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Archive for Monday, August 8, 2005

Military access to student lists raises concern

August 8, 2005

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The forms are going home to students and their parents in high school newsletters.

As students prepare to return to school, they can opt out of having their names, addresses and phone numbers included in directory information given by the schools to the military to aid recruiting.

A little-known provision of the 2001 No Child Left Behind Act allows the military to request student rosters.

Recruiters said the information makes their jobs easier.

"I think it's very valuable for the recruiting system," said Eddie Olsen, recruiter in charge at the Navy Recruiting Station at 23rd and Louisiana streets.

But it's an issue that concerns some privacy advocates and others.

"This obviously caused a great deal of worry among people interested in civil liberties," said Howard Schaffer, spokesman for Public Education Network, a nonprofit public school advocacy group.


Recruiter Eddie Olsen talks with Matt Simmons, Topeka, at the Navy recruiting office, 2233 La. Simmons, who was referred by a friend who recently enlisted in the Navy,  visited with Olsen on Friday evening to get more information about service.

Recruiter Eddie Olsen talks with Matt Simmons, Topeka, at the Navy recruiting office, 2233 La. Simmons, who was referred by a friend who recently enlisted in the Navy, visited with Olsen on Friday evening to get more information about service.

Years after the law's passage, a small percentage of Lawrence students refuse to have their information shared.

At Lawrence High, 42 of 1,244 students have opted not to have their information released. At Free State High in the past school year, 18 students of about 1,200 opted out.

Before the 2001 law, schools were not required to give out the information, but some did.

Deb Koons, registrar at Lawrence High, said the school gave out the information even before the law was passed.

"Nothing's changed as far as what we give out," she said.

But some schools did withhold the information, and, in those cases, the military had to rely on data gathered when young people registered for the draft, Schaffer said.

Students who opt out of having their information given to the military also opt out on other areas they might find less objectionable. For example, opting out often means a student's information also will be removed from the student directory sold at fundraisers or from lists given to colleges or the media.

Schaffer said this provision has exposed the limits to information management in many schools.

Olsen said he has seen some recruiters abuse the privilege and hound students, but that doesn't occur in the Navy or his office.

He said if a person asks not to be called again, the Navy won't call back.

"We really don't pressure anybody to do anything they don't want to do," he said.

Comments

trueninetiesgirl 9 years, 4 months ago

they recruited my son off that list well a matter of fact they had two of my boy. on i havent seen anything that the army promised my son. and for the second son he had to pull out for he became a single dad. all the recruiter did was tell my son that he would never be any more then a fry cook. if he didnt stay in the army. they called him names and down graded him, and all he wanted to do was be a father .i have no faith in what the recruiters have to say but get every thing they say to you in writting.

craigers 9 years, 4 months ago

Ruskastud, knowing the English language and grammar are not the only measures of being a valuable contributor to the world. Obviously you seem to be a great person and so valuable with all of your intelligence, ruskanotastud. However, you never seemed to get that part about respecting people. I have to agree with trueninetiesgirl because I have known several people that have had the same experience with the military and how when you want to pull out, they belittle you and try to make you stay. Yeah, that seems like the type of organization that I would want to dedicate my life to. However, I do think that they should have access to the information since they do need to recruit just like colleges need to recruit students.

trueninetiesgirl 9 years, 4 months ago

just because i dont spell well. dont mean i cant have a say so. my children are very smart hows. a 4.2 gpa sound to you and my son has a great job and no he isnt a fry cook. and he is a great dad.when the mother ran off he took charge for his daughter . and for my other son he is a E5 still in arm .i do think that they should only talk to the kids that are 18 yrs old in high school.beside why give are children guns? they cant even drink till they are 21. but can go die at 18 for what???? we just keep letting the goverment take are children and putting them in some one elses fight .

Richard Heckler 9 years, 4 months ago

Should not treat public school rosters like they are general public information. Parents should always always be contacted anytime someone is requesting data in their children...that is the bottom line.

lunacydetector 9 years, 4 months ago

nope wilbur, i think arminius has it right in his analogy and you have it way wrong.

merrill wrote: "Parents should always always be contacted anytime someone is requesting data in their children...that is the bottom line."......

CASE CLOSED.

hurlehey 9 years, 4 months ago

I told recruiters I Lost a foot in a horrible pie eating contest and they never called me again. True story.

Wilbur_Nether 9 years, 4 months ago

Actually, Arminius, the issues are quite different. Military recruiters asking for a school roster to recruit students is very different from a student initiating a request for services from a licensed, board-certified physician.

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