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House budget negotiators stand by 4 percent cut to higher education

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Topeka — The House and Senate budget conference committee today started negotiations and the House stood by its proposal to cut higher education funding by 4 percent.

State Sen. Ty Masterson, R-Andover, (left) who is chair of the Senate Ways and Means Committee, and state Rep. Marc Rhoades, R-Newton, chair of the House Appropriations Committee, start conference committee negotiations on the state budget.

State Sen. Ty Masterson, R-Andover, (left) who is chair of the Senate Ways and Means Committee, and state Rep. Marc Rhoades, R-Newton, chair of the House Appropriations Committee, start conference committee negotiations on the state budget. by Scott Rothschild

The reduction would mean a nearly $10 million cut to Kansas University.

The Senate has proposed a 2 percent cut.

While the Senate plan has a smaller cut, it also reduces the state's student financial assistance programs by $437,832. The House plan doesn't cut those programs.

The House and Senate also differ on proposals to fund a medical education building at KU Medical Center.

The House agrees with Gov. Sam Brownback's plan to provide $3 million in the next fiscal year to jump start construction of the building. The Senate plan would allow KU to use funds for the project that are generally allocated to take care of deferred maintenance and repairs on university buildings and facilities.

Comments

yourworstnightmare 1 year, 9 months ago

Time for KU to become a private institution. The state would then never be obligated to give another dime to KU, and KU would be free to raise tuition and conduct its affairs without the stifling oversight of the anti-education and anti-intellectual Kansas legislature.

By their voting this legislature into office, the people of Kansas do not deserve a high quality and inexpensive state-aided research university.

Thinking_Out_Loud 1 year, 8 months ago

I don't know that KU would have to buy its own buildings from the State. The State wouldn't have much use for them without KU--it would be a pretty good trade-off for the State: "We will give you the infrastructure you already have; in exchange we never have to allocate funds to you, again."

Actually, no it wouldn't...KU would cease to focus on Kansas students. It would be very poor policy. But I think it would make this legislature happy.

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