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Archive for Saturday, December 15, 2007

Panel calls for new emergency force

December 15, 2007

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— A legislative panel Friday recommended the establishment of a voluntary emergency response force but declined to endorse a state militia.

Members of the House-Senate Committee on Kansas Security said they would write legislation to set up the force for consideration of the Legislature, which starts its 2008 session in January.

Members of the committee said recent disasters, including this week's ice storm, have illustrated the need to augment local and state emergency responders.

"Resources at the local level get stretched," said state Rep. Lee Tafanelli, R-Ozawkie.

Tafanelli said if the state faced a pandemic or other statewide emergency, "That's not the time to think, 'Boy, we should've done this.'"

Under the proposal, volunteers would be trained by the Kansas Adjutant General Department to help during emergencies. They wouldn't receive pay, unless called to duty, committee members said. How much pay they would receive while on duty hasn't been worked out.

Members of the force would wear some kind of uniform, but they would not carry guns or have police powers, the committee recommended.

Earlier this year, the committee considered a proposal that would have set up a militia-type force that would have been trained in law enforcement and provided arms.

But the startup cost of $3.5 million was seen as too high. The Kansas National Guard testified against that proposal.

Comments

Richard Heckler 7 years ago

WE DO NOT NEED more military or police forces. This is thinking like Bush who has a tendency to waste money not only as a president but also as a Texas governor. People within communities help each other so leave matters alone.

Put the money into Vo-Tech Training.

Ragingbear 7 years ago

~~A legislative panel Friday recommended the establishment of a voluntary emergency response force but declined to endorse a state militia.~~

Interesting, the constitution already set up a force for this exact purpose. They are called the National Guard. But for some strange reason, the National Guard keeps getting sent overseas, which is not what they were meant for.

Joe Hyde 7 years ago

Merrill and Ragingbear both have it right.

This "need for a voluntary emergency response force" is the kind of desperate thing we contemplate when the President and the Congress send our career military force overseas to fight in a war that's never been officially declared; when the President and the Congress do not institute a civilian draft to reinforce the military; when each state's National Guard units get repeatedly rotated into foreign combat zones due to the exhaustion of the regular career force; when the President and the Congress continue to fund a war that uses money appropriated from our nation's next three generations.

timetospeakup 7 years ago

Ragingbear - where in the constitution is the national guard established? I can't find it there, maybe you can help me out

timetospeakup 7 years ago

Ragingbear you're an idiot, it says right there "The Militia Act of 1903 organized the various state militias into the present National Guard system."

That's only 116 years after the constitution was written

Mkh 7 years ago

You know, I actually see this as a very good thing. It seems at least from the brief article that this is neither a police or military force so I'm not sure what Merril is talking about.

I feel that local and State governments need to be prepared to take care of themselves when facing emergencies instead of relying on the fundamental disaster called FEMA.

When faced with a dire crisis do you all actually want to depend on FEMA and the federal government to help you? Ask the people of Greensburg Kansas or New Orleans what they think about FEMA. They'd probably tell you a group of anarchists can do a better job.

I think all states and communities need to become reliant more on themselves and prepare to be ready to act in a serious emergency.

A bit of a side note here, but it's relevant: How many of you are aware of the massive "detention centers" (i.e. concentration camps) that FEMA has been building across the USA for it's very own citizens? Once you realize what FEMA really has in the cards for the American people (also see Military Commissions Act), the proposed idea above seems like a reasonable one as a first step to getting rid of FEMA.

FEMA CONCENTRATION CAMPS: Locations and Executive Orders http://www.apfn.org/apfn/camps1.htm

Video of FEMA camp: www.youtube.com/watch?v=0P-hvPJPTi4

Ragingbear 7 years ago

Try reading the part about state militias that the Militia Act modified. Once again, go read the constitution. And that "We the People" thing isn't it. Nor is the preamble the Constitution.

Flap Doodle 7 years ago

I checked out the apfn site.

"There over 800 prison camps in the United States, all fully operational and ready to receive prisoners. They are all staffed and even surrounded by full-time guards, but they are all empty."

These are the camp sites listed for Kansas: "KANSAS Leavenworth - US Marshal's Fed Holding Facility, US Penitentiary, Federal Prison Camp, McConnell Air Force Base. Federal death penalty facility. Concordia - WWII German POW camp used to exist at this location but there is no facility there at this time. Ft. Riley - Just north of Interstate 70, airport, near city of Manhattan. El Dorado - Federal prison converted into forced-labor camp, UNICOR industries. Topeka - 80 acres has been converted into a temporary holding camp."

I don't think that Ft. Riley could be accurately described as empty. The BOP doesn't currently list any facility at El Dorado, KS. And why is Concordia listed as the location of a FEMA prison camp when the description says "...but there is no facility there at this time."

Is it all just a bunch of hooey?

A year ago, a rumor was flying around that Cheney would resign in the first week of January 2007. The President would appoint Jeb to be VP. Then the President would resign so Jeb could become President & pardon everybody. BTW, it was all a bunch of hooey.

A few folks got all lathered up because they started buying into their own fever dreams.

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