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Archive for Saturday, October 27, 2007

Project teaches sixth-graders importance of environment

October 27, 2007

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Wetlands tour sponsored by two local organizations

Seventy Hillcrest sixth-graders toured the Baker-Wetlands Friday morning thanks to a project sponsored by two Lawrence organizations. Enlarge video

Rex Powell, a board member for the Jayhawk Audubon Society, points out a bucket holding tadpoles to Hillcrest School sixth-graders on a field trip Friday to the Baker Wetlands. The students learned about biodiversity and the wetlands, thanks to a partnership between the Jayhawk Audubon Society and Kaw Valley Heritage Alliance/StreamLink.

Rex Powell, a board member for the Jayhawk Audubon Society, points out a bucket holding tadpoles to Hillcrest School sixth-graders on a field trip Friday to the Baker Wetlands. The students learned about biodiversity and the wetlands, thanks to a partnership between the Jayhawk Audubon Society and Kaw Valley Heritage Alliance/StreamLink.

Hillcrest School sixth-graders walk through colorful vegetation Friday on their field trip to the Baker Wetlands. The students learned about macro-invertebrates, wetlands history, botany, movement and water chemistry during the trip.

Hillcrest School sixth-graders walk through colorful vegetation Friday on their field trip to the Baker Wetlands. The students learned about macro-invertebrates, wetlands history, botany, movement and water chemistry during the trip.

The drizzling rain Friday morning provided the perfect setting for 70 Hillcrest School sixth-graders who were learning about wetlands.

"Come on, baby, move," said Mercy Mwangi as she looked at a tadpole inside a jug that had just been pulled from the water.

She and her classmates were on a two-hour field trip that was part of the Wakarusa Wetland Learners project. It was sponsored by the Jayhawk Audubon Society and the Kaw Valley Heritage Alliance/StreamLink.

The field trip consisted of five stations covering different topics: macro-invertebrates, Wakarusa Wetlands history, botany, movement and water chemistry.

"Our goal is to just keep increasing people's awareness of all ages that natural environments are crucial to our lives," said Sandy Sanders, project coordinator and a member of the Jayhawk Audubon Society Education Committee. "We feel like the more people who understand that and the earlier in life that they understand it, the more likely they are to preserve and conserve and really care for and appreciate those environments."

The field trip provided insight for the students.

"There are ... either 417 or 471 plants and only a handful of them haven't been used by Native Americans in some way," said student Ethan Ward.

Classmate Grace Huang said she learned about the plants and history.

"I learned that the wetlands used to be really big but the people drained the water out," she said.

So far, eight schools and 428 Lawrence students have participated in the project. It is funded by a $4,000 grant from the Elizabeth Schultz Environmental Fund, which runs out in June. New funds are being sought to continue the project.

For more information about the project, call Sanders at 841-4807.

Comments

BigPrune 6 years, 5 months ago

Forget the environment and teach children how to save money, manage money, balance a check book, and emphasize not borrowing money to make purchases. This needs to start at a very early age. Our country will be in economic ruins if things don't change.

If our children can be brainwashed about the environment, why not brainwash them about using money the right way.

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KsTwister 6 years, 5 months ago

Frogs mating this time of year is probably why they can't find Agnes anymore, I hope the frogs don't teach the remaining species.

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Confrontation 6 years, 5 months ago

This is a great opportunity for the kids to learn about being outside. Many kids only see the outside during recess or to and from the bus. After all, it's a little difficult to enjoy the outdoors when your life is spent attached to a video game controller. There's nothing wrong with teaching these kids to respect nature and that there's something more important than Hannah Monstupid.

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fetch 6 years, 5 months ago

dorothyhr: Yes some of this land needed to have drainage done for best farming......but not all of it or even most of it, Dorothy. Stuff your snide comments and instead do some actual research.

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tangential_reasoners_anonymous 6 years, 5 months ago

"There are ... either 417 or 471 plants...."

hmm... transposition or transplantation?

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Dorothy Hoyt-Reed 6 years, 5 months ago

What part of history don't you understand fetch. I realize it happened before you were born, but the world really did exist then. The wetlands were there before farmers rearranged earth and drained them. Then they farmed them for years. Then the earth was rearranged again to return the wetlands. Now just because you think the world only exists for your petty little needs, you were blinders so that you don't have to face the true history of that area. Duh, we were a colony of Great Britian, why don't we speak British? Duh. READ HISTORY!

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SettingTheRecordStraight 6 years, 5 months ago

More like "Project Hopes to Turn 6th Graders into Environmentalist Wackos"

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fetch 6 years, 5 months ago

look kids. this is what happens when you take farmland and make an artificial wetland out of it. Not only that, but since we are among the very few that ever come here, it is a newspaper picture event.

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Dorothy Hoyt-Reed 6 years, 5 months ago

We've had a very warm fall. I heard frogs croaking last night, If they are still croaking they are still mating. It's too bad that the KDOT, the city commission, and the feds want to take this place away from us. But they will still have a fight. They've spent so much money, they could have built 20 bridges across the Wakarusa. What is the real issue. Who owns the land that's to be developed north of the river? Who owns the mcmansions south of the river? Enquiring minds want to know.

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KsTwister 6 years, 5 months ago

You can get me to believe many things but "tadpoles" in October isn't one of them.

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