Advertisement

Archive for Wednesday, March 7, 2007

Women in leadership ‘no longer a big deal’

March 7, 2007

Advertisement

Former U.S. Sen. Nancy Kassebaum Baker speaks Tuesday at the Dole Institute of Politics on the Kansas University campus. Kassebaum Baker's lecture was entitled "The Impact of Women's Leadership: Challenges Ahead." The speech was followed by a 20-minute question-and-answer period with an audience of several hundred in attendance.

Former U.S. Sen. Nancy Kassebaum Baker speaks Tuesday at the Dole Institute of Politics on the Kansas University campus. Kassebaum Baker's lecture was entitled "The Impact of Women's Leadership: Challenges Ahead." The speech was followed by a 20-minute question-and-answer period with an audience of several hundred in attendance.

Nancy Kassebaum Baker

For Nancy Kassebaum Baker, there's one overarching positive aspect about women having served as a U.S. Secretary of State, speaker of the House and one being a strong contender for a presidential nomination.

"The good thing is it's no longer a big deal," Kassebaum Baker told a crowd of more than 300 at the Dole Institute of Politics.

Kassebaum Baker, the 19-year former senator from Kansas, returned to Kansas University, where she earned a political science degree, to give the Emily Taylor and Marilyn Stokstad Women's Leadership Lecture.

Her father, former Kansas Gov. Alf Landon, who ran for president in 1936, once questioned what Kassebaum Baker would be able to do with a political science degree.

It would play a small part in her becoming the first female senator who reached office without first having served in the House of Representatives or received an appointment to fill a deceased spouse's term.

The composition of the United States Senate has changed since she took office in 1978; now 16 women serve among 100 U.S. senators.

Kassebaum Baker helped pen health care legislation as a senator, and she took questions from the audience about the subject.

The first: If Kassebaum Baker were in charge, how would she achieve universal health care in the United States?

Kassebaum Baker said that was a similar debate that the Senate had 14 years ago. The answer, she said, is in finding some way to pay for health care coverage for an entire country.

"There has to be a way to combine what's worked in the U.K. and what hasn't worked," she said, referring to Great Britain's public care system.

"It will be interesting to see what Massachusetts and California do with their initiatives and see what we can learn from them."

Kassebaum Baker's lecture, which lasted about an hour, was worth the time for one Lawrence resident who's long admired the former senator.

Joe Spradlin said he appreciated what he called Kassebaum Baker's positive attitude and "her ability to break from the (Republican)party when it was in the country's best interests to do so."

Comments

pelliott 7 years, 1 month ago

job well done, competent, intelligent, reliable, and she is a woman. The "AND' is old news. Nothing to do with the feminism movement except it help pass the laws to help outlaw stupidity to reign. If a person does a job, does it well and reliably it should be enough. Studies of many things have helped a lot of stereotypes to bite the dust or shine for the foolishness they are.
I do find it funny that there are still people who read this and jump up and down about feminism , sad. I remember my Dad, when asked why he made a black man foreman over a white crew, who agreed that his black foreman was black, but it didn't matter, the damn guy got the job done. Times change but not much.

0

jimincountry 7 years, 1 month ago

Sure , the country's been achieving so much since the feminism movement brought "women's Studies" to our universities............WHAT IS IT THE STUDIES HAVE DONE FOR THE USA?!

0

Commenting has been disabled for this item.