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Should Kansas University red-shirt freshman basketball player Ben McLemore go pro after this year?

Asked at Hy-Vee, 4000 West Sixth St. on January 24, 2013

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Photo of Mary Pendry

“ I think he should. Why shouldn’t he?”

Photo of Paul Wharton

“ I think he should probably stay in school. I’m going to be selfish and say he should stay another year.”

Photo of Nikki Woolfolk

“ I swam for four years at KU. He has the talent to go pro, but it would benefit him in the long run to stay in school.”

Photo of Bruce Kesl

“ No. When they make a commitment to a school, I’d like to see them put education first.”

Comments

autie 1 year, 7 months ago

Say what you will but that boy is not ready for the NBA. Many aspects of the game he needs to imrove on.

1

DRsmith 1 year, 7 months ago

The only thing that matters is just about all the experts have him between the 1st and 3rd pick. You have to go in that situation.

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hiphopsux 1 year, 7 months ago

There is no need to even be thinking about this right now. Ben- you just go win a national championship with your teammates and the rest will take care of itself. Rock Chalk

1

JackMcKee 1 year, 7 months ago

Is this a serious question? Lol.

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jonas_opines 1 year, 7 months ago

If you're picked to be a lottery pick, you go. Could another year to develop help? Probably. Will it help his draft potential enough to be worth risking another year of injuries? Probably not.

2

Brandon Deines 1 year, 7 months ago

My god, anyone telling that kid to stay in school should be hit with a taser. He is going to be a top five pick at worst, and might go number one overall. An athlete's earning years end in their mid-30s. And that's if they don't get injured. You don't take away one year of your earning potential if the League is ready to take you and guarantee you a contract. He doesn't owe KU anything. Give us two-and-a-half more great months, then via con dios, young man. Thanks for being the most dynamic, explosive, fun-to-watch athlete I've ever seen at KU.

1

Russell Fryberger 1 year, 7 months ago

A scholarship someone with learning potential could have made good use of.

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parrothead8 1 year, 7 months ago

McLemore makes the school plenty of money that they can use on your "someone with learning potential."

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jayhawklawrence 1 year, 7 months ago

"An estimated 60 percent of N.B.A. players are broke within five years of retiring, and 78 percent of N.F.L. players are bankrupt or under financial stress because of joblessness or divorce within two years, according to a report by Sports Illustrated in March. The magazine also reported that many baseball players struggle financially after retirement."

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/06/sports/basketball/06nba.html?_r=0

My answer would be that it is up to Ben McLemore and my advice would be that it depends on how well prepared he is to use a relatively short career to secure financial security for himself and his family. It will also depend on what kind of people he is going to be associated with and whether he knows how to make good decisions regarding his finances and his lifestyle.

1

jonas_opines 1 year, 7 months ago

"An estimated 60 percent of N.B.A. players are broke within five years of retiring, and 78 percent of N.F.L. players are bankrupt or under financial stress because of joblessness or divorce within two years, according to a report by Sports Illustrated in March. The magazine also reported that many baseball players struggle financially after retirement."

Undoubtedly. These aren't people that we are idolizing for their brains or financial sense, ya'know.

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riverdrifter 1 year, 7 months ago

You go to college to increase your odds of having a successful career and maximize your potential. Check. Ben should go if he's projected as a lottery pick. Anyway, this decision is not made until the season is over. We've got six more weeks of kicking B12 butt to enjoy and then the big dance.

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Jonathan Fox 1 year, 7 months ago

I think all athletes should finish college. These kids, who know nothing about how to handle money are drawn in with huge lump sum contracts that last usually 5 maybe 10+ years, but eventually they stop playing. Very few make it into their 30s playing basketball, then what? Now they're a high school graduate with some college who can play basketball, that doesn't play very well in the job market.

These barely 20-year-old kids don't look 20 years down the road. These athletes are notorious for blowing every dollar they make as soon as possible. They don't plan on retiring from basketball at 30 years old. Not including the risk of getting injured early.

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