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Archive for Friday, August 17, 2007

Also from August 17

Audio clips
Births
Chats
Obituaries
On the street
Photo galleries
Game Aug. 13-17
Podcasts
Polls
KU is ranked 38th in the latest US News & World Report list. What do you think of that rank?

Poll results

Response Percent
It’s about right
 
35%
It’s too high
 
31%
It’s too low
 
29%
Undecided
 
3%
Total 563
Videos

Lead stories

4:58 a.m.
Brad Nichols, center, a carpenter with Culbertson Construction, works Thursday to secure wall supports of a home that he and his coworkers are building on Tucker Trail in northwest Lawrence. Home construction numbers in Lawrence are down, corresponding with a national trend. U.S. housing starts have reached a 10-year low, according to a federal report released Thursday. Building slump hits home
August 17, 2007 in print edition on 1A
Tim Stultz, who builds homes for a living, watches as three big economic indicators - inflation, unemployment and mortgage interest rates - continue hovering at traditionally low levels. Now, more than ever, he’s left wondering why the city’s long resilient home-construction industry has skidded to a career-long low. “Since I’ve been building this is the slowest I’ve seen it,” said Stultz, president of Highland Construction since 1991. “But we ought to be coming out of it - if people would just believe we’re going to come out of it.
9:00 a.m.
KU campus Ranking moves up to No. 38
August 17, 2007 in print edition on 1A
Kansas University moved up one spot to 38th in the 2008 rankings of public universities by U.S. News & World Report. This is the second year the university’s ranking has climbed since reaching a low of 45th in the 2006 rankings. The rankings, which hit newsstands Monday in the magazine’s annual “America’s Best Colleges” guide, are facing particularly vocal complaints this year from a group of colleges and educators working to develop an alternative to the system.
12:00 p.m.
Trivia scramble
August 17, 2007 in print edition on 1C
Redemption. Of the 16 teams to compete last month in VH1’s “World Series of Pop Culture,” only one walked away with the $250,000 prize. Fifteen other teams went home with nothing. Worse, they must now forever replay in their minds the questions and answers they screwed up.
3:00 p.m.
Pulse Podcast
Trout Fishing in America reels in kids' interest
Posted August 17, 2007
Keith Grimwood and Ezra Idlet write songs about ice cream, aliens in noses and beans and weenies. It's safe to say their songs are generally intended for children. But they hope parents might actually like the songs, too. The duo make up Trout Fishing in America, a three-time Grammy-nominated band that plays at 7 p.m. today at the Lied Center. The performance is the Lied's annual Family Concert. In this week's Pulse Podcast, Grimwood and Idlet talk about their songwriting process and where their crazy name came from. And, as always, find out what else is going on in Lawrence this weekend in our weekly Best Bets feature.

All stories

6Sports video: High school football practices through heat
August 17, 2007
Mother nature has not made the first week of football practice easy on the prepsters. Area schools worked out fo the first time on Monday in 102 degree temperatures.
6News vide: Dole Institute interim director named
August 17, 2007
KU selected an interim replacement to guide the Dole Institute of Politics. Jonathan Earle, an associate history professor and associate program director at the institute, will fill in for director Bill Lacy.
6Sports video: Local sluggers headed to major conference
August 17, 2007
Lawrence High and Free State High will each have alums playing baseball in major conferences at the division one level next season.
6Sports video: Fine ready for season
August 17, 2007
Not many Kansas receivers had better years in 2006 than tight end Derek Fine. The Jayhawks senior however feels like he should have done more. As a junior, the Salisaw, Okla. native caught a career best 28 calls for 355 yards, third best on the team.
6Sports video: Mangino attends football kickoff rally
August 17, 2007
Mark Mangino and the Kansas Jayhawks return to practice early tomorrow morning, but tonight coach spent the evening in Prairie Village with members of the Jayhawk nation. More than 3,500 ‘Hawk faithful attended tonight’s Kansas Football kickoff rally.
6News video: Former AG pushing for medical marijuana
August 17, 2007
Smoking pot - not to get high - but to ease the pain of illness. A big name in Kansas politics says people should have that right. We spoke with him and a patient fighting to make medical marijuana legal, even though it might be too late to help.
6News video: LPD put extra officers downtown this summer
August 17, 2007
Local bar owners say they want more police downtown, and the Lawrence PD gave it a try. For six weekends this summer, ten extra officers patrolled downtown Lawrence. This afternoon, we caught up with Sergeant Dan Ward, who led the team, , to find out what they did and what they saw during those 96 hours downtown.
6news video: Bridge opened with celebration
August 17, 2007
Members of two northeast Kansas communities came together for a celebration five months in the making. Since March, a construction project on the bridge spanning the Kansas River divided the towns of Perry and Lecompton.
6News video: KU increases national ranking
August 17, 2007
KU earned a top-40 ranking in a newly released record on public Universities. U.S News and World Report raks KU 38th in the 2008 pool, that’s up one spot form last year and marks the second straight year KU has climbed since falling to 45th place in 2005.
6News video: Haskell might charge for parking
August 17, 2007
Haskell Indian Nations University officials say they may charge for parking at high school football games. University officials say there is no official proposal on the table and add they are a long way from any decision.
6Sports video: Tongie looking for post-season play
August 17, 2007
We continue our run through prep football previews with Mark Elston’s Tonganoxie Chieftains. A year ago, THS was knocked out of post-season play after just one game. Now, a less experienced squad will be after a deeper run in 2007.
KU alum hired as new assistant city manager
August 17, 2007
Cindy Boecker, an assistant city administrator in Liberty, Mo., will be one of two assistant city managers to City Manager Dave Corliss. She starts Sept. 24.
6News Now: Kansas University ranked 38th in nation
August 17, 2007
In tonight’s 6News and tomorrow’s Lawrence Journal-World, KU earns a top ranking in the newly-released U.S. News rankings, and introducing the new interim director at the Dole Institute of Politics.
Stephan holds press conference for medical marijuana
August 17, 2007
Former Kansas Atty. Gen. Bob Stephan talks about his support for legalizing medical marijuana.
Couple tries to name baby with ‘at’ symbol
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A9
A Chinese couple seeking a distinctive name for their child settled on the e-mail ‘at’ symbol - annoying government officials grappling with an influx of unorthodox names.
Tropical Storm Erin brings torrential rains
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A9
The tropical weather season revved up Thursday as the Atlantic’s first hurricane formed and quickly strengthened, and as Tropical Storm Erin’s remnants soaked rain-weary Texas, snarling rush-hour traffic and killing at least two people.
Cards complete sweep of Brewers
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B8
Adam Wainwright gave up two hits in seven scoreless innings, and Yadier Molina put on a rare power display with two homers as St. Louis completed a three-game sweep of Milwaukee.
Commodities
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B11
¢ Chicago markets¢ Local markets¢ Nonferrous metals
On the Record
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A4
¢ Law enforcement report¢ Accidents¢ Emergency calls
Scientists overheated on climate
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A10
In every child’s life there comes a time when childhood fantasies are shattered and he or she is forced to accept reality - there is no Santa Claus or tooth fairy; parents don’t always mean it when they promise to stay married until parted by death.
Restrained role best for central banks
August 17, 2007
Exactly a century ago, panic seized financial markets. The collateral for perhaps half the bank loans in New York was securities whose values had been inflated by speculation. Then on Saturday night, Nov. 2, 1907, a 70-year-old man gathered some fellow financiers at his home at 36th and Madison in Manhattan. The next morning, a New York Times headline proclaimed: “BANKERS CONFER WITH MR. MORGAN Long Discussion in His LibraryNot Ended Until 4 O’Clock”
Master Woodsman takes a hike
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A11
What truly cheers me up through these dog days of summer is the thought that two old friends of mine are up north on a canoe trip in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area and that I am not there with them. I am here, reading the paper, and if I wanted to go to a movie, I could go, and if I wished to use a flush toilet, I could do that, too.
Assisting older parents could reduce taxes
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B11
Q: My mom died in November 2006 and my father’s health soon began to fail, so dad moved into my home in April of this year so that I could take care of him. I love him dearly and, for obvious reasons, I don’t ask him to pay any rent. I also pay for his food and spend a lot of time and money to drive him to and from his doctor a few times a week. Because dad lives with me now and I provide nearly all of his financial support, can I claim him as a “dependent” on my next tax return?
Wait over for ‘High School Musical 2’
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B10
The year’s most anticipated sequel hits the screens tonight. No, we’re not talking about another summer-movie “three-quel.” It’s finally time for “High School Musical 2” (7 p.m., Disney). The original film took many by surprise. Released like any other Disney Friday-night movie, it became a TV smash and a pop culture phenomenon among teens, ‘tweens and their parents, who were asked to purchase the resulting avalanche of “HSM” merchandise.
Superbad’ a hilarious, relatable romp
August 17, 2007 in print edition on C1
“Superbad” has been so super-ubiquitous, it only feels like it’s already been in theaters for months. Between the posters, TV commercials and promotional appearances by its stars, the hype machine has been in full force. Just ask anyone under 25 who McLovin is - they’ll immediately be able to tell you.
Trivia scramble
World Series of Pop Culture’ stars reunite in Lawrence for new brainteasing Scramble
August 17, 2007 in print edition on C1
Redemption. Of the 16 teams to compete last month in VH1’s “World Series of Pop Culture,” only one walked away with the $250,000 prize. Fifteen other teams went home with nothing. Worse, they must now forever replay in their minds the questions and answers they screwed up.
Boyda confident of gradual Iraq withdrawal
It will happen because that’s our only option’
August 17, 2007
Congresswoman Nancy Boyda, D-Kan., predicted Thursday morning that the wheels have been set in motion for a gradual withdrawal of U.S. military personnel from combat zones in Iraq. “We’re going to redeploy the troops because we don’t have another option,” said Boyda, a member of the U.S. House Armed Services Committee. “Our troop strength for all intents and purposes is gone. Our equipment, we haven’t called up the industrial base, so we’re not even keeping up with re-setting of our equipment.”
Strahan still unsure
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B5
New York Giants general manager Jerry Reese hasn’t talked to holdout defensive end Michael Strahan in a while and has no clue when he will make a decision on whether to retire.
Donaghy casts a shadow over NBA
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B2
What former NBA referee Tim Donaghy has brought upon the league will not soon disappear. Donaghy’s involvement in shady dealings will leave increased doubt and suspicion where many observers long have had them.
Braun, K.C. get win, 6-2
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B1
Ryan Braun needed 25 appearances before he collected his first major-league victory, but it was worth the wait. Braun pitched 22â3 innings of two-hit shutout relief, and Mark Teahen drove in the tiebreaking run on an eighth-inning fielder’s choice as the Kansas City Royals beat Texas, 6-2, Thursday night to snap the Rangers’ three-game winning streak.
Sisters of woman thrown from balcony wanted to keep her away from husband
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A5
Two sisters of Criste Reimer said Thursday that they had wanted to keep her away from her husband, who was charged this week with hurling her to her death. Criste Reimer, who was found dead Tuesday night outside her Country Club Plaza apartment, lived with her mother outside the Kansas City area for several months until mid-July, when Stanley Reimer visited and said he was going to take her to dinner. He took her away and never came back, said her sisters, Vicki Jones and Terri Metrano.
Judge won’t prevent purchase of Wild Oats
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A2
A federal judge Thursday gave the go-ahead for grocer Whole Foods Market Inc. to buy rival Wild Oats Markets Inc., rejecting government arguments the deal would stifle competition and lead to higher prices.
People in the News
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B10
¢ Max Roach, master jazz percussionist, dies at 83¢ Gwen Stefani wants more children, No Doubt¢ Forbes.com: Jay-Z earned $34M last year¢ Spears strikes a pose, but won’t interview
Old Home Town - 40 years ago
August 17, 2007
Local Soap Box Derby champion David Carpenter, of Ottawa, got the red carpet treatment when he arrived in Akron, Ohio, to take part in the national Soap Box finals. A wide variety of special events were planned for the racers and their families.
Building slump hits home
New housing construction slows
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A1
Tim Stultz, who builds homes for a living, watches as three big economic indicators - inflation, unemployment and mortgage interest rates - continue hovering at traditionally low levels. Now, more than ever, he’s left wondering why the city’s long resilient home-construction industry has skidded to a career-long low. “Since I’ve been building this is the slowest I’ve seen it,” said Stultz, president of Highland Construction since 1991. “But we ought to be coming out of it - if people would just believe we’re going to come out of it.
Planned hotel’s size still an issue
No consensus yet on ‘Eldridge on the Hill’
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A3
Size continued to be an issue for the designers of a seven-story hotel development project as they sought approval from the Historic Resources Commission Thursday night at City Hall. Their revised plans that added height to the project, dubbed “Eldridge on the Hill,” didn’t get them closer to an answer. The commission could not reach an agreement and deferred it until its next monthly meeting for further review.
LOYO art show called off this year
August 17, 2007 in print edition on C1
Just when it was starting to become a local institution, the Lawrence Own-Your-Own Art Show has been called off. For this year, anyway. Organizers made the decision in late July to cancel the exhibition due to inadequate financial support from the community, and mailed out postcards last week notifying artists, patrons and others.
Lawrence Datebook
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A4
Events around Lawrence
KSU grad Diles impressing Texans
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B5
Zac Diles wasn’t expected to play a very big role in coach Gary Kubiak’s plan for the Houston Texans this season. In fact, he wasn’t supposed to play much of a role at all. But the seventh-round pick has been so impressive in camp that Kubiak is beginning to change his mind. “He’s pushing hard to get on the field awful quick, so we’ll see,” Kubiak said. “That’s a big step to take, but if the kid keeps doing what he’s doing, we’re going to have to find a way to get him out there.”
Seismic bump at mine kills two rescue workers, injures seven
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A9
A disastrous cave-in Thursday night killed two rescue workers and injured at least seven others who were trying to tunnel through rubble to reach six trapped miners, authorities said. Mining officials were considering whether to suspend the rescue effort.
Keeping cool
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A11
To the editor: This is the time of year for a bit of perspective on the melodrama that is our dialogue on global warming. It sure is hot. I can’t help but notice the large number of people who scurry from their house to their car to the store to the car to the house - all air-conditioned. Last time I checked, air conditioning uses a lot of power - even when the environmental guidelines on settings are followed.
KU baseball coach linked to Oregon
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B4
Kansas University baseball coach Ritch Price is being linked to the vacant head-coaching job at the University of Oregon, according to a published report. The Oregonian wrote that Price is “a possibility” for the vacancy at Oregon, though athletic director Pat Kilkenny told the paper that he had “not yet” interviewed Price. Price said that he has not been contacted by Kilkenny, but was aware Thursday afternoon of the link.
Moustakas: College would have been OK
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B3
Waking up Thursday as a brand-new millionaire “feels pretty good,” says muscular Mike Moustakas. But he thought that enrolling at Southern Cal with a baseball scholarship and no $4 million signing bonus from the Kansas City Royals would have been a hoot, too.
Good decision
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A11
To the editor: Wal-Mart’s previous plan to build a store at the northwest corner of Sixth and Wakarusa had been denied by the City Commission. The case has been going on for a while and has cost the taxpayers some legal fees. I hope the present city commissioners continue to approve Wal-Mart’s plans to build the store. The traffic couldn’t be much of a problem since Sixth Street - especially at the intersection - has been widened.
Japan swelters in record heat; at least 13 die
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A2
Japan sizzled through its hottest day on record Thursday as a heat wave claimed at least 13 lives and threatened power supplies strained by a recent earthquake, authorities and media reports said.
How hot is it, exactly?
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A1
There’s nothing quite like an August in Kansas. You can’t walk a block without sweat beads trickling down your back, making you wonder if you even took a shower. Opening a car door at mid-day is like stepping into a preheated oven, a suffocating blast of heat hitting you in the face. Then you curse those leather-covered car seats that burn your legs and the roasting steering wheel you can’t touch.
Countrywide taps $11.5B credit line
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A7
Countrywide Financial Corp., the nation’s largest mortgage lender, said Thursday it had borrowed $11.5 billion from a group of 40 banks to fund loans in a move that shows just how deep the lending crisis has become. Countrywide made the move amid a credit crunch that has driven a number of its smaller peers to bankruptcy.
LHS soccer coach bolts; Kelly rises to fill void
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B4
Gone before he started. That will be the legacy of Lawrence High boys soccer coach Christian Sayre, who revealed this week he is leaving to take a job in California. Sayre had been an assistant in the Lions’ girls and boys soccer programs when he was elevated to the head boys’ job in April, replacing David Platt, who had held the post the previous four seasons.
Jenna Bush engaged to former Rove aide
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A2
Jenna Bush is getting married - to a former Karl Rove intern. The 25-year-old first daughter was engaged Wednesday to Henry Hager, 29, a former White House and Commerce Department aide and son of Virginia’s Republican Party chairman.
3 aviators missing after Navy aircraft crashes
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A2
A Navy surveillance aircraft crashed into the Atlantic during a training exercise, and crews searched Thursday for the three aviators who were aboard, authorities said.
Bioscience Authority to give $1M in grants
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A4
Kansas Bioscience Authority announced Thursday it would award up to $1 million in grants to organizations to develop research centers. “We’re going to bring scientists, eminent scholars, engineers and business entrepreneurs together, let them all do what they do best, and then help them keep that success going on their own,” said KBA President Tom Thornton.
Panel calls for tobacco tax increase
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A12
To aid the nation’s fight against cancer, the federal government should increase taxes on tobacco products and strictly regulate the sales and marketing of tobacco, says an advisory panel to the president. Both recommendations, part of a report released Thursday, place the panel at odds with President Bush. The administration’s position is that tax increases to fund spending increases are inadvisable.
City team tickled with tournament finish
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B4
Overcome with joy after checking out the scoreboard posted outside the Lawrence Country Club pro shop, Michele Johnson and Janet Magnuson, two Lawrence friends who doubled as teammates at the Kansas Women’s Golf Association’s Tee-Fore-Two Championship, shared a hug to celebrate finishing with the low gross score in the tournament’s second flight. “I guess I could cry,” Johnson said. “I have no words to describe how happy and proud we are.”
Former K.C. official convicted of fraud
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A5
A former Kansas City councilwoman was found guilty of mortgage fraud Thursday when a federal jury agreed that she intentionally misrepresented information on home loan applications. Saundra McFadden-Weaver was convicted on all counts - one charge of conspiracy and six charges of wire fraud.
Party thrown for woman named oldest person
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A7
A 114-year-old Indiana woman who became the world’s oldest person this week celebrated the distinction Thursday with a slice of her favorite cake. Edna Parker, who has outlived her husband, children and siblings, was confirmed as the world’s oldest known person when Yone Mnagawa, a Japanese woman four months her senior, died Monday. Parker was born April 20, 1893.
Mother’s fight for custody hinges on breast-feeding issue
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A12
Christa Burton knew that child custody battles could take unusual twists, but she never imagined that a court could tell her to stop breast-feeding her 14-month-old son, Carter. That, however, was the recommendation of Carter’s guardian ad litem, or court-appointed advocate, who recently reviewed the multiple medications Burton takes and recommended a halt to the feedings. A judge will consider whether to impose such a restriction next month.
Remains of two people found in bridge wreckage
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A2
The discovery of two more sets of human remains amid the wreckage of the interstate bridge that collapsed raised the known death toll to 11 and left only two more victims to be found.
Pirated-DVD sniffer dogs to get hero’s farewell
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A2
Two American sniffer dogs who found millions of pirated DVDs while on loan to Malaysian authorities will receive medals of honor when their six-month assignment ends next week, an official said Thursday.
Water problems
August 17, 2007
To the editor: In the Aug. 10 edition of Journal-World, I really enjoyed the article explaining the Lawrence tap water smell of recent. This has been a not-so-favorite topic in the neighborhood and at work. The article correctly identified the source of the problem as geosmine; however, the description of the odor and taste as “musky” was not so accurate.
KU professor loved research, students
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A4
World-renowned paleontologist Roger Kaesler, a Kansas University professor for 40 years, exceptionally balanced his ground-breaking research and his role as a friendly mentor in the classroom. “Where he saw an opportunity to mentor young scientists and help them along, he did it,” said Bob Goldstein, chairman of KU’s geology department and Kaesler’s longtime friend. Kaesler, 70, died last weekend after suffering from a long illness.
Fannie Mae profits drop by 36 percent in 2006
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B11
Fannie Mae, the largest U.S. buyer and guarantor of home mortgages, reported Thursday that its profit dropped 36 percent in 2006 and said it expects higher delinquencies and credit losses this year from the turbulence in the mortgage market.
Dell to reduce earnings after auditors misled
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B11
Computer maker Dell Inc. on Thursday said it would reduce more than four years’ worth of earnings by up to $150 million after an internal probe found the company misled its auditors and manipulated results to meet performance goals.
Guillen’s slam sparks Tigers
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B8
Carlos Guillen hit a first-inning grand slam off Mike Mussina, and Ivan Rodriguez also homered to help Detroit beat suddenly struggling New York. Justin Verlander held New York’s lineup in check, and the Tigers won the opener of a key four-game series to move back into first place in the AL Central, a half-game ahead of idle Cleveland.
Man, 91, to be deported for lying about Nazi aid
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A9
An immigration judge has ordered a 91-year-old retired factory worker deported back to his native Lithuania because he lied about his part in the Nazi destruction of Warsaw’s Jewish ghetto in 1943, federal prosecutors said Thursday.
Goodell wants to forget Vick
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B5
Roger Goodell wants to talk football. Michael Vick keeps getting in the way. The NFL commissioner, making a tour of training camps, raved about Detroit Lions coach Rod Marinelli and his players after visiting them Thursday. He spoke to them mostly about their responsibilities as players. As soon as Goodell started taking questions during a news conference, however, he was asked about Vick. And the questions kept coming.
Ex-Marine faces charge in deaths of insurgents
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A8
A former Marine sergeant has been charged with voluntary manslaughter in the killings of two captured Iraqi insurgents in Fallujah in 2004. Head shaven and wearing a black suit with an American flag pin on the lapel, Jose Nazario, 27, answered procedural questions before U.S. Magistrate Judge Oswald Parada. Bail was set at $50,000.
Old Home Town - 25 years ago
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A10
The city was considering the prospect of getting public opinion on a nuclear freeze through a nonbinding question on the November ballot.
Counseling center helps military veterans deal with depression, suicidal thoughts
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A1
A Lawrence counseling center is working with the Kansas National Guard to prevent suicides among military veterans. Headquarters Counseling Center, 211 E. Eighth St., has information about resources available that are specific to veterans and their families when they call for help, director Marcia Epstein said. That information was developed in cooperation with the Guard.
Chargers’ Rivers ready to roll in ‘07
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B5
After becoming coach of the San Diego Chargers, Norv Turner didn’t have to dig through the film vault to review Philip Rivers’ performances. He saw one of them in person. “Unfortunately, I was there the day they really let it go, up in San Francisco where he started throwing it,” said Turner, who as the 49ers’ offensive coordinator saw Rivers throw for 334 yards and two touchdowns last season.
Media told to be positive about driving ban
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A2
Determined to have good news about the Olympics, the Communist Party ordered local journalists to emphasize the positive side of today’s million-car driving ban.
Never-ending
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A10
Valid as it may be, even a notable new book will not quiet the conspiracy theories connected to the JFK assassination. President John F. Kennedy was slain Nov. 22, 1963, in Dallas, and the evidence is overwhelming that one man, malcontent Lee Harvey Oswald, did the killing and acted alone. But speculation, commercializing and theorizing about the tragedy has become a sort of cottage industry in the ensuing 44 years. Never off the table, the matter has been revitalized by the recent release of a book, “Reclaiming History,” by noted criminal prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi.
Green laughs last
Ex-Chief wins in return to K.C.
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B1
Those few Kansas City fans who booed Trent Green in the first quarter Thursday probably were ready to beg him to come back in the fourth. Green looked sharp in his first appearance in Arrowhead Stadium since insisting on a trade to Miami during the offseason. The Chiefs, on the other hand, mostly looked lifeless for the second straight week while trying to find a new quarterback and limp along without holdout running back Larry Johnson.
Giants, Jets find money
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B5
The New York Giants and Jets closed deals Thursday for $1.3 billion in financing for a new stadium the NFL clubs are teaming to build.
Project pumps up plastic production
Upgrades boosting revenues
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B11
PackerWare is well on its way toward making a $118 million expansion and equipment-upgrade program pay off. Steve Brown, plant manager for the division of Berry Plastics Group, 2330 Packer Road, said that sales and production were up more than 30 percent from a year earlier, thanks to renovations and new equipment that enable employees to use a new process to make thinner, more flexible and less resource-hungry products.
Black & Veatch opens office in Lawrence
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B11
Black & Veatch, a global engineering, consulting and construction company, announced Thursday that it had opened a Lawrence office, 1008 N.H., Suite 300. The office will serve as a base of operations for its work on a new sewage treatment plant, to be built along the Wakarusa River south of Lawrence. Black & Veatch started work for the city of Lawrence in 1917, when N.T. Veatch - a co-founder of the firm - designed the city’s original sewage treatment plant, in east Lawrence.
Iraqi leaders forge new political alliance
Four children found alive in rubble
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A8
Iraq’s political leaders emerged Thursday from three days of crisis talks with a new alliance that seeks to save the crumbling U.S.-backed government. But the reshaped power bloc included no Sunnis and immediately raised questions about its legitimacy as a unifying force.
Jose Padilla’s conviction far from original charges
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A9
The guilty verdict returned against Jose Padilla in a Miami courtroom Thursday marked a victory in the Bush administration’s campaign against terrorism, but prosecutors were only able to secure a conviction on charges that were much weaker than the headline-making allegations that Padilla was planning to detonate a radioactive “dirty bomb” in the United States.
Cottonwood honored with vendor award
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B11
Employees of Cottonwood Industries unpack, collate and repackage 100,000 to 200,000 buckets, containers and other plastic products each year for PackerWare. So when Cottonwood employees noticed that a pile of products had been affixed with incorrect UPC stickers - the bar codes that tell a distributor where to send the products for ultimate consumer purchase and use - folks back at the plant took notice.
State Department: Expect to wait longer for passport
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A7
For people seeking U.S. passports, faster service is getting slower. The summer’s maddening backlog in passport applications has forced officials to abandon the old standard of a week’s wait for people willing to pay $60 extra for speedy service. People can expect to wait about three weeks for expedited service, and the government indicated Thursday they should get used to it. A regular application now takes 10 to 12 weeks.
Yanks’ Giambi escapes punishment
Commissioner won’t penalize slugger for ‘steroids history’
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B2
With a bright-eyed smile stretched across his face, Jason Giambi bounced around the field during batting practice and posed for photos with fans. The New York Yankees slugger had plenty to be happy about Thursday. Giambi escaped punishment from commissioner Bud Selig because of his charitable work and cooperation with baseball’s steroids investigator.
Wine Fest to honor St. Lawrence founder
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A4
St. Lawrence Catholic Campus Center is honoring the church’s founder, Monsignor Vincent Krische, at its annual Wine Fest in Kansas City. Krische served as a chaplain and a director at St. Lawrence for 30 years. Two years ago, he became pastor at St. Ann Catholic Church in Prairie Village.
Ranking moves up to No. 38
U.S. News & World Report rates KU better than last year
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A1
Kansas University moved up one spot to 38th in the 2008 rankings of public universities by U.S. News & World Report. This is the second year the university’s ranking has climbed since reaching a low of 45th in the 2006 rankings. The rankings, which hit newsstands Monday in the magazine’s annual “America’s Best Colleges” guide, are facing particularly vocal complaints this year from a group of colleges and educators working to develop an alternative to the system.
NASA decides against shuttle repair
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A6
NASA decided Thursday that no repairs are needed for a deep gouge in Endeavour’s belly and that the space shuttle is safe to fly home. Mission Control notified the seven shuttle astronauts of the decision right before they went to sleep, putting an end to a week of engineering analyses and anxious uncertainty - both in orbit and on Earth.
Police arrest man for trying to rob nun
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A7
A would-be thief came up empty-handed after trying to rob a nun who had taken a vow of poverty. The man broke into the 61-year-old Catholic nun’s home shortly after 8 a.m. Tuesday, police said. When she told him she had no money, he forced her to drive him around in her car for almost an hour in search of money.
Dante Hall will return
August 17, 2007
Dante Hall, who missed the St. Louis Rams’ preseason opener due to a hamstring injury, said Thursday he’s scheduled to play the first half on Saturday night against the San Diego Chargers.
Rescue workers resume search for missing boy
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A3
Rescue workers continued their search Thursday for a 9-year-old boy who disappeared into the muddy waters of the Kansas River north of Wabaunsee. The recovery effort includes two helicopters, five boats and crews looking along the banks, said Shawnee County Sheriff Lt. Martha Lutz. The child was playing on a sandbar with family members and friends when he disappeared Wednesday afternoon.
Man hospitalized after early-morning fight
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A5
A 23-year-old Lawrence man was hit in the face with a rock during a disturbance early Thursday morning in the 1000 block of Pennsylvania, Lawrence Police said.
Stocks climb after rate trimmed
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B4
U.S. stocks surged Friday, with the Dow adding more than 200 points, after the Federal Reserve’s unexpected intervention, yet still ended with weekly losses. “This morning’s move by the Fed is largely symbolic and suggests the Fed is willing to act in the event conditions in the financial markets deteriorate further, but we’re far from being out of the woods,” said Mike Malone, trading analyst at Cowen & Co.
Company line on Medlock: ‘Give him time’
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B1
In the NFL preseason, if a kicker misses two medium-range field goals, he usually can count on a pink slip. Or at least some competition in practice next week. Not Justin Medlock. The Kansas City Chiefs’ rookie kicker missed 37- and 42-yard attempts in the Chiefs’ 11-10 loss to the Miami Dolphins on Thursday, but the third-round draft pick’s job appears to be secure.
District gets former president’s name wrong
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A9
The Ogden School District needs a big eraser. After naming a new school “James A. Madison Elementary School” in May, a history teacher pointed out this month that the fourth president of the United States didn’t have a middle initial. “I’m blindsided,” school board member John Gullo said. “I hate being embarrassed.”
KU classes begin with sizzle
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A3
Keeping cool proved a difficult task for thousands of Kansas University students as they returned to classes Thursday. As temperatures reached triple digits for the fourth consecutive day, little refuge could be found outside or inside the classrooms. Heather Dorssom, a junior from Olathe, said her class in Wescoe “still had the heat on.”
Kemper ‘Prize Patrol’ honors faculty members
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A3
Bryan Young was about to leave his first class of the new semester when his department chairman urged him to stay just a little longer. Just moments later, Chancellor Robert Hemenway and the Kansas University “Prize Patrol” arrived with word that the assistant professor of engineering was one of this year’s William T. Kemper fellows. The fellowship is accompanied by a check for $5,000.
Strong undersea earthquake strikes
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A2
A strong undersea earthquake struck eastern Indonesia today, the U.S. Geological Survey and local officials said. No tsunami warning was issued and there were no immediate reports of damage.
Mayer: Rizzuto one hall of a guy
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B1
Lawrencian Bill James knows more about baseball than any living creature. He thinks the late Phil Rizzuto was a marginal, though popular, entry into the Hall of Fame in 1994. For me, Scooter cinched that honor in 1939 when he autographed my Kansas City Blues program, asked my name and remembered it the next time I was waiting outside the locker room to glimpse my heroes.
Monkey in zoo snatches cell phone cameras
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A9
A Japanese macaque monkey in a Volga Region zoo insists on protecting its “family” from nuisance visitors by snatching away their cell phone cameras, a deputy zoo owner said Thursday.
Horoscopes
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B10
New beginnings become possible through communication. Many of you might opt for new computers, cars and different forms of self-expression. If you are single, your jovial, upbeat style draws admirers. You could meet someone this year while running to the cleaners. If you are attached, spending more time alone, just the two of you, adds to the warmth of your bond. LIBRA loves to engage in conversation with you.
KU kicker Webb ready for finale
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B1
One of the most boring plays in college football the past few years - the kickoff - figures to be a fan favorite in 2007. Why? Tees this season will be placed on the 30-yard-line, not the 35. Those five yards figure to be enough to put the touchback on the endangered list. “You look at the NFL : there are very few touchbacks in the NFL. We’re now kicking it from the same spot they are,” KU special-teams coach Louie Matsakis said.
Peruvian prime minister pleads for aid after earthquake
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A9
Peru’s prime minister pleaded for emergency aid - “even coffins” - as the toll from the strongest earthquake to hit this country in 35 years climbed Thursday to 510 dead, at least 1,550 injured and tens of thousands homeless. With both the hospitals and a crowded 18th century church in this city of 130,000 destroyed, two dozen people were being treated on a concrete soccer field across the street from one of the hospitals.
Old Home Town - 100 years ago
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A10
From the Lawrence Daily World for Aug. 17, 1907: “A local man killed a bull snake in his yard yesterday and it measured 57 inches. : Wherry T. Morton was found guilty of using offensive language to his wife and was fined a total of $6.50 by police judge Menter. He protested and plans to file an appeal.
Northwest could land ownership of Midwest
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B4
Northwest Airlines Corp. could end up owning rival Midwest Air Group Inc., which has agreed to a $450 million buyout offer from private equity firm TPG Capital.
Hospitals examining end-of-life care
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A3
Two area hospitals were featured in the most recent issue of Supportive Voice, the publication for the supportive care industry. The Palliative Care teams at Saint John hospital in Leavenworth and Kansas University Hospital in Kansas City, Kan., were joined by three other hospitals in an article about the research the teams are doing. In their research, the hospitals examined what sort of procedures can improve the quality of end-of-life care.
Ryan Wood’s KU Football Notebook
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B4
Arkansas transfer Andrew Norman will not be playing football at Kansas University this year. A source at KU confirmed that Norman wasn’t coming, which correlated with what Norman’s father, Robert, said earlier Thursday. “It looks like he won’t be enrolling at Kansas,” Robert Norman said. “I’m not sure where he’ll be enrolling, but it appears he won’t be going to Kansas.”
Man accused of taping men in bathroom
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A3
A man arrested for allegedly videotaping other men in the bathrooms at the Missouri State Fair has been charged with invasion of privacy. Larry J. Hinson, 41, of Kansas City, Kan., was released earlier this week on a $5,000 cash bond on a felony charge of second-degree invasion of privacy. Hinson is accused of filming people without their knowledge when they were partially nude, the charge states.
Patrol seeks fuel deals
August 17, 2007 in print edition on A3
The Journal-World found gas prices as low as $2.74 at several locations. If you find a lower price, call Pump Patrol at 832-7154.
New school year starts in Greensburg
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B12
There’s no Internet, no cafeteria, not even a locker-lined hallway in sight. But school is back in session in Greensburg, just as Superintendent Darin Headrick vowed it would be. Days after a deadly tornado killed 10 people and wiped out the south-central Kansas town on May 4, Headrick promised that Unified School District 422’s students would attend classes this fall in Greensburg, no matter what.
West hoping to bounce back
August 17, 2007 in print edition on B7
Each team in any sport can say it had a season to forget, whether it didn’t live up to expectations or everything seemed to go wrong. And teams like the West Junior High Warhawks and new head coach, Mike Gillman are all about recovery the following season. Warhawk football suffered through a 1-8 record last season, but with a new coach and a promising freshman class, the Warhawks are ready to forget about last year’s struggles.