartest thing a defendant can do (for all concerned) is to plead guilty and admit what they did.

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TheEleventhStephanie 5 years, 5 months ago

sarahsmilehawk--What's the SJHS curse?

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sarahsmilehawk 5 years, 5 months ago

A 16-year-old knows the difference between wrong and right, but that doesn't mean he's endowed with the same judgment we expect from adults.What I don't understand is how you can try a child as an adult without a jury of his peers. Obviously his peers ALSO have limited judgment and could not be trusted to serve as a jury. So why is the defendant held to a higher standard? I'm clearly not a lawyer, but this bugs me.

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Eybea Opiner 5 years, 5 months ago

Ronda Miller (Ronda Miller) says: "Our legal system needs to stop treating people under legal age as adults during trials."My solution to juvenile crime and punishment would be to treat every juvenile crime as if it had been committed by an adult through trial and sentencing. Then, I would have a special parole board monitor the rehabilitation (or lack thereof) of the child and, at age 21, make a recommendation as to parole or not. If a child seems to have responded well to rehab, let him out with the proviso that any future crime would result in reinstituting the original sentence. If he seems to want to be a "hard @ss" let him serve the entire sentence.

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Quigly 5 years, 5 months ago

Whatever RONDA. He was a man when he pulled that trigger. no mercy. 13 years isn't even close enough for that punk. He deserves to DIE

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somebodynew 5 years, 5 months ago

Well, OTR, with you I can agree. This is indeed a very sad situation for all involved. And I feel for the families, but there are consequences for your actions in this life. (And that includes all involved.)

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somebodynew 5 years, 5 months ago

justbegintowrite - BS, BS, BS!!!!! I agree with the 8 year old thing in your post. But, 16 or 17 just isn't what it used to be. "Kids" grow up so much earlier and have the same life experiences earlier than they used to. I am quite sure this isn't the first time this "kid" did something he knew was wrong, and he didn't participate in this because he didn't know any better. From what I have read (don't know him personally) he had a rough life, and had to grow up young. He MADE the choice to participate in an adult crime and to pull the trigger. If he was a "kid" he could have just thrown the gun down and run home crying. If he is going to act like an "adult" then he gets the honor of being treated as one for the consequences of his actions. "Stupid, reckless things on occasion" are one thing - Taking a gun to rob someone is not stupid and reckless - it is a crime and a thought out crime. He is being treated as he should be. (And just so you know, I am not acquainted with or related to either of the victims in this deal.)

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Ronda Miller 5 years, 5 months ago

Our legal system needs to stop treating people under legal age as adults during trials. This crime was horrible, the outcome was the loss of two young lives, as well as the horrific knowledge that this young man has to live with the fact that he killed someone and one of his closest friends was killed for the rest of his life. He is young, he made worse than a stupid mistake, but he is not, was not, an adult and should not be charged as one. His brain does not think like an adult's brain or he would likely not have gone along that evening. Young people do very stupid, reckless things on occasion - they should be given help, they should never be tried as an adult. In the case over the weekend where the eight year old boy shot his father and his father's friend, they are thinking of trying him as an adult. It is wrong. No eight year old thinks like an adult... No sixteen year old thinks like an adult. Heck, a lot of adults don't think as adults.....It is early on, but hopefully Klundt's family will eventually be able to forgive and find peace in their lives. I'm sorry for everyone's loss in this event.

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macon47 5 years, 5 months ago

poor kid,stupid stunt to pullthought it would be coolto bad his family doesnt havethe money ore the backing to gift him a get out of jail free cardmurder is murderexcept in the eyes of the courtsand the attorneys

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Steve Jacob 5 years, 5 months ago

It's probably is not enough, but being 17 or 18 when the trial begins, crying to a judge and jury, saying everything was the older kids idea, I don't blame the deal. 13 years for sure is not a light sentence.

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Multidisciplinary 5 years, 5 months ago

genuismanThat's never been suggested, she was never accused of that, and certainly wasn't convicted of that. But perhaps you have some "inside info."---If I recall from previous statements from the road crew..The first time she drove through, she cam very close to one of the workers who happened to have a cup of coffee in his hand, which he threw at her van.It was surmised that it ticked her off, and she came back to seek revenge.So to some folks, that's premediated murder.

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sarahsmilehawk 5 years, 5 months ago

13 years seems appropriate. When you're 17 years old, 13 years feels pretty much like a life sentence. He'll probably have some opportunity to learn some job skills while he's in prison and maybe--however unlikely--be able to contribute to society when he gets out. The statistics are not with him on that one, but sometimes the system works.Roland was a nice kid who will be truly missed.Not to be creepy or anything, but I do believe his death is part of the SJHS curse. Good riddance to that building.

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Danimal 5 years, 5 months ago

13 years is a long time, but not considering the crime. Everyone makes mistakes, but not everyone shoots someone 8 times and kills them when they do. Death penalty, putting him in prison will only turn him into a professional criminal, 13 years of crime school... And getting raped of course. Actually the death penalty might be best for everyone, victims family feels like they get closure and the accused gets out of years of physical and sexual abuse.

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geniusmannumber1 5 years, 5 months ago

"then there is morgan who is older and supposed to have more sound judgement, but she reacted out of anger and returned to a scene specifically with the intent of running people over with her car."That's an interesting take. That's never been suggested, she was never accused of that, and certainly wasn't convicted of that. But perhaps you have some "inside info."

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areyouserious 5 years, 5 months ago

Enjoy bubba, you waste of teenager space!

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Quigly 5 years, 5 months ago

LIFE FOR A LIFE! NOTHING LESS!!!

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Jaylee 5 years, 5 months ago

tricky predicament... jones was armed and breaking and entering not with the intent to, but prepared to shoot someone, not necessarily with the intent of killing them. (though you are pretty dumb to not expect that to happen when firing a rifle at close range, but one can assume that having taken a bulky rifle into a house, it was his only option as a weapon)then there is morgan who is older and supposed to have more sound judgement, but she reacted out of anger and returned to a scene specifically with the intent of running people over with her car. i dont think we can assume that this case was one where death of an invidividual was not on the mind.its just hard to say which of these two murder cases is being more justly prosecuted. it is, however, apparent to me that both of these individuals require a great deal of mental examination and some real guidance.

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radicool12 5 years, 5 months ago

the judge has the final say so in what he serves and i hope the judge makes the right decision i mean he took a life and honestly i think we need to think about this if it was you kid that got killed you would want to see the one who killed him in prison for life i mean i would but some of us dont have a say so in some cases if i were the judge it would be life in prison with parole option in 30 years

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Mike Blur 5 years, 5 months ago

Deb, Morgan and Jones got essentially the same sentence. The primary difference is that Morgan killed two people and Jones killed one, and she's serving the two sentences consecutively.Quigly, show some intelligence when posting. There was no jury, and the judge followed the sentencing grid after the plea agreement was reached. It's an idiotic and kneejerk reaction to blame a non-existent jury and a judge who, because of the plea deal only had to dole out the sentence according to the sentencing grid. Plea agreements are made between the prosecuting attorney and the defense.

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consumer1 5 years, 5 months ago

Chances are, by the time he gets out he will be a very hardened 30 year old convicted murderer. He will be getting his doctorate in criminology. From the prison perspective. Which could make him a very dangerous man in his 30's.

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Paula Kissinger 5 years, 5 months ago

Guys...read the story. He hasn't been sentenced yet...the 13 years is not a done deal...that's just what his attorney asked for. His sentencing is in December. He could get that...or more...or less.Again...pay attention Lawrencians at election time when you are addressing the judges section...

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starbucks 5 years, 5 months ago

DAs in Lawrence are as corrupt as the system.

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jonas_opines 5 years, 5 months ago

13 years is hardly a hand-slap for a 17 year old kid. To go from a minor to 30 on the inside, if he served his full sentence. But really, if the deal was not made, it was possible that the whole mess could have gone back to juvenile courts, and the sentence would likely be less.

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Quigly 5 years, 5 months ago

BULL!!!! 13 YEARS? WHAT A SCAM. HE DESERVES LIFE. WHAT A JOKE. JUDGE AND JURY AND EVERYONE INVOLVED SHOULD BE ASHAMED. NO JUSTICE WAS SERVED HERE. HE DESERVES HARD TIME NOTHING LESS!! NO DEAL NO MERCY. GREAT JOB DA, YOU BASICALLY SLAPPED HIS HAND AND LET HIM GO. THANKS DOUGLAS COUNTY. FOR NOTHING!

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Chris Ogle 5 years, 5 months ago

He was 16 when he committed murder. It's a tough call. Regardless of age, he took someones life. However, he may be young enough to turn things around. Too bad his victim doesn't have that option.

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1029 5 years, 5 months ago

This kid should have been smarter. Why kill someone with a gun and risk going to jail when you could kill him with your car and get probation instead? If Jones had waited in his car until Klundt left his house, he would have been able to run him over, leave the scene, and then turn himself in the next day and get a year or two of probation. Instead, this kid is going to jail because he apparently forgot that he was in Lawrence. Unbelievable. What a moron.

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Norma Jeane Baker 5 years, 5 months ago

Looks like Jones got off easy: 13 1/2 years for killing a man, intentionally. Jones fired five to eight times?

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Deb Stavin 5 years, 5 months ago

Just wondering: If he had pleaded "not guilty" and was then brought to trial and found guilty of second degree murder plus the aggravated attempted robberies... what would have been the maximum possible sentence?I find it interesting that this murderer was sentenced to half as much jail time as Ramona Morgan.--Deb Stavin

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