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LJWorld.com weblogs Heard on the Hill

KU athletics investigation focus of New York Times story

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The New York Times has [this story][1] in Sunday's edition that describes KU's use of a private law firm to investigate NCAA violations before the NCAA itself got a hold of the allegations..."The black binders contained more than 700 pages and documented the misdeeds of the University of Kansas men's and women's basketball and football programs. Among the findings were payments to athletes and academic fraud. The report suggested remedies like self-imposed probation and a reduction in scholarships.__The investigation and the sanctions did not come from the National Collegiate Athletic Association. Instead, they were produced by a private law firm stocked with former N.C.A.A. investigators and hired by Lew Perkins a day after he became the Kansas athletic director in 2003. [ Read more...][2] [1]: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/04/sports/ncaabasketball/04ncaa.html?ex=1173675600&en=33c5c3c08cf66b3c&ei=5070&emc=eta1" target="blank [2]: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/04/sports/ncaabasketball/04ncaa.html?ex=1173675600&en=33c5c3c08cf66b3c&ei=5070&emc=eta1

Comments

Confrontation 7 years, 8 months ago

Awww, sounds like there's a Texas fan who is really upset.

Sigmund 7 years, 8 months ago

"I'd rather have him tell me our problems than someone from the N.C.A.A.," Mr. Perkins said. Absolutely the correct decision. And before the raving and righteous indignation about the corruption in college athletics, have you looked at the NCAA rulebook lately? To say it is complex and filled with legalese is an understatement.

Bone777 7 years, 8 months ago

I'm not a big Lew fan, but that was genius. Nice work Lew, you earned your money, initially.

KU_cynic 7 years, 8 months ago

Thought it was funny that the article was on the front page of the NYT the day after our big basketball victory.

What was missing from the NYT article was some of the KU-specific context. Namely, under former AD Bob Frederick KU athletics was run a bit loosely -- not intentionally crookedly, but with enough amateurishness so that it would be unlikely that something, somewhere would not go wrong in KU Athletics. Fredericks was pushed out in favor of successor Al Bohls, who turned out to be a charlatan who pissed off the worst guy to piss off at KU - basketball coach Roy Williams. Bohls is fired, Williams splits anyway, somehow KU manages to hire Bill Self in spite of this maelstrom, and then Perkins is hired as the highest paid AD in the nation (I think he still is!). Whatever you think of Lew, he's no dummy. He sweeps house and makes KU athletics engage in a "big bath" so that any sizzling bombs don't go off under his watch and instead can be squarely blamed on his predecessors.

mom_of_three 7 years, 8 months ago

Very, very,very few(as in one or two) of the NCAA violations occurred during Bill Self's tenure as a coach, and should not reflect on this current team at all. As long as Lew Perkins keeps up the work he instituted when he began at Kansas, we should be able to keep our nose clean.

Mkh 7 years, 8 months ago

This was seemly a very smart move by Lew. He obviously knew that things were a bit out of hand when he took over and didn't want it slapping him in his face.

It's so surprise the reports about players getting paid, fraud, etc. Anyone who has been around this town long enough knows how the system works. But KU has always done a good job of covering it up, looks like Lew even took it up a notch and blew his own whistle.

Ken Miller 7 years, 8 months ago

Now we know MORE reasons why Lew was happily parading around with that stogie after the Texas game! Leave it to an East Coast goombah to clean up after that buffoon Al Bohl, and Bob "Blind in One Eye" Frederick.

Godot 7 years, 8 months ago

Maybe Perkins is worth the money after all.

Godot 7 years, 8 months ago

On second thought, no Kansas government employee should have a compensation package that is equal to more than 30 times the mean income of a Kansas citizen. In fact, no Kansa government employee should have a compensation package that is so opaque, so obfuscated by intricate financial arrangements, that the citizens do not even know how much he really makes.

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