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Local Mac fan buys into Apple CEO’s tactics

October 14, 2007

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Three Questions with ... Brian Best, chief executive officer of Lawrence-based Best Macs Inc.

Brian Best, chief executive officer of Lawrence-based Best Macs Inc., answers three questions about Apple's new Leopard system, the company's standing as a computer maker and reasons behind the fierce loyalty shown by Mac devotees. Enlarge video

Brian Best bought his first Mac - a Macintosh Classic, with a 9-inch black-and-white monitor - back when Kansas University was winning its last national basketball championship, so he's plenty familiar with how fans can be a bit proprietary when it comes to a team or product they worship.

But Best, a self-described Mac "fan boy," draws the line at supporters who criticize the $140 billion company for simply protecting its home court of products and services by limiting customers' abilities to install new programs, opt for alternate subscription services or otherwise deviate from CEO Steve Jobs' corporate playbook.

Just because you buy an iPhone, Best said, doesn't mean you should expect Apple to let you run up the score at the expense of current or future Apple products, services or partnerships.

"It's not necessarily fair to expect Apple to support a third-party hack," said Best, chief executive officer of Lawrence-based Best Macs, which provides repair and installation services in northeast Kansas. "They're a business. Anybody who thinks they're not a business is crazy.

"They're looking at the bottom line."

Best bought an iPhone at full price on the day it came out, then watched as Jobs cut prices to boost sales. And Best didn't mind a bit, saying that having "a cool factor going on for two solid weeks" was well worth it.

Besides, he used the $100 rebate given to him by Apple after the fact to defray the expense of buying another Mac product, an iBook laptop.

"I ended up spending another $900," Best said, with a smile.

Perhaps Jobs does know what he's doing.

Comments

gccs14r 7 years, 2 months ago

Apparently. "Man drinks corporate Kool-aid. Film at 11."

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 7 years, 2 months ago

I think it's the JDub's attempt at a local tie-in to this story.

compmd 7 years, 2 months ago

"All of apples products suck." -b3

Cheap, high-performance, UNIX machines. The only company that satisfies all three is Apple. This is especially true with laptops. As much as I'd love a Naturetech or even the short lived Sun Ultra 3 running Solaris, they are beyond most people's budgets.

The RISC based high performance UNIX workstation market has been HP, Sun, SGI, and IBM for many years. Apple got in there and had great machines that were significantly more affordable than the competition. I for one think the Apple G5 died too early. Its processor lives on in the IBM Intellistations, but the starting price for one of those is $6,000.

compmd 7 years, 2 months ago

"It's not necessarily fair to expect Apple to support a third-party hack,"

It is fair to expect them to not booby trap a device that you own to self-destruct if you use it in a manner which they do not approve. In fact, the law says they have to support it.

Ugh, always makes me sick to my stomach to watch [any] fanbois blow money on bad products, or replacing products that don't need replacing. I'm going to fire up my old Macs today as a way of standing up to this nonsense.

compmd's Apple Army:

-Macintosh SE/30 -Macintosh LC -Powerbook 140 -Macintosh IIsi -Powerbook 190 -PowerMac 6100/66 -PowerMac 7600/120 -Power Computing PowerCenter Pro 210 (416MHz G3) -Motorola StarMAX 4000/160 - (2) Blue/White Macintosh G3 (400MHz)

Four of those machines will run Marathon no problem. LAN party at compmd's place.

timetospeakup 7 years, 2 months ago

"Besides, he used the $100 rebate given to him by Apple after the fact to defray the expense of buying another Mac product, an iBook laptop."

No he didn't. They don't make iBook's anymore. And Apple only sells new stuff directly, which is the only place his rebate was good. So no way he bought one from the proceeds of the iPhone rebate

ksteacher 7 years, 2 months ago

"All of apples products suck."

Have you actually used one more than once?

Podesta 7 years, 2 months ago

The MacBook/iBook confusion likely arose at the copy desk. I am sure Rich knows the updated name for Apple consumer laptops.

An Apple credit coupon can be used to buy any Apple product. The confused commenter is likely mistaking the iTunes card workaround (buy an Apple gift card and use it to buy an iTunes card) as applying to computers. The iTunes workaround is necessary for accounting reasons.

Apple's prices have become quite competitive. A MacBook Pro can be purchased for $1,999, less if you have an educational or other discount.

Like most iPhone owners, I have no desire to hack my device or add unauthorized applications to it.

Sent from my iPhone.

compmd 7 years, 2 months ago

""PCs" can run most *NIX derivatives identically. "

While architecturally this is true, you run into the problem of hardware support. You cannot ensure identical operation in a batch of PCs running a "*NIX derivative" unless they are all identical. The problem is there are myriad options with PCs. Yes, I realize the irony of claiming "hardware support" as a good reason to use an Apple machine. There are times however when you absolutely must have consistency and ensured operation. If you know what an Ultra 3 is I know you know this to be true.

There were two distinct models of the Ultra 3. You are correct, the base model started around $3000, but the higher end model which was more comparable to a MacBook Pro was close to $9000.

I'm no mac fanboy, but I have to give credit where it is due.

"Sent from my iPhone"

...at 1/10 the speed I sent this with my two year old HTC Apache. :)

Podesta 7 years, 2 months ago

Well, I'm not a stingy person. Of course I could get a less expensive laptop than a MacBook Pro. Ditto for my iPhone. However, I am pleased with both. I appreciate the discounts Apple provided, but would have paid full price if necessary.

Sent from my iPhone -- using Wi-Fi.

gccs14r 7 years, 2 months ago

"Apple's prices have become quite competitive. A MacBook Pro can be purchased for $1,999, less if you have an educational or other discount. ... Sent from my iPhone."

Read on a 6-month-old $399 laptop running Vista. I haven't paid $2k for any computer, including my Sun, and I don't plan to, either.

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