Advertisement

Archive for Friday, June 22, 2007

Sunrise ceremony designed to help save wetlands

June 22, 2007

Advertisement

The Public was invited to attend a Sunrise Ceremony at the Wakarusa Wetlands on Thursday as part of the National Day of Prayer to Protect Native American Sacred Places. The event was sponsored by Save the Wakarusa Wetlands Inc. and the Morning Star Institute.

The Public was invited to attend a Sunrise Ceremony at the Wakarusa Wetlands on Thursday as part of the National Day of Prayer to Protect Native American Sacred Places. The event was sponsored by Save the Wakarusa Wetlands Inc. and the Morning Star Institute.

Group gathers to observe national day of prayer

About 20 people gathered this morning at the Haskell-Baker Wetlands for a ceremony to observe the 2007 National day of Prayer to protect Native American sacred places. Enlarge video

Last year, Paige Stonerock attended the sunrise ceremony on the first day of summer, and the group was greeted by deer.

"It was like everything came together at once to say, 'This is an incredible place,'" said Stonerock, a Lawrence resident.

While no deer made an appearance this year, it didn't stop nearly 20 people from sharing stories and prayers with each other Thursday morning. Lawrence resident Jeremy Shields sang a song to greet the sun and the group formed a circle to pass around a tobacco offering while greeting one another.

Thursday morning's ceremony, sponsored by Save the Wakarusa Wetlands Inc. and the Morning Star Institute, was in observance of the 2007 National Day of Prayer to Protect Native American Sacred Places. In its fourth year, it was one of 15 ceremonies to take place in the United States.

"There are ceremonies like this at some time during the day, usually at sunrise, on wetlands that are threatened like this," said Mike Caron, an advocate with the Save the Wakarusa Wetlands Inc.

The wetlands have been mired in controversy for the last few years, as the Federal Highway Administration has been trying to decide whether to extend the South Lawrence Trafficway through them.

Stonerock and the Save the Wakarusa Wetlands organization work on outreach programs to educate people about the area.

"Rest assured, we will be back next year," Caron said.

Comments

SaveWakarusaWetlands 6 years, 10 months ago

Most of the comments have indicated little or no knowledge of the issues involved or interest in the facts. Bluster and hateful bigotry are not going to get anyone far-faster or slowly. If you believe the wetlands are man-made you clearly know little about the draining of wetlands in the history of midwestern settlement. The few who actually care about knowing the truth might benefit from visiting www.savethewetlands.org under FAQ "Isn't this just a recent man-make wetland?" That, and other questions are answered fairly thoroughly for anyone who still has a mind open enough to see beyond the many myths this newspaper's publisher has helped developers and KDOT build around the SLT issue for two decades. By the way, there were 26 people who arose to greet the sun Thursday morning, and the youngest was 16 days old. We are not going away anytime soon.

0

fascinating_person 6 years, 10 months ago

commenters: You're all f_cking ridiculous.

0

Pilgrim 6 years, 10 months ago

cowboy (Anonymous) says:

Sacred Wetlands , home to religious ceremonies for months now , next there will be a prayer circle built.

did any one notice the large bulldozers and backhoes out there last week bulking up the dikes on the east side , natural my A$$ , wetlands courtesy of Caterpillar.


Flooded farmland with all the sanctity of a McDonald's.

0

cowboy 6 years, 10 months ago

Sacred Wetlands , home to religious ceremonies for months now , next there will be a prayer circle built.

did any one notice the large bulldozers and backhoes out there last week bulking up the dikes on the east side , natural my A$$ , wetlands courtesy of Caterpillar.

0

BorderRat 6 years, 10 months ago

Didn't Dr. Seuss write about the SLT/Wetlands impass in the story "The Zax?"

0

stuckinthemiddle 6 years, 10 months ago

monkeyhawk It may be. It's amazing what people can do if they put their heads and hearts into it... So for, they have won...

0

monkeyhawk 6 years, 10 months ago

Are those the same 20 people who have been standing in front of the bulldozers for all these years?

0

whydoyouask2dogs 6 years, 10 months ago

The dancing midgets were great!

In ancient times, hundreds of years before the dawn of history. There lived a strange race of people... No one knows who they were, or what they were doing... but their legacy remains... hewn into the living waters of the Wetlands...

The Wetlands, where the demons dwell Where the banshees live and they do live well The Wetlands Where a man is a man and the children dance to the pipes of pan The Wetlands Tis a magic place where the moon doth rise With a dragon's face The Wetlands Where the virgins lie And the prayer of devils fill the midnight sky And you my love, won't you take my hand We'll go back in time to that mystic land Where the dew drops cry and the cats meow I will take you there I will show you how

0

Dorothy Hoyt-Reed 6 years, 10 months ago

We live near the wetlands, and we have fewer mosquitos than when we lived by the hosipital. There is a nice healthy population of frogs in the wetlands who love eating mosquitos. Don't kill off the frogs with pesticides, and mosquitos are not much of a problem.

0

consumer1 6 years, 10 months ago

Darn nice of you to go out and feed those hungry mosquitos that have been previously dining on the carcass of a dead opossom. I am sure the fresh blood they got from you tasted mighty fine. Plus they are in tune with the one with nature thing, they don't just take from their provider, they leave you a little something for your trouble. HAPPY SCRATCHING I hope your all insured.

0

Commenting has been disabled for this item.