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Archive for Tuesday, October 31, 2006

High stakes

October 31, 2006

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To the editor:

In the 48 years that I have been a voter, the stakes in an election have never been greater.

For the past eight years, and for longer in terms of foreign policy, the U.S. government and our corporate culture have been moving further and further toward enriching themselves rather than serving the common good, undermining our public institutions, and causing havoc around the world.

What happens on Nov. 7 and two years hence will determine whether American civilization recovers its place as a beacon for peoples striving to throw off the twin curses of poverty and oppression, or collapses into the dustbin of history alongside other obsolete empires.

Recent news from the American hustings and the battlefields where our warriors are dying pointlessly suggests a profound shift in public opinion may be turning our course back to decency and rationality.

My optimism has been burned many times. Perhaps this is the year when enlightened and well-meaning Americans will have some cause for rejoicing.

Gerald Mikkelson,

Lawrence

Comments

Speakout 8 years, 1 month ago

I think this author is right on the money. I am concerned for the America we have become and sorry for the one that has been lost by commercialism and greed. We must return to rational thinking and follow the precepts of what is right for ALL Americans. I am reminded of this song written some years ago.

GREENWOOD Peter Yarrow- ©1973 Pepamar Music ASCAP

I've seen a thousand people kneel in silence And I've seen them face the rifles with their songs I always thought that we could end the killing But now I live in fear that I was wrong

The killer and the cynic waltz together Their eyes are turned into their skulls They do not feel the bullets in the bodies They do not hear the dolphins or the gulls

If we do these things in the greenwood, what will happen in the dry?

If we don't stop there'll come a time when women With barren wombs will bitterly rejoice With breasts that dry and never fill with promise Gladly they'll not suckle one more life

Is this then the whimper and the ending? The impotence of people raised on fear, A fear that blinds the sense of common oneness Common love and life or death are here

If we do these things in the greenwood, what will happen in the dry?

Will no one light the candle in the darkness Will no one be my guide, not let me fall I've lost the sense that tells me where the path is I feel the chill of winter in my soul

There's no way I can say the words more plainly There's no one left to point at anymore It's you and me and we must make the choice now And not destroy the life we're living for

If we do these things in the greenwood, what will happen in the dry?

classclown 8 years, 1 month ago

"What happens on Nov. 7 and two years hence will determine whether American civilization recovers its place as a beacon for peoples striving to throw off the twin curses of poverty and oppression..."

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How many people sneak in here every year? How many are here illegally? Seems like a beacon to me. No recovery necessary.

Richard Heckler 8 years, 1 month ago

Retired Lieut. Gen. William Odom calls the Iraq War "the worst strategic mistake in the history of the United States" and draws a grim parallel with the Vietnam War. He says that US strategy in Iraq, as in Vietnam, has served almost exclusively the interests of our enemies. He says that our objectives in Vietnam passed through three phases leading to defeat. These were: (1) 1961-65, "containing" China; (2) 1965-68, obsession with US tactics, leading to "Americanization" of the war; and (3) 1968-75, phony diplomacy and self-deluding "Vietnamization." Iraq has now completed two similar phases and is entering the third, says Odom, now a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute. In March he wrote in the newsletter of Harvard's Nieman Foundation:

http://www.thenation.com/doc/20061016/whalen

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