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What does the Fourth of July mean to you?

Asked at Massachusetts Street on July 4, 2010

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Photo of Jim Roberts

“Unfortunately, not as much as it used to. … It just doesn’t have the same pomp and circumstance that it used to.”

Photo of Jacob Hothan

“It means a good time, getting together with friends and family, having fun and enjoying life.”

Photo of Molly McDuffie

“It’s a time to get together with your family and friends and celebrate the history of this great nation.”

Photo of Jen Brooks

“It’s a patriotic time to celebrate our country and to be happy and grateful for what we have.”

Comments

independant1 4 years, 4 months ago

A day of blowing up the old stuffy europeon way and starting our own thing.

beatrice 4 years, 4 months ago

The 4th is apparently the day the dead return to earth and roam among the living.

Temper tantrum officially over?

whats_going_on 4 years, 4 months ago

hahahaha couldn't stand being gone for more than 2 days, could we? lol!

Aileen Dingus 4 years, 4 months ago

I went. :) It was great. They don't miss a beat.

ms_canada 4 years, 4 months ago

I don't have a green and white flag, can I still have some of those pancakes? Please

Deja Coffin 4 years, 4 months ago

This year it means I have a one month old.... and he sure is a sweet baby!!!

tomatogrower 4 years, 4 months ago

The 4th of July to me, is the beginning of a wonderful experiment in the equality of all man and woman kind. We still haven't extended rights to everyone, but we will despite those who hate groups of people and want to keep them down. It represents the attitude "Question Authority". Don't bow down to heirs of money empires. Don't bow down to stupid politicians or anyone who claims to have all the answers.

mr_right_wing 4 years, 4 months ago

The celebration of the birth of the greatest nation this earth has ever seen. Although it was not without dire consiquences; mainly the appalling treatment of Native Americans. (We've got slavery in there too.)

Celebrate with pride, but don't ignore the shame.

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