Advertisement

LJWorld.com weblogs Vantage Point

McCain-Obama wars : a new hope

Advertisement

Watching the debate last week was a unique experience. I have never watched one and did not know what to expect. I was surprised by the civility of the candidates. The word "debate" conjured thoughts of feisty exchanges. I've watched debates at the high school level, and while they might not have been feisty, the objective was clear: Win the audience and the judges. This debate, however, failed to accomplish that.The economic crisis might have thrown a wrench for McCain by taking away precious time from world affairs, but that is what is to be expected of a president: to be always ready to face the constant change in the political and economical climate. Going into the debate, I was apprehensive about Obama's ability to speak without the help of his speech writers, especially on the topics where McCain seemed to have the upper hand. Like many, I was ready for McCain to take charge and validate his perception as the qualified candidate to be commander in chief. Like many, I was a little disappointed. While he seemed knowledgeable about foreign affairs, he didn't clearly separate himself from Obama.I admit that I don't know all of the foreign issues and their implications for the United States. I was more interested in understanding how any of those foreign issues would have an impact locally. Hearing McCain didn't help me understand those issues. A lot of it was what I had already heard from news reports and other campaign speeches. While Obama was supposed to be the underdog in this debate, he didn't act like one. I was surprised by the ease with which he handled the questions. Maybe starting off with the economic situation helped him get into a groove. While I don't know the accuracy or validity of his talking points on foreign affairs, he did come across as knowledgeable and insightful. He must have done some crash course on World Affairs 101. One of the things that bugged me the most was the number of times he said he agreed with McCain. I don't know if that is proper etiquette in a debate where you are trying to win over the other person's ideas and talking points. After watching the debate, I'm convinced that this election is going to be decided on perceptions and sound bites. Many of the recaps that I read the next day mirrored my thoughts. I don't know if there are many voters who will take the time to validate and research all the ideas, plans, history, accusations, voting records and backgrounds of each candidate. As much as I should, I just don't have the time to invest in such a task. As to who won this debate, I liken it to watching movies. McCain was a blockbuster waiting to happen, but when released, it was just a good movie. Obama was not expected to do well, but he preformed well and got decent reviews. Who won is based on each viewer's perceptions. Maybe the best thing to do is not have any perceptions, but whom are we kidding? When it comes to elections, perception is the new reality.

Comments

Lynn731 5 years, 6 months ago

I don't think he gets it at all. Good job McCain! Thank you, Lynn

0

Darth_Vader 5 years, 6 months ago

After thinking about this "Paul Theravarajoo is a Douglas County resident who has agreed to blog about his experience as a first-time voter on LJWorld.com." and then this statement "I don't know if there are many voters who will take the time to validate and research all the ideas, plans, history, accusations, voting records and backgrounds of each candidate. As much as I should, I just don't have the time to invest in such a task." Then the LJWorld should find someone who will invest the time. Otherwise it's a pretty sorry excuse for a "blog".

0

Darth_Vader 5 years, 6 months ago

Paul, You seem very uninformed about the candidates, maybe you should go to their respective websites and read about them before you make your decision. If you don't please do us all a favor and don't vote.

0

beatrice 5 years, 6 months ago

Paul, why would you have a problem with Obama agreeing that McCain is correct on certain matters? Since we are talking about what is best for the nation, it isn't just a matter of automatically taking the opposing view on any given issue. McCain is correct on certain issues, as is Obama. Sometimes they are the same issues, as Obama is willing to admit. I see this as a positive thing -- although others, like yourself, don't and I'm sure he won't do it as frequently during the next debate. But you should ask yourself, do I want a president who is willing to agree with someone not of his own party if it is for the best of the nation, or a president who won't even look at or acknowledge his "opponent" of the opposite party? Do you want the person who will say "yes, he is correct on this issue," or the other guy who just keeps saying "he doesn't get it, he doesn't get it" no matter the subject. Just looking at the debate and the individual styles presented, who do you think would truly be best at breaking the partisan gridlock that has come to define Washington in recent years?

0

joshupetersen 5 years, 6 months ago

A lot of the differences between McCain and Obama aren't in what they realize is happening (almost everyone can see 'hey, there's a problem') the difference is what they plan to do about it.McCain's answer has been to continue the pattern of the Bush disaster. (And for ANYONE who doubts the Bush economics were a disaster, I will remind you we had our strongest economy in history before he took office and changed economic policies.)As for Obama's position on the economics... in my opinion, they're not enough. They leaps and bounds better than the financial suicide that McCain wants to continue, and they might keep us afloat, but they're not enough to make us strong again.(I personally suggest we switch over to the Heritage Check system as proposed in Robert Heinlein's book 'For Us, the Living, which mathmatically works out to be one of the most stable systems ever.)

0

ilovelucy 5 years, 6 months ago

Paul: I find it interesting that you stated that the election will be decided by perceptions and sound bytes. Some of your statements lead me to believe that you will make your decision from just that. It's too bad that you won't find the time to research the facts.

0

paulhatestheelderly 5 years, 6 months ago

So Keith,You are comfortable with uninformed citizens deciding the future of this country? Wow, to say that speaks volumes about you is a gross understatement.

0

Keith 5 years, 6 months ago

The same right as any American citizen, however uninformed or misinformed.

0

paulhatestheelderly 5 years, 6 months ago

Paul wites that "I don't know if there are many voters who will take the time to validate and research all the ideas, plans, history, accusations, voting records and backgrounds of each candidate. As much as I should, I just don't have the time to invest in such a task." I ask that if he does not have them time to invest in such a task, then what right does he have to vote?

0

Commenting has been disabled for this item.