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Archive for Wednesday, October 12, 2005

Celebrate U.N.

October 12, 2005

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To the editor:

Congratulations to Doris Dort for her excellent letter to the editor of Sept. 26 supporting the United Nations and urging readers to celebrate United Nations Day on Oct. 24.

The many U.N. specialized agencies are useful in helping newly independent, poor, underdeveloped nations get started. New nations dislike accepting aid with strings attached from the great powers. Aside from moral considerations, the United States has a stake in the success of new nations. The world cannot survive half rich and half abysmally poor.

The U.N., as the "town meeting of the world," is the best forum for successful diplomacy to solve national conflicts of interest before they escalate into physical conflicts of war. International tensions may be eased by the safety valve of talking. As Winston Churchill put it, "Jaw, jaw is better than war, war!"

The U.N. helps to create world community, world brotherhood and world consensus instead of narrow nationalism. The U.N. flag, the U.N. headquarters in New York, the U.N. charter and the Office of the Secretary General are all symbols of an embryonic world community which some day must evolve into a world federal government providing justice, peace and the essential world conditions for the pursuit of human happiness.

The United States is a charter member of the United Nations. So, let's fly our blue and white United Nations flag during United Nations Week, Oct. 24 to 31! During this week, may social studies classes learn about the United Nations.

John A. Bond,

Lawrence

Comments

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 9 years, 2 months ago

"One wonders: if the U.S. is to be part of this world federal government and one assumes that it is not achieved by the other 190 members somehow taking on American ideals of government (although the Bush neo-cons would certainly like them to)"

Unless government of, by, and for multinational corporations is how you define "American ideals of government," then I don't think this is a fair statement of what the neocons intend.

Jamesaust 9 years, 2 months ago

"...which some day must evolve into a world federal government providing justice, peace and the essential world conditions for the pursuit of human happiness."

One wonders: if the U.S. is to be part of this world federal government and one assumes that it is not achieved by the other 190 members somehow taking on American ideals of government (although the Bush neo-cons would certainly like them to), then one is left to ask -- what aspects of American constitutional government does the author believe Americans should sacrifice? Limited government? Separation of powers? Consent of the governed? An independent judiciary? The rule of law? Property rights? Freedom of religion? Freedom of speech?

Should the author desire to see "world brotherhood" and an avoidance of "narrow nationalism" in his lifetime (or more likely the lifetime of his grandchildren's grandchildren), then that will come about by an increased emphasis on core local identities and choices (some of which no doubt will not want anything to do with a "world government"). (This phenomena is apparent already in the European Union where greater inter-state integration has led to greater intra-state division; Now safe within the Euro cocoon and guaranteed non-discriminatory economic rights, peoples in Catalonia, or Provence, or Breton, or Flanders, or Scotland are going their own way.)

This will not and cannot happen with the United Nations, which has nothing to do with people and everything to do with the nations (and hence the nationalism) that comprise it. Americans are not members of the U.N., nor are the Chinese or Britains- the U.S.A., the P.R.C. & the U.K. are. Query: will the U.N. help the Uighars form a "new nation" or will the U.N. member, the P.R.C., say "no?" Will the U.N. faciliatate separate states out of Nigeria for the Yorubas, the Ibos, the Efiks, the Ijaws, etc., or just divide it between Christians and Muslims, all with the cooperation of the Nigerian state?

Far more useful on this 60th anniversary would be an honest appraisal of the shortcomings and limitations of the United Nations as an instutition and ideas on how to make it effective as a proponent of the rights and interests of human beings rather than kings and dictators.

ECM 9 years, 2 months ago

Top 10 U.N. Slogans 10. If an impotent, bloated bureaucracy can't solve it then it's best left festering 9. You can't spell "unethical" without U.N. 8. Genocidal dictators, beware our non-binding resolutions 7. Bringing peace to our world (actual results may vary) 6. Tomorrow's corruption today 5. Raising pointless squabbling to an art form 4. We take bribes so you don't have to 3. Try our world famous cheesy fries 2. If troubles abound, we'll be nearby doing nothing

And the #1 U.N. slogan...

  1. If this is an emergency, please hang up and dial American!

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