Posts tagged with Ku Football

Most crucial Jayhawks 2015: No. 16 - LB Courtney Arnick

Back-to-back linebackers in the middle of the list, as today's entry follows up South Carolina transfer Marcquis Roberts.

Both guys figure to have important roles on this year's defense, where they will be asked not only to replace fifth-round NFL draft pick Ben Heeney, but also would-be senior Jake Love, who stepped away from football with one year of eligibility remaining due to medical issues.

Heeney and Love provided the Jayhawks with that classic linebacker mentality and a ton of toughness and play-making ability.

Is there another Jayhawk waiting in the wings who can do the same?

Here's a look at No. 16:

Kansas defenders Courtney Arnick (28) and Michael Reynolds (55) try to bring down Texas Tech running back DeAndre Washington during the third quarter on Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014 at Jones AT&T Stadium in Lubbock, Texas.

Kansas defenders Courtney Arnick (28) and Michael Reynolds (55) try to bring down Texas Tech running back DeAndre Washington during the third quarter on Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014 at Jones AT&T Stadium in Lubbock, Texas. by Nick Krug

16. Courtney Arnick, 6-foot-2, 207-pound Jr. Linebacker

The Dallas native has spent most of his KU career under the radar but that's about to change.

Arguably the most talented and productive returning player at a very thin position, Arnick's importance to this year's team cannot be overlooked. He might not be the kind of guy who can step in by himself and replace the production of departed middle linebacker Ben Heeney, but don't tell him that. Arnick is an incredibly confident guy who has gotten better each year and just now seems to be figuring out how to use his strengths to his advantage.

Perhaps his biggest strength is his speed. Toward the end of the 2014 season Arnick consistently flew to the football and used his wheels to make plays or help clean up tackles started by other guys.

At just a touch over 200 pounds, he's never going to be a guy who knocks running backs on their butts or lowers a boom heard 'round the world. But that doesn't stop him from being productive and it also does not mean he's afraid to hit.

Last season, Arnick finished sixth on the team with 45 tackles — 34 solo — and added four tackles for loss and a sack. He got better as the season moved on — as his 10-tackle performance in the second-to-last game of the season at OU showed — and started five games while playing in all 12.

At this point, Arnick seems a little like one of those guys from whom the Jayhawks know what they're going to get. But that does not make his role any less vital. The KU roster has a handful of bodies to choose from when the coaches go to fill out their linebacker rotation this season. But the unit is going to need a lead dog and it could be Arnick's turn to slide into that spot, both statistically speaking and as a leader.

In talking to him, it seems as if he's up for the challenge. Now he just has to show it.

Most Crucial Jayhawks 2015:

No. 25 - WR Derrick Neal

No. 24 - S Fish Smithson

No. 23 - S Greg Allen

No. 22 - OL Junior Visinia

No. 21 - CB Tyrone Miller Jr.

No. 20 - OL De'Andre Banks

No. 19 - S Tevin Shaw

No. 18 - WR Chase Harrell

No. 17 - LB Marcquis Roberts

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Most crucial Jayhawks 2015: No. 18 - WR Chase Harrell

With so many offensive play makers leaving the team for one reason or another this offseason, one of the biggest questions surrounding this year's KU football team centers around how it will rack up yards and put up points.

That's why you'll see a bunch of offensive players on the rest of this list, starting with today's entry, a tall, lean, athletic wide receiver from Texas who has an incredibly bright future.

Whether that light shines immediately or takes some time to surface is not yet known, but No. 18 on the list may be one of the most exciting Jayhawks to track in the coming weeks and years.

Class of 2015 WR Chase Harrell, who graduated high school early and will participate in spring practices at KU.

Class of 2015 WR Chase Harrell, who graduated high school early and will participate in spring practices at KU. by Matt Tait

18. Chase Harrell, 6-foot-4, 200-pound Fr. Wide Receiver

The story goes like this: Just about every player who caught a pass on last year's team left during the offseason, leaving the door wide open for any number of new pass catchers to storm through it.

The question, however, is which guys will be ready and which guys won't?

It's hard to say that a true freshman fresh out of high school would be a guy that could be tossed into the ready category, but Harrell's early graduation and arrival in time for spring practices gave him the jump he needed on the competition.

KU coach David Beaty said the spring was enormous for Harrell, who matured a great deal in the seven months since graduating from high school, as a receiver, a student and a man.

Blessed with a fantastic frame and some terrific raw skills, Harrell will be given every opportunity to prove he's ready to make an immediate impact. Because this offense figures to utilize upwards of eight or nine receivers each game, it seems highly likely that Harrell will have some kind of role this season, if for no other reason than his size and skills. How significant that role will be and what kind of noise he makes on Saturdays remains to be seen, but Beaty already has heaped some heavy praise on the young man from Huffman, Texas, comparing him to former Texas A&M receiver and eventual first-round pick in the NFL Draft, Mike Evans.

Beaty said Harrell was ahead of where Evans was as a true freshman — largely because Evans came to A&M as a basketball player transitioning to football — and continues to say the sky is the limit for arguably the most intriguing receiver on the entire roster.

Most Crucial Jayhawks 2015:

No. 25 - WR Derrick Neal

No. 24 - S Fish Smithson

No. 23 - S Greg Allen

No. 22 - OL Junior Visinia

No. 21 - CB Tyrone Miller Jr.

No. 20 - OL De'Andre Banks

No. 19 - S Tevin Shaw

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Former KU CB Chris Harris’ rise to stardom a true underdog story

As a four-year starter for the Jayhawks, senior cornerback Chris Harris has seen the highs and lows of the football program. His freshman year culminated in an Orange Bowl victory. In his senior year, the team is 2-6 going into today’s home game against Colorado.

As a four-year starter for the Jayhawks, senior cornerback Chris Harris has seen the highs and lows of the football program. His freshman year culminated in an Orange Bowl victory. In his senior year, the team is 2-6 going into today’s home game against Colorado. by Nick Krug

With the current state of Kansas football leaving more than a little to be desired by the KU fan base, it's often easier to think back about the good days than it is to focus on the present or even forecast the future.

Whether that brings memories of Todd Reesing to Kerry Meier in the snow, the Orange Bowl title in 2008 or a stretch of three bowl appearances in four seasons, the fond memories are there and they did not take place too long ago.

One such memory, or at least a memorable Jayhawk, that just now seems to be gaining serious steam is the four-year career of cornerback Chris Harris. Harris, currently a starter for the Denver Broncos who is widely regarded as one of the top cornerbacks in the NFL, has gone a long way toward bringing positive vibes to the KU program to fans of professional football.

Denver Broncos strong safety Chris Harris (25) celebrates with free safety Quinton Carter after Carter intercepted a pass by Pittsburgh quarterback Ben Roethlisberger in the second quarter of their NFL wild-card playoff game Sunday in Denver. The Broncos won in overtime, leaving Harris — a Kansas University product — on one of just eight teams still alive.

Denver Broncos strong safety Chris Harris (25) celebrates with free safety Quinton Carter after Carter intercepted a pass by Pittsburgh quarterback Ben Roethlisberger in the second quarter of their NFL wild-card playoff game Sunday in Denver. The Broncos won in overtime, leaving Harris — a Kansas University product — on one of just eight teams still alive.

If you're a regular visitor of this site, you've probably seen and read plenty about Harris. But there's even more to his story than the current success and memorable milestones he's racking up by the day.

The Broncos official web site recently did a fantastic job with Harris' story, in a three-part series known as The Underdog.

Here you get a very candid and entertaining look at Harris' beginning and everything that went into making him the player — and person — he is today.

It's worth a watch for anyone, but will be especially meaningful for KU fans who remember No. 16 making his mark during that magical Orange Bowl season in 2007.

Check it out…

The Underdog Part I:
http://www.denverbroncos.com/multimedia/videos/The-Underdog-Part-1/54a56073-b685-4771-9588-16e0e3338340

The Underdog Part II:
http://www.denverbroncos.com/multimedia/videos/The-Underdog-Part-2/b40b095a-611c-4f0e-a7a7-97ec6e955ea7

The Underdog Part III:
http://www.denverbroncos.com/multimedia/videos/The-Underdog-Part-3/470ba9e5-edcc-43c8-88ca-c06a39d4c184

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Most crucial Jayhawks 2015: No. 21 - CB Tyrone Miller Jr.

21.Tyrone Miller Jr., 6-foot, 180-pound Fr. Cornerback

Don't be surprised if Miller plays a big role on this KU defense pretty quickly.

The Jayhawks are in big time need of some cornerbacks who can play and Miller, who comes to KU from Saline High in Ann Arbor, Michigan, poised beyond his years and ready to play a physical and aggressive style of football, might wind up being one of the better gets in the 2015 recruiting class.

Originally committed to Central Michigan, Miller got on board with the idea of challenging himself in the Big 12 when fellow Michigan native and KU running backs coach Reggie Mitchell got involved in his recruitment.

Mitchell has a fantastic track record of landing top talent and Miller said Mitchell's persistence along with the vision for the future laid out by head coach David Beaty was enough to convince him that Kansas was the place to be.

A self-described “physical, in-your-face cornerback,” Miller drew early interest from in-state power programs Michigan and Michigan State, but lost touch with the Wolverines when the school turned over its coaching staff and was forced to look elsewhere when MSU filled up its class.

That development turned out to be KU's gain and even though there are a half dozen other cornerbacks on the roster who could challenge Miller for playing time and even a starting spot, his experience in man-to-man coverages and all-around athleticism and versatility make him a strong candidate to hold down one of the starting cornerback spots, with juco transfer Brandon Stewart most likely being the other starter entering the 2015 season.

Most Crucial Jayhawks 2015:

No. 25 - WR Derrick Neal

No. 24 - S Fish Smithson

No. 23 - S Greg Allen

No. 22 - OL Junior Visinia

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Most crucial Jayhawks 2015: No. 22 - OL Junior Visinia

Everyone knows that having a strong offensive line — especially in a pass-happy conference like the Big 12 — is paramount to a team's success. And there are a handful of guys on the Kansas University football roster who give the Jayhawks a chance to trot a line with a little bit of experience and some talent onto the field this fall.

The latest entry in our ongoing series of the most crucial Jayhawks for the KU football team this fall is one of those guys.

Here's a look:

Richard Gwin/Journal World-Photo.KU freshman Junior Visinia, works against freshman Lay'Trion Jones during practice on Wednesday November 19, 2013.

Richard Gwin/Journal World-Photo.KU freshman Junior Visinia, works against freshman Lay'Trion Jones during practice on Wednesday November 19, 2013. by Richard Gwin

22. Junior Visinia, 6-foot-4, 345-pound Soph. Offensive Lineman

Visinia is coming off of a solid freshman season in which he played in all 12 games and started three at right guard.

The biggest question for the Grandview, Missouri, native heading into his second season with the Jayhawks will not be focused on what he did during the offseason to make himself stronger.

Ability is not the issue here. Visinia has a solid understanding of how to play the position, is versatile enough to handle run blocking and pass blocking and has possibly the best feet of the bunch, especially when you consider his size. But there were times last season — as there are with all freshmen — when Visinia was simply overmatched from a strength perspective. And if he did not do enough in the offseason to address that then the likelihood of him making a significant jump during Year 2 drops.

Having said that, it sounds like new strength and conditioning coach Je'Ney Jackson and crew have worked these guys hard over the summer and are seeing great results both in terms of improved power and stamina.

The experience Visinia picked up last season as a true freshman just trying to figure it all out should go a long way toward making him comfortable from the get-go this season. And his presence as an anchor at right guard should be something KU can count on.

Most Crucial Jayhawks 2015:

No. 25 - WR Derrick Neal

No. 24 - S Fish Smithson

No. 23 - S Greg Allen

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Most Crucial Jayhawks 2015: No. 24 - S Fish Smithson

Yesterday, we unveiled No. 25 in our countdown of the most crucial KU football players for this fall. Today, it's on to No. 24, where we flip from offense to defense.

Here's a look.

Kansas safety Fish Smithson catches a pass during warmups prior to the Jayhawks' kickoff against Duke on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2014, at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina.

Kansas safety Fish Smithson catches a pass during warmups prior to the Jayhawks' kickoff against Duke on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2014, at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina. by Nick Krug

24. Fish Smithson, 5-foot-11, 193-pound Jr. Safety

After spending one season at Hartnell College, the friendly dude with the funky name arrived on campus prior to the 2014 season poised and ready to play Division I football.

A big reason for that was Fish's upbringing, when he left his native Baltimore to live with his brother, Shaky, in Utah while Shaky starred for the Utes football program. Being tossed into an environment like that forced Fish to mature more quickly than most guys his age and the up-close-and-personal look at college football at a young age allowed him to pick up little things that later would help him make the transition.

In a back-up role to Cassius Sendish and Isaiah Johnson, Fish played in all 12 games last season and finished as KU's fifth-leading tackler.

With those guys out of the picture and the completely remade secondary desperate for leadership and a veteran presence, Fish should have a chance to emerge not only as more of a play-maker but also as one of the generals on defense for the Jayhawks.

Not blessed with any one spectacular skill, Fish is incredibly solid in several areas. He's a lot like Sendish in that way and he is not afraid to stick his nose in there to make a tackle.

The Jayhawks have a bunch of defensive backs on the roster and many of them possess terrific speed, athletic ability and upside. But few of them have the kind of game experience — and production — that Fish brings to the table and that puts the junior in position to be one of the more important pieces on the team, both in terms of delivering on the field and helping bring the young guys along.

Here's a look at the list so far…

Most Crucial Jayhawks 2015:

No. 25 - WR Derrick Neal

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Semi-regular check of the KU football roster reveals a few changes

Kansas buck Ben Goodman (93) leads the Jayhawks onto the field against South Dakota on Saturday, Sept. 7, 2013 at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas buck Ben Goodman (93) leads the Jayhawks onto the field against South Dakota on Saturday, Sept. 7, 2013 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

Don't look now, but July has arrived and, like it or not, before we know it, it's going to feel an awful lot like football season around here.

For now, the KU men's basketball team's run at the World University Games in South Korea is keeping much of the focus away from KU football, as is the fan base's absence of much hope for the upcoming season. Both are valid reasons to keep football on the back burner, but seeing how football is the reason they pay me, I'm not quite as able to turn my attention away from it. Nor do I want to.

This season likely will be rough. But I continue to be impressed by this coaching staff, the direction the program is ultimately headed and, most of all, the incredible effort being put forth by the players this summer. This KU team might lack depth and it might even lack Big 12 talent, but you'd never know it from the way these guys are working.

I know it sounds like you've heard that before, and you probably have. But if it's true, you can't just ignore it. Does that mean the work they're putting in now will lead to wins this fall? That's probably not very likely. But it does mean that they already have bought in to this new staff and are not wasting any time putting in the first bricks in what they hope someday will be a strong house.

Enough about all of that, though. Let's jump into some interesting tidbits that won't make or break the season but might be interesting enough to get you to that next KU hoops game....

• During my weekly viewing of the official KU football roster (always have to make sure I'm aware of any updates that might have taken place) I noticed that senior defensive lineman Ben Goodman is no longer going to wear No. 93, which he has worn since he arrived on campus four years ago. Goodman, instead, will be wearing No. 10 this fall. We haven't had the chance to talk to these guys in quite a while but I'll definitely be interested to hear why Goodman decided to make the change.

• Speaking of numbers, everyone loves quarterbacks and it's probably not too early to start scouting which KU QBs will wear what numbers this fall. Montell Cozart, who seems like a virtual lock to start the season opener on Sept. 5, will still be wearing No. 2. Newcomers Carter Stanley (No. 9) and Ryan Willis (No. 13) are also worth noting. The most recent QB to wear No. 9 at Kansas was 2013 starter Jake Heaps, who, by the way, caught on with the New York Jets and is one of five quarterbacks to sign with the Jets heading into camp. He's still a long shot to make the final roster, but I always love when good dudes get a fair shot and Heaps is getting his. I can't find or recall the last KU QB to wear No. 13. Anyone?

• A couple of other interesting players will wear one of the most dynamic numbers in KU football history this fall. Freshman wide receiver Chase Harrell (6-4, 200) and freshman defensive end Dorance Armstrong (6-4, 225) will suit up in the No. 3 jersey made available by the departure of speed demon Tony Pierson. Of course, Pierson was merely the latest ultra-talented Jayhawk to wear No. 3, following in the footsteps of two-way threats Aqib Talib and Charles Gordon. In more recent years, and before Pierson got the number, former running back Darrian Miller, who had a monster freshman year, also wore No. 3. Of course, just because the number has been so good to those guys — or is it the other way around? — does not mean it's a guarantee that Harrell and Armstrong are in for big things. I happen to think both are, but back in 2008 it was none other than the infamous Jocques Crawford who wore No. 3, so take it with a grain of salt.

• I always love watching what happens to old numbers of superstars after they leave and this year will be no exception. For example, I remember thinking it was hilarious when Greg Brown (5) and Corrigan Powell (10) wore the numbers of Todd Reesing and Kerry Meier following their final seasons in crimson and blue. This year, the number that jumps out the most in that department is 31, worn for four years by Ben Heeney. Suiting up in Heeney's old number will be the only linebacker in the 2015 recruiting class, Osaze Ogbebor. It's far too early to know how well Ogbebor will rep the number, but here's guessing he'll get a chance to show it this season and won't be quite as much of a wild man.

• One other guy who joined Goodman in moving to a new number for the 2015 season was sophomore cornerback Matthew Boateng, who, last season as a true freshman, wore No. 1 and now will be wearing No. 33.

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Chris Harris: Better cornerback or conductor?

From the "in case you missed it" folder, check out the following video of former Kansas University football standouts Chris Harris and Steven Johnson leading a Colorado symphony in the KU fight song during a recent event put on by the Denver Broncos.

Harris and Johnson were two of a handful of current Broncos players who participated in a battle of the conductors event of sorts. Each player, including Texas A&M product Von Miller and Tennessee legend Peyton Manning, led the musicians in their school fight songs and fans were encouraged to vote for who did the best job of leading the band.

Here's a look at Harris and Johnson in action:

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Loss of Corey Avery brings questions to KU’s RB position

Kansas running back Corey Avery is dropped to the ground by Texas Tech defenders Jalen Barnes (19) and Pete Robertson (10) during the fourth quarter on Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014 at Jones AT&T Stadium in Lubbock, Texas.

Kansas running back Corey Avery is dropped to the ground by Texas Tech defenders Jalen Barnes (19) and Pete Robertson (10) during the fourth quarter on Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014 at Jones AT&T Stadium in Lubbock, Texas. by Nick Krug

For years, the one constant with the Kansas University football team — other than all of the losing, of course — has been the Jayhawks' ability to put together a deep and talented stable of running backs that, in many ways, have been interchangeable.

Whether you're talking about the steady presence of James Sims, the dynamic play-making ability of Tony Pierson, the do-it-all demeanor of Darrian Miller or even the always-ready-and-willing philosophies of Taylor Cox and Brandon Bourbon, the Jayhawks always had a few backs they could count on to handle the load in the backfield.

That continued into last season even after Cox and Bourbon went down with injuries in the preseason thanks to the emergence of freshman Corey Avery and newcomer DeAndre Mann. Together, that duo helped the Jayhawks transition away from Sims and into more of the same steady presence on the ground in an offense that struggled at most of the other positions.

Kansas running back Taylor Cox is tailed by Rice cornerback Malcolm Hill during the third quarter on Saturday, Sept. 8, 2012 at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas running back Taylor Cox is tailed by Rice cornerback Malcolm Hill during the third quarter on Saturday, Sept. 8, 2012 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

On Tuesday, however, first-year coach David Beaty announced that Avery had been dismissed from the program for violating team rules and, all of a sudden, things don't look quite as deep or dependable in the backfield.

Yeah, Cox and Mann will be back, but both are coming off of significant injuries and their health and longterm prognosis have to be at least a little bit of a concern. Cox hasn't played football since tearing his Achille's tendon last August and was out for an extended period of time before that because of a bum hamstring. And Mann spent portions of last season nursing head injuries, a plight that's bad news for any player but especially a running back who's asked to lead with his head and churn out those tough yards with guys flying at him from all directions.

Kansas running back DeAndre Mann finds a hole up the middle against TCU during the second quarter on Saturday, Nov. 15, 2014 at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas running back DeAndre Mann finds a hole up the middle against TCU during the second quarter on Saturday, Nov. 15, 2014 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

That leaves just a couple of other running backs to look at. And before the 2015 season is complete — or possibly even before it begins — both could find themselves being counted on heavily to handle the ball-carrying responsibilities for this year's team.

Both are newcomers, but junior Ke'aun Kinner at least has the advantage of having been in Lawrence for spring football.

By all accounts, the shifty, 5-foot-9, 180-pound spark plug was one of the more impressive performers throughout the spring and there's no doubt that he will have an important role for the Jayhawks this fall.

He's not quite Tony Pierson — but, really, who is? — but he does figure to bring that same kind of explosive potential every time he steps onto the field. That's good news for Kansas and a fun challenge for offensive coordinator Rob Likens, who, no doubt, is sitting somewhere right now trying to find creative ways to get Kinner the football in space.

After that, you're looking at true freshman Taylor Martin, a two-star back from Fort Worth, Texas, who was one of the better pick-ups in the 2015 recruiting class.

Martin, who chose KU over Colorado State, was receiving late interest from TCU, Illinois and Kansas State.

As a senior at Dunbar High, Martin ran for 1,500 yards and 25 touchdowns and earned a spot on the Star Telegram's Super Team second unit. For his career, he averaged 1,660 yards and 24 touchdowns over three seasons.

He also was a two-time district track champion in the 100-yard dash and his combination of blazing speed and good size (5-10, 185) make him a candidate to handle more carries than most freshmen, should KU need to lean on him right away.

Unlike last season, when KU was forced to move freshmen Joe Dineen and Darious Crawley from safety and wide receiver to help add depth at running back, the Jayhawks, at least as of now, are on schedule to have plenty of bodies to rotate in and out of the backfield, even without Avery.

The possibility always exists, too, that they could even add a back or two via transfer or late pick-up. Should that happen, the stable only gets deeper.

But, quality depth or not, with Cox and Mann coming off of injuries, the possibility remains that KU will be counting on two newcomers in a big way to keep alive the streak of solid play from the running back position in Lawrence.

As the past has shown us, that doesn't necessarily mean bad news. But it does put more pressure on the offensive line and quarterback and it does make the odds of KU continuing its run of solid running back play a little less than a lock.

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KU Football camps provide benefits to both sides

Tuesday marked the second day of the Team Camp circuit at the Kansas University football facilities, and, like Monday, hundreds of high school athletes from nearby schools braved the heat and took their turn on the turf at KU.

Monday's camp welcomed 17 teams to Lawrence and 16 returned for Tuesday, pushing the total number of campers in town this week to right around 800.

While the specifics of what they did and how they worked meant very little to the KU football coaching staff, the mere fact that that many bodies were able to come up to campus at one time to meet the coaches, see the facilities and experience the KU way of life qualifies as a huge development, even if it's not known for a few years just how big of news that is.

Think about it: Six or seven years ago, a young Ben Heeney showed up for these types of team camps and no one knew then that he would wind up becoming one of the best defensive players to ever come through KU.

A guy like that was out there this week. Whether anyone knew it or not was the bigger question.

Of course, there were plenty of guys that the KU coaching staff did know about. And getting to have them on campus in this type of setting was invaluable for the evaluation process.

One head high school coach told me that there were four or five KU coaches with eyes on one of his top players at nearly all portions of the live action the past couple of days. He added that, “there's always a KU coach within 10 feet of you when things are really moving out here. That's great exposure for the kids.”

And it's an even better tool for the KU coaches, who view recruiting as the lifeblood of the program and are in a position where they simply cannot miss on guys if they hope to get the latest KU football rebuilding project off the ground any time soon.

It's easy to watch highlight tapes or game film and hear good things about athletes from their high school coaches. It's another to be able to watch them in a camp setting like this, when it's hot, they're uncomfortable, they might be getting whipped by another team and they have to really show what they're made of to get through it.

Watching those things can be huge for these coaches and even the smallest misstep by an athlete can lead to him being crossed off the recruiting board.

That's not to say this is NFL-combine style serious business out here. These guys have fun, too. Music, from KU's insanely large loud speaker, is blaring from the hill, they have breaks built in for food and recovery and there's all kinds of camaraderie and sportsmanship on display, even with players and coaches from rival schools.

It's likely that the KU coaches only had a list of 5-10 guys that they truly wanted to watch at this week's camp. But the past is full of guys, in all sports, who got noticed because a coach was watching his hot-shot teammate and happened to catch a glimpse of what he could do. It's entirely possible that a few guys made that kind of impact — or at least were noticed — this week, and at a place like KU, where opportunity is plentiful, there's no telling what that could lead to in the future for either player or program.

KU summer camps will continue throughout the week, with a skills camp in Coffeyville tomorrow, a Friday Night Lights elite camp for high school prospects on Friday and a kicking academy on Sunday.

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