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What did you think of the repeal of ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’?

Asked at Massachusetts Street on December 23, 2010

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Photo of Dave Spears

“It doesn’t matter to me. I think it’s good to know what people’s preferences are rather than it being a surprise.”

Photo of Tori Katherman

“It’s about time. It’s long overdue. It was a ridiculous policy to begin with.”

Photo of John Bullock

“I’m in favor of the repeal because I think integrity, courage, honor and similar values have nothing to do with sexual preference. If they are willing to give up their lives for us, it’s the least we can do.”

Photo of Marie Adams

“I think they make a big deal about it. War is horrible no matter who or what you are. They should focus more on the war and bringing everyone home safely.”

Comments

TopJayhawk 3 years, 3 months ago

tori. What is long overdue is you getting a job.

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camper 3 years, 3 months ago

Much to do about nothing. There has always been a percentage, and it probably has not changed much over centuries. "At the end of the day" most men will always prefer women, and most women will always prefer men. This is the way it is always gonna be. Because there is a minority who have a different preference is really no problem and no care of mine. It does not worry me in the least, and I hardly think the change in policy will amount to a hill of beans one way or the other.

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JJE007 3 years, 3 months ago

Since the year 1492, the military has allowed nudity and ixnayed "fraternization". So it is written. So shall it be done.

Make up whatever story you want. It should make no difference. If it does, then it is a separate problem.

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BorderRuffian 3 years, 3 months ago

Wasn't DADT the love child of former POTUS William Jefferson (Slick Willy) Clinton, the entirely-without-morals-or-ethics poster boy of the Demolibs who are now praising Obiwan Kabama for overturning it? Besides, didn't Hillary stray over the line back in her hippy days?

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denak 3 years, 3 months ago

The whole purpose was to stop the wholesale discrimination against homosexuals. Before 1993, a person could be discharged for the mere suspicion of being gay. DADT was suppose to be a compromise. It was suppose to stop the witch hunting that was going on and was to implement a more judicial way to go about discharging an individual. Unfortunately, for over 13, 000 service members it didn't matter.

My personal opinion is that the repeal is a good thing for the military. And for what it is worth, not that it should matter, I am heterosexual, a former Marine and a NCO. I happen to have a little more faith in our men and women in the military. They will rise to the occasion and serve with their homosexual counterparts with the same professionalism that they serve with other minorities. Will there be some service members who make an issue of this. Yes, of course, just like there are those that commit crimes against minorities or women. But the answer is not to discriminate against the victim or the group that he or she belongs to but to prosecute the offender. As for the whole argument that homosexuals will be checking out the heterosexual men in the showers, I highly doubt it. Granted I was in the Marines many years ago, but once a person is out in the fleet, they don't shower with anyone else. They have a barracks room that has its own individual bathroom (unless it is connected to the next room) and a shower that has either a curtain or a door on it. And if I remember correctly, even the toilet has a door on it. If it creeps you out that much, just get dressed in the stall.

I think it is ridiculous that people has such an irrational fear of homosexuals. Do you really think that the repeal is going to unleash this wild sexual frenzy where all the gay men are going to start raping the heterosexual men? They weren't doing it before and they won't now.

And when all is said and done, if you are that repulsed by the idea of serving with a gay service member, then don't join the military. If you can't put the mission before your beliefs, then you should go elsewhere.

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amesn 3 years, 3 months ago

I also have a question for the military reps on this thread....what was the whole purpose of DADT in the first place?

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amesn 3 years, 3 months ago

Wow...the bigots are out in full force tonight! Why do people always stereotype all gay men to be extremely feminine..as one commenter suggested 'bringing out the pink camo' I have several gay friends and only half might actually fit one of these bigoted stereotype. My friend Aaron is built like a brick sht house, likes to fish, watches football and basketball religiously AND drives a pick-up! And no its not pink! How many of you have NEVER spoken of your spouse in the work place? I think most of us can say we have probably at one time or another made small talk with a fellow employee relaying the events of your evening with your spouse-made dinner, watched movie, etc. Can you imagine not being able to include your significant other in office get togethers-xmas parties, company picnics, potlucks, whatever it is you do...its really sad that the homophobes believe that gays want to use this as an opportunity to throw their lifestyle in their faces. They assume that they will begin to indulge sordid details to anyone and everyone and omg he just looked at me I think he's hitting on me! Puh-lease! Heterosexual men are the digusting pigs who enjoy bragging about their drunken conquests the weekend before, not the gays!

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RobertMarble 3 years, 3 months ago

I've got a mixed opinion on this- and I'll preface it by saying I'm an Army Veteran & NCO. I'm certainly no fan of the homos and find the concept rather disgusting, but that's just personal opinion. I don't think their sexual orientation should be any reason to discriminate as long as they do their job, same as everyone else...I also consider the bible types disgusting as well, but as long as they pull their weight I can tolerate them too. The main concerns I have are with how the implementation will proceed. The Military can occasionally be overzealous with implementation of new policies, especially when they're related to these high profile social issues. Unfortunately there will likely be many service members who will be 'made an example of' in the process of implementing this change. It will be terrible to see good Soldiers being dragged through UCMJ action simply for displaying the slightest negativity towards the new policy, but unfortunately it will happen....and the living arrangement situation should be evaluated. As someone said earlier on this thread, having to live in a crowded barracks sharing rooms & shower facilities are fact of Military life. Having personnel who could have sexual attractions to their roomates will cause problems; it's no different than allowing male personnel bunk & shower with the females. So that needs to be evaluated carefully.. all in all, if a homosexual is willing to serve their country honorably then they should be allowed to enlist...

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autie 3 years, 3 months ago

I think...that many of you...choose not to think....or don't think...and maybe cannot think. You all sound like a bunch of stupid high schoolers giggling with a Penthouse....like catfishturkeyhunter and/or Sgtskull...and the rest of the sophmore class idiots...

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catfishturkeyhunter 3 years, 3 months ago

I bet the number of code reds and blanket parties sky rocket lmfao

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catfishturkeyhunter 3 years, 3 months ago

Im gona be the odd man out and say "don't ask, don't tell" should still stand. I can say that because I have had the privilige of serving in the military. But because the morons in congress have decided against it, I say let the gays serve. Let them go see what that strange box is doing in the middle of the road deep inside Iraq and Afghanistan. Let them be the first one to enter and clear a house or other urban dwelling lmfao. They can also be the first to enter a dark tunnel in hopes of flushing the enemy. Heck, this new policy might just save the lives of hundreds of great soldiers, marines, airmen and navy personel. Why didn't someone think of this sooner?

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SgtSkull 3 years, 3 months ago

They have no business being in the Infantry. I can see them being a REMF though.

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50YearResident 3 years, 3 months ago

If you have not served in the US Military your opinion does not count. You can not comment about something that you know nothing about. You have had to be there to form an opinion. This comment is for all you non-military posters.

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rockchalker52 3 years, 3 months ago

shower time like "free porn?" be able to shower with the women? always lookin' for that edge, eh, valid?
that 'free porn' crack, I tell ya...have you ever actually met a gay person?

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i_have_only_valid_opinions 3 years, 3 months ago

I think it's absurd to believe that a gay person cannot contribute to military efforts as anyone else does. However, isn't shower time like "free porn" for them? If gender preference doesn't matter in the military, shouldn't I be able to shower with the women? After all, it's like a man being attracted to a man. No one can argue that! I think the answer is "unisex" everything. Open showers, bathrooms, quarters, everything.

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Randall Barnes 3 years, 3 months ago

So when is the military gonna issue pink camo ? mind over matter.

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RETICENT_IRREVERENT 3 years, 3 months ago

You should see the creations I can do with just a simple ribbon.

Once I even used a coat hanger.

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blindrabbit 3 years, 3 months ago

I served; the Navy has always been more tolerant than the other services. Keep in mind that with the all-volunteer service, the pool of people serving has changed somewhat. The Services have lowered the standards somewhat so as to meet their recruitment quotas; especially true for Army and Marine Corps. This coupled with the fact that many recruits come fro rural and especially from Southern latitudes; their exposure to more progressive attitudes about sexual orientation is oftentimes lacking. Also, the military whips up the "holy Christian" mantra about homosexuality ; read about religious discrimination issues at the Air Force Academy to get a flavor.

Anyway, all of this intolerance has biased the in-military survey that indicated that there might be major issues.. In reality the repeal will be no big deal once the bigots are convinced.

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Gandalf 3 years, 3 months ago

I think they just gave combat troops another target..

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infidel 3 years, 3 months ago

I am currently on my third tour as a deployed National Guard member. I care more about a persons ability to shoot, move, communicate and do their job, than who they are sleeping with. There have always been gays and lesbians in the military, now they can say so without being discharged.

As our 1SG put it. In the past, women, blacks and other minority's were not able to be in the military... 40 years ago I could not have been your 1SG ... we will adapt to this change as the professionals we are.

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consumer1 3 years, 3 months ago

I cannot help but wonder how many of the people polled have served in the military?

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deathpenaltyliberal 3 years, 3 months ago

"ksfbcoach (anonymous) says… ... The LGBT community wants special status, even though they make up less than 3% of the worlds population. Dodo birds."

No one is getting "special rights", just the same rights as everyone else. Dodo bird.

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beatrice 3 years, 3 months ago

I've said it elsewhere, but what this shows is that social conservatives are once again on the wrong side of history.

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Timothy Eugene 3 years, 3 months ago

Just another example of this administration ignoring the real crisis, the economy and lack of jobs, and pursueing a political agenda. The LGBT community wants special status, even though they make up less than 3% of the worlds population. Dodo birds.

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SouthWestKs 3 years, 3 months ago

The National Guard is a state unit not a federal unit.. I think the law was for the US military & not the states..

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SouthWestKs 3 years, 3 months ago

Sure glad this does not apply to the National Guards..

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g_rock 3 years, 3 months ago

Which one is Tori? I know, I asked. They didn't tell though....

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Fossick 3 years, 3 months ago

It would be difficult to think of an issue about which I care less.

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deathpenaltyliberal 3 years, 3 months ago

Another reason why this is the greatest country in the world. USA! USA!

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Tom Shewmon 3 years, 3 months ago

JAG's will be busy with a flurry of lawsuits in the future if I were to bet.

May God Bless.

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grammaddy 3 years, 3 months ago

Glad to see a stop to the government asking folks to lie about who they really are. Another hurdle jumped on the path to equality for all!

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HollisBrown 3 years, 3 months ago

If nothing else, it's another victory over the Westboro Baptist Church.

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HollisBrown 3 years, 3 months ago

It was a waste of time in the first place. I always felt it should have been Don't know, Don't Care. It shouldn't make any difference.

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Cait McKnelly 3 years, 3 months ago

I think we've come a long way from the Stonewall and White Night riots and the murders of Harvey Milk and Matthew Shepherd.

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pace 3 years, 3 months ago

I love democracy, I consider the repeal of 'Don't ask, don't tell, another hurdle we have jumped in building a stronger democracy. We are a country, stronger if we don't divide our-self by hate. We don't have to like each other but we should respect the persons.

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H_Lecter 3 years, 3 months ago

I'm looking forward to the producers of Avenue Q turning this into a musical.

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autie 3 years, 3 months ago

It was a ridiculous policy in the first place. Glad it is gone. Homophobes are horrible, horrible people.

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