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Are you interested in learning about other religions?

Asked at Massachusetts Street on January 26, 2008

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Photo of Nady Osmat

“Yes. One of my parents is Muslim and the other is Christian, so I’ve grown up with an appreciation for different religions.”

Photo of Meredith Morris

“Yes. I think it’s good to learn about other people’s religion and culture so as not to be ignorant of what other people base their beliefs on.”

Photo of Ray Harter

“To be honest, no. I only follow one religion: Christianity. So I just try to learn as much as I can about it.”

Photo of Jamie Reeve

“Yes. I’m actually taking a class on the religions of Japan. I think it’s really important for everyone to learn about various religions of the world and not limit themselves to what they’ve been taught or raised around.”

Comments

Sean Livingstone 6 years, 2 months ago

fleeba,

"more atheists tend to know more about all the other religions"

Probably I dispute this statement. I tend to think that people who know a lot about other religions tend to be agnostic... I could be wrong. It's never possible to prove that there is God, just as it's never possible to prove there isn't. Anyone can be right and wrong. It all depends how you define God, how different religions look at God... at the end, you may find one religion that define God the way atheist can never dispute.

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DirtyLinen 6 years, 2 months ago

fleeba (Anonymous) says:

"I do know a lot about other religions, and I've seemed to notice that more atheists tend to know more about all the other religions out there than one who is following their own religion."

The same would probably be true of agnostics. Or at least the smart ones. Nobody says anyone has to believe in anything, but to just reject any belief system out of hand without bothering to learn about it first is a tad close-minded.

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fleeba 6 years, 2 months ago

Are any of the atheists on this forum a member of the Rational Response squad? I am a proud member and have no shame in admitting that I don't believe in a higher power. I do know a lot about other religions, and I've seemed to notice that more atheists tend to know more about all the other religions out there than one who is following their own religion. As Ray pointed out: "To be honest, no. I only follow one religion:"

If you haven't checked them out, you should at: http://www.rationalresponders.com/

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bobberboy 6 years, 2 months ago

Has anyone seen Capt. Pissgums lately ?

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Sean Livingstone 6 years, 2 months ago

"compmd (Anonymous) says:

There are actually millions of gods (not exaggerating) in Hinduism, and some followers of the faith can even be living gods............. "

Partially why I'm saying that I could be wrong. But in generally speaking, that's the reason why I use the word "God". There are millions of gods, but each is not actually the God we know or represent. Each god is supposed to represent one philosophy or one aspect of life, and has the potential to become the bigger god.

http://www.religion-cults.com/Eastern/Hinduism/hindu4.htm

"each person is an emanation of God, is God." Quoting from the website.

"The different gods and goddesses of Hinduism represent various functions or aspects or attributes of this One Supreme Divinity, they are not separate gods but they are valid to worship, according to Hinduism."

So, if you interpret correctly, they also believe in one God, but worship God through many gods, and it's ok to worship one god and not the God. Thus, it can easily be interpreted as more philosophical than actually fearing God.

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scenebooster 6 years, 2 months ago

"the antichristian bigotry is piled high and running deep on this thread. "

Really? I mean, really, seriously?

"as a fundamentalist Christian, I sincerely appreciate the American value of freedom of faith,"

Hey, good for you! I would venture a guess that there are a lot of Hindu, Muslim, and Jewish Americans (and myriad others) who feel the exact same way.

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bobberboy 6 years, 2 months ago

Yes, all of them except Islam. I already know to much about them - and I don't care to know anymore.

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preebo 6 years, 2 months ago

Absolutely, while I am a Christian, I have studied other religions. I took a few Religious Studies courses at the University of Colorado as well as some Religion and First Amendment Rights courses at Harvard Law. I am still willing to learn more. For instance, just last year I read some scholarly commentary on The Koran and its interpretations. I felt that it was time that I learned more about what a full one-third of the planet based its belief structure on.

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Flap Doodle 6 years, 2 months ago

snap writes:

still

having

a

wonderful

internet

life

.

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Marion Lynn 6 years, 2 months ago

"Are you interested in learning about other religions?"

Marion writes:

No.

I have studied religion already and know all that I need to know.

All religions are essentially the same, primitive, stone-age, creepy voodoo, superstitious nonsense.

What is there to study besides the mass murder, the pain caused to millions and the hypocrisy for which religion has been responsible throughout history?

oh wait

we don't study that

never mind

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cool 6 years, 2 months ago

always interested in spiritual quest

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camper 6 years, 2 months ago

Amazing. Tolstoy was aware of, and wrote about many of these topics in his later writings. Great stuff if anyone is interested.

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DirtyLinen 6 years, 2 months ago

GretchenJP (Anonymous) says:

"Nope."

Gretchen, please keep your answers brief, I don't have all day to sit here and read them.

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Das_Ubermime 6 years, 2 months ago

I would have loved to write a research grant which ended "Of course, there is the possibility that our research in the destruction of the entire world. So how about that money, eh?"

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RETICENT_IRREVERENT 6 years, 2 months ago

Das... Maybe we will learn the fate of Schrdinger's cat? But only if the black hole implosion thingy does not occur.

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RETICENT_IRREVERENT 6 years, 2 months ago

Das, Higgs boson, it's the "God" particle...

Apparently, this coming May, about the same time you may receive $600 from the Government, the LHC at CERN will be up and running. This supercalifragilisticexpialidocious particle collider is supposed to be powerful enough for us to see actually observe God.

If the Higgs boson is observed all the mysteries of the universe will be revealed... The secrets of the Illuminati, the location of Rosenkreuz's crypt, how the Priory of Sion is related to the Bilderberg Group, and the revelation that the Bilderberg Group meeting is really just a big orgy with temple prostitutes preforming Hieros Gamos.

On the other hand this supercalifragilisticexpialidocious particle collider may have the effect of creating a "artificial black hole" and our world, maybe the galaxy, will implode on its self.

Either way I say if you are not, it's a good time to start praying.

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compmd 6 years, 2 months ago

"Hinduism (I could be wrong), stresses more on thinking and philosophies, and very little about God"

There are actually millions of gods (not exaggerating) in Hinduism, and some followers of the faith can even be living gods. You are applying the general monotheistic Christian identity to Hinduism, as evidenced by your use of "God" with a capital G, but this concept is entirely incompatible and is clearly outlined in the Bible why the concept is incompatible. See? We have learning about religion taking place right here!

The more we choose to explore things we do not know, the more we will understand. Why people choose to not do that thus choose to limit themselves is beyond my comprehension.

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Sean Livingstone 6 years, 2 months ago

What are the major religions, apparently, atheism is considered a religion:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/60/Worldwide_percentage_of_Adherents_by_Religion.png

Nearly a third of the world are Christians. Why? You all know the answer.

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BABBOY 6 years, 2 months ago

Sure. Kind wonder from the question what the "other religions" are, but will take the question as meaning other then your own. I think it would be an interesting. Wonder who, if anybody, is correct or if that is even the point.

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Sean Livingstone 6 years, 2 months ago

"right_thinker (Anonymous) says:

Can anyone forward some links to The Church of Albert Gore, Jr. please."

You mean this one?

http://nobelprize.org/

or this one?

http://www.usgbc.org/

If you think Nobel Prize and Green Buildings are religions, go ahead.

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Das_Ubermime 6 years, 2 months ago

RI,

"Thats still a belief structure ( A belief of disbelief)" You are thinking of an unbeliever: someone who does not believe the idea is possible. I am a nonbeliever: someone who does not agree with the idea.

"There is the OTS:" All hail the Church of the BIG OTS! Who is the minister? TOB? Ms. Canada? Hopefully not that Jonas guy... Did OMB die for our sins?

"What about 'Higgs boson' and 'On the Origin of Species'" Who again and why? I think that Darwin's book is for the most part correct, but I think the same about my college calculus textbook. I wonder if I could be sworn in with my calculus textbook...

"If it quacks like a duck:" It could be somebody hunting ducks...

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DirtyLinen 6 years, 2 months ago

Das_Ubermime (Anonymous) says:

"Thanks DL, you demonstrated my point better than I could have on my own. While the Book of Job is about judging God's motives for events which happen during life, you stretch it to mean that tithing (a action to assure one's place in the afterlife) is bad."

Thanks, DU, you disproved your own argument better than anyone else could have.

I said nothing about God's motives nor tithing. The book of Job, as a matter of fact, pretty much excludes God's motives; he is said to have a purpose for what he does, but he does not have to tell man what that purpose is (at least not now). But while it doesn't say why God chooses for certain things to happen, it does exclude certain reasons ... bad things happen even to good people, and are therefore not a punishment for sin.

And remember that Job was not an Israelite. Yet he was still a good and moral person, he still had a relationship with God, he still was entitled to the rewards of living a just life and maintaining that relationship. The physical church and its priests are therefore unnecessary to either a person's morality or the rewards of that morality. Sounds like that may have influenced Luther, who was after all a Christian scholar, to rebel against the practice of indulgences, or even that the clergy is responsible for salvation at all (as opposed to the individual faith of the "saved").

But I suppose if you want to take the limited view that Job is just about questioning God's motives and demanding answers, you wouldn't see that. Just as if you don't look any further than the beatitudes from the Sermon on the Mount, you wouldn't understand how someone could use it as a justification for war. As I said, thanks for disproving your own point ... if you had a deeper understanding of those parts of the Bible, you might have been able to understand how they might have influenced historical events.

"By the way, nice example of why some people dislike Christians so much ..."

By the way, DU, nice example of why you and others dislike Christians or people of any other religion so much. Um... when did I say I was a Christian? Just because I've actually taken the time to learn a little about the Christian religion (and others), just because I defend some of those beliefs and advocate for a better understanding of their faith, I must be a Bible thumper, right? Nice A$$umption (if incorrect), and a fine example of phobia regarding any mention of religious beliefs. Maybe you're not scared to learn about various religions ... but I had given you more credit (apparently undeserved) than to think your aversion was based on deliberate close-mindedness.

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RETICENT_IRREVERENT 6 years, 2 months ago

Das, "I have no belief in a higher power" - Thats still a belief structure ( A belief of disbelief) "no organization with others of like mind" - There is the OTS... "no religious icons or texts" - What about "Higgs boson" and "On the Origin of Species"

If it quacks like a duck...

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Das_Ubermime 6 years, 2 months ago

R_I,

I have seen many cases where it has been made to be a religion, but in my case it is not the case. I have no belief in a higher power, no organization with others of like mind, no religious icons or texts. Hard to have a religion without any of those.

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Marion Lynn 6 years, 2 months ago

Does it make any difference whether or not there is an external reality?

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RETICENT_IRREVERENT 6 years, 2 months ago

Das, Isn't Atheism/Agnosticism a form of religion?

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Das_Ubermime 6 years, 2 months ago

Thanks DL, you demonstrated my point better than I could have on my own. While the Book of Job is about judging God's motives for events which happen during life, you stretch it to mean that tithing (a action to assure one's place in the afterlife) is bad. You brought forth a interpretation of the Sermon on the Mount as a rationale for war, even though it implores one to turn the other cheek and blesses the meek and peacemakers. You, like most people, are selectively editing the Bible to fit what you want to say. This is why studying the religion itself is secondary in my mind to understanding what people want their religion to say.

By the way, nice example of why some people dislike Christians so much. That last sentence is a good example of how people like you are unwilling to accept other views. It cannot be that I have a point, it must be that I make this argument because I am insecure about my world view. Do you behave this way towards all views, or is there something in particular about atheism/agnosticism which you find difficult to accept?

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DirtyLinen 6 years, 2 months ago

Das_Ubermime (Anonymous) says:

"Will the Book of Job assist in an understanding of the Reformation?"

"From Job 17:11-13, the Vulgate Latin quotation Post tenebras spero lucem ("After darkness I hope for light") or Post Tenebras Lux has been adopted as a motto for several organizations, mostly the Protestant Reformation."

I never discussed this with Martin Luther so it's difficult to say, but I suppose one might argue that the relationship between man and God as described in the book of Job might have had something to do with Luther's dissatisfaction with the administration of the church, particularly his objection to the notion that it was the clergy who bestowed salvation, rather than God himself and his arbiter, the Christ.

"Does the Sermon on the Mount impart some understanding of the Crusades?"

The Lord's prayer (found in the Sermon on the Mount) includes mention of bringing God's kingdom to earth, and for God's will to be done here. The section of the sermon where the prayer is found is a discourse on actully doing the will of God rather than just putting forth appearances. I can see where a desire to actually do something to expand God's earthly kingdom and enforce his laws, rather than just singing loudly in church on Sunday, might lead to packing up and going to war against people who weren't part of that earthly kingdom.

I could go on, but really ... maybe there was a lot of interpretation of the Bible ... but without that Bible to interpret, the events of which you inquire may never have happened at all. If the Crusaders had not been Christians, if they had worshipped the sun or trees or nothing at all, would they have gone all that way to fight?

Better still if the Crusaders ... and the leaders of the church ... had a better understanding that the Muslims believed in most or all of the same principles laid out in the Sermon, would they have even thought the Crusades necessary?

"Religion affects people and can play a role in events, but it is just one of many factors."

It is, nonetheless, a factor.

Yes, there have been many events in history based on interpretations of religious beliefs. Some of those beliefs, however, are pretty cut-and-dry, yes-or-no items. For example. while there have been nearly infinite interpretations of who or what a supreme being is or is not and does or doesn't do, whether or not there is some kind of supreme being is pretty much an "I belive" or "I don't believe" question. And you can't deny that the answer to that question is a major determinant in the very nature of a culture ... including our own.

What are you afraid you might hear if you were to study various religions?

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Kathy Gragg 6 years, 2 months ago

right_thinker (Anonymous) says:

Can anyone forward some links to The Church of Albert Gore, Jr. please.

he is a southern baptist if I recall.

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buffalo_star 6 years, 2 months ago

Myth helps cultures to deal with that which can not be understood or explained. I would suggest all christians read God is Red by Vine Deloria

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Das_Ubermime 6 years, 2 months ago

DirtyLinen,

Will the Book of Job assist in an understanding of the Reformation? What role did Exodus play in the Inquisition? Does the Sermon on the Mount impart some understanding of the Crusades? All three of these events (which, before anyone brings it up, I am neither criticizing nor blaming on Christians) were heavily driven by religious issues, yet they had more to do with each culture's interpretation of religion than what the Bible actually says. Religion affects people and can play a role in events, but it is just one of many factors.

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bearded_gnome 6 years, 2 months ago

and, appreciating that American right, freedom of faith, it is incumbant upon me to respect it for others here too.

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bearded_gnome 6 years, 2 months ago

thanks dirty-linen for a thoughtful post. the antichristian bigotry is piled high and running deep on this thread. as a fundamentalist Christian, I sincerely appreciate the American value of freedom of faith, apparently some of the above posters do not and engage in catagorical bigoted statements to prove it. I have been appreciating howmany things we have in common with the nonterrorist islamic beliefs.


Merrill, put a sock in it, you give the tiredest most pathetic antireligion rant of all. try this little fact on: in the 20th century far more people died and were tyranized for unbelief and godlessness, than any for faith. think of this short list as a starter: Saddam, Po Pot, edie amin (sp?), stalin, hitler, mao and vietnam after we pulled out. try totalling those. and, I could add most of a dozen more names. these killed and oppressed in the name of atheism, godlessness, and unbelief. does it disprove atheism, no.


now, just to return to my premerrill topic, note that I respect atheists, and was one until I actually read what is in the Bible. overwhelmingly, the bigots above have no familiarity with what is actually written in the Bible. they should start with learning about the judeochristian heritage of this country.

lawrence was founded by *abolitionists, the christian fundamentalists of their time. remember, a rifle and a bible to go with settlers to Kansas!

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Tom Shewmon 6 years, 2 months ago

Can anyone forward some links to The Church of Albert Gore, Jr. please.

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cool 6 years, 2 months ago

yes, would like to know more about VEDANTA there is a vedanta society in Kansas City, Missouri it is their 60th annniversary in the USA.

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DirtyLinen 6 years, 2 months ago

Das_Ubermime (Anonymous) says:

"Not particularly. I'm up for learning more about different people, but not so much their religion."

I agree with RI that this may be all but impossible.

I remember a course I took in the History of Modern Europe way back in my undergrad days. The professor started off the first day by saying that one day we would find ourselves at a party discussing how the start of WW-I could be traced back in a direct chain of events to Martin Luther nailing his proclamations on the door of the church. (To my own surprise and great bewilderment, I caught myself doing exactly that several years later.)

Can you really begin to understand the history and culture of Europe (that so greatly influenced our own) and totally ignore the influence of the church? Can you really understand the differences between peoples of European vs. Middle Eastern descent without knowing something about Christianity and Islam?

If you really wanted to learn more about a particular person, do you think it might lend some insights to know that the person attended 12 years of Catholic school, was an altar boy and sang in the choir, goes to church every Sunday and reads the Bible daily, etc.? And while you might not agree or even respect that person's beliefs as they developed over the years of that upbringing, don't you think it would be nice to know a little about why they think as they do, before condemning their opinions? (I'm not saying you in particular are disrespecting or condemning anyone's beliefs, but it does happen.)

It would seem beneficial in the resolution of conflicts to be able to understand the thinking of the other party(ies).

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Kathy Gragg 6 years, 2 months ago

I have to admit I enjoyed western civ. I & II asw ell as eastern civ., but I had great instructors too. I love the serie by Joseph Cambell . http://www.themonastery.org/catalog/thepowerofmyth-p-225.html?language=en

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The_Original_Bob 6 years, 2 months ago

Marion/NickDanger/Hewalksagainbynight/Girlfriend/et al -

That

was

an

impressive

and

incomprehensible

rant.

Kudos.

Thanks,

TOB

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Marion Lynn 6 years, 2 months ago

Well, there is a lot more religiosity around than religion but all religions are pretty much the same' "My Way Is The Best And Only Way". Of course all religions are completely without rational foundation and all are based on ancient stone-age superstitions so I suppose that it realy doesn't matter.

As long as people refuse to see the world as it is, rather than how their superstitions would have it be and regard the world in which we live as a biosolids hole, not much will change.

Any religion which has to have had literally millions of books written about how to interpret it is in real trouble anyway.

All you have to do is look around and you will know that something greater than yourslef created all this, set it in motion or was/is a giant spaghetti monster; it makes no difference.

The fact is though, that none of you, in spite of your sirty little religions have the foggiest notion as to what or who that thing was/is.

You instead incorporate into your primitive belief systems an image of that thing which makes you feel comfortable when you would be alot better off just accepting the the idea that you don't know, most likely cannot know, will probably never know and stop worrying about it and go out into the world and do some good instead of trying to spread your irrational beliefs to people who are happier than you are.

As for me, I get a kick out of keeping Plastic Jesii on the dashboards of my cars.

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hottruckinmama 6 years, 2 months ago

I think it would be interesting. It might give you an idea of what makes people of a particular faith act or do the things they do. What makes them "tick" so to speak. I can't imagine what the harm would be. Unless of course you have so little faith in your own God that you are afraid to learn about someone else's. Kind of like ducking your head in the sand.

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overplayedhistory 6 years, 2 months ago

Denak I was raised in the catholic church. I was educated by Nuns. I figure I have been to over 1000 masses. I have had my share of scripture. It must really bother you when someone escapes the dogmatic brainwash camp. The normal Christian reaction is to feel sorry for me because the enlightenment never caught on. If that is not condescending I don't know what is. Religion is nothing more than the political institutionalization of spirituality. The fact that you get upset is what we love because it reaffirms our feelings about it. If Christianity was not sooooo pretentious then you would not try to convince us of how pretentious we are. I am sorry there are so many dense people on this thread that can think for themselves. I am sure you will find more people on your side of the pew in Wichita. I hear it is a good time to buy a house.

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Kathy Gragg 6 years, 2 months ago

Sorry I that was to be profress

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Gareth 6 years, 2 months ago

The bus driver's comment is Kansas in a nutshell:

"I only FOLLOW one religion, so I don't want to LEARN about any others." Nobody's asking you to follow the others, dumbass, only to educate yourself.

Remember kids, in America, "Book-Larnin' is of De Debbil!"

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Kathy Gragg 6 years, 2 months ago

All I know is those who prefess to be so godly tend to forget those things when away from church. Most faiths hold to the same point that there is one being all knowing/powerful. When considering the things going on in the world I find that hard to believe.

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Das_Ubermime 6 years, 2 months ago

RI,

What people practice and what their religions actually says are often two different things. The culture of a people influences their interpretation of their religion. While the opposite is also true, it is to a much smaller extent.

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Sean Livingstone 6 years, 2 months ago

Once you learn about religions, you will start to realize that it's more philosophical than actually religious. It's how to live your life using God, while philosophies are how to live your life without using God. For example, Confucius ethics and Buddhism have principles to guide to human or civilization how they should behave, and stress nothing about God. Hinduism (I could be wrong), stresses more on thinking and philosophies, and very little about God. The God-centric philosophies become what we know as religions, while non-God centric philosophies become religious practices (not religion). Laws are practicing philosophies for society, how they should behave and live their life, making a sensible society that is generally peaceful.

The "fear of God" principle is what causes some issues throughout the world today, regardless of any religions. My God is the right God is just as harmful as no God at all, but it heavily depends on how a society is formed and the basis of a society. Godless societies can be just as peaceful as those who fear God. Tibetans live, in fact, in a Godless society with religious philosophies of Buddhism. Societies using God as excuses to attack others are more dangerous than societies that are Godless. China, a Godless or at least non-God centric society, is less of a threat militarily than many God-centric countries (though we like to say they are dangerous, since when?).

That's the fundamental reason why government needs to take religion out of politics. The loss of God in a God-centric society can be extremely dangerous. A society without God in the first place can never be dangerous at all, if it lives without God for a long time.

No one on earth can prove that there is God, nor anyone can prove that there is none. So, keep your religion to yourself.

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RETICENT_IRREVERENT 6 years, 2 months ago

Das, If you are "into" learning more about different people... You are are, ipso facto, by defacto, learning about their religion.

You can take people out of religion, but you can not take the religion out of people.

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jonas 6 years, 2 months ago

Denak: "Perhaps if you got off your high horse and actually studied religion and philosophy you wouldn't be so quick to judge:"

Perhaps I have, and have seen little that dissuades me from my opinion. I think spirituality, the belief in a higher order or purpose within things, is quite beautiful, and a potentially helpful, even necessary component of our existence. The FOUNDERS (caps only in lieu of italics) or foundational figures of these religions often seem to epitomize this concept very well. The religions themselves, founded in their name, seem to be, from my somewhat learned observation, to be concerned merely with human power.

If that is to be considered an overtly hostile opinion then too bad. We are capable of thinking dissent, even towards things which you hold to be valuable or important. This is an opinion forum, and opinions are being presented. Deal with it.

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Das_Ubermime 6 years, 2 months ago

Not particularly. I'm up for learning more about different people, but not so much their religion.

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Paul R Getto 6 years, 2 months ago

"Oh, how enlightened you are all. You put yourself up on a pedestal because you are soooooo much more intelligent than those who believe in a religion and yet, you make the same mistake they do." +++++ Intelligence and faith are not easily linked. No belief, properly and faithfully followed, which says we are our brother's keeper, can harm society. Religion when twisted and abused, can cause damage and needlessly divide us from confronting our larger civic duties. Religion should be an adult choice; it is partially sustained through conditioning of the young when they are more easily scared ":if I should die before I wake, I pray the lord my soul to take." All religion has potential and we evolved to be a spiritual species. Religion should not be mocked and 'god' whatever we call her is everywhere.

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RETICENT_IRREVERENT 6 years, 2 months ago

My Supreme Being can beat up your Supreme Being(s).

I have my own personal "Faith Club"

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sunflower_sue 6 years, 2 months ago

always. (I even like to learn about what twists the minds of the Phelps clan.) I find it all interesting.

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denak 6 years, 2 months ago

wow, it is only 10:35 in the morning and already the religion bashers are out in force. Of the 11 posts, 9 are outright hostile towards religion.

Oh, how enlightened you are all. You put yourself up on a pedestal because you are soooooo much more intelligent than those who believe in a religion and yet, you make the same mistake they do.

You are just as condescending, ignorant and annoying as those who believe that they have the only one true religion.

Perhaps if you got off your high horse and actually studied religion and philosophy you wouldn't be so quick to judge.............. which is presumably what you disdain about Christians and other religious practictioners.

What is that saying about hating what one sees in the mirror?

Dena

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Kathy Getto 6 years, 2 months ago

Mythology in all forms has some utility and all religions essentially teach the golden rule, but, as you pointed out, Merrill, the "church" is usually the source of distortion and political turmoil.

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yourworstnightmare 6 years, 2 months ago

Yes, and I also read Harry Potter and watch fantasy movies and read the comics. All carry about the same weight in terms of truth and reality.

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H_Lecter 6 years, 2 months ago

I enjoy all the different flavors.

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herbalife4life1 6 years, 2 months ago

All religions are based in pagan religions and I find it humorous when Christians get so offended when I say to watch this movie...

http://zeitgeistmovie.com/

They most find it difficult....Those who have taken authority as truth, rather than truth as authority. -Gerald Massey

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Richard Heckler 6 years, 2 months ago

Would the world be a more peaceful place IF religion were only studied and not worshipped?

The church on the other hand is questionable....

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overplayedhistory 6 years, 2 months ago

I love Jesus yes I do, I love Jesus how about you. I only follow one narrow spaghetti noddle. So I try to learn as much as I can about that noddle as I can.

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The_Original_Bob 6 years, 2 months ago

I've been immersing myself into Scientology. We are the authority. We know what's right. We will save this world. I'm still having issues with all these Thetans in my body, but Mr. Tom said I'm on the right track and just need to give them more money and all will be ok. He said one day I might even be able to meet noted Scientologists Beck and Jason Lee. Oh goody.

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JJE007 6 years, 2 months ago

TRUE religions = true abominations +/- 1 exclusivity squared, carry the 3, divide by TRUE. So it is written. So shall it be carried to the fourth.

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classclown 6 years, 2 months ago

I already know all that I need to know about them. They're all a bunch of bs.

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jonas 6 years, 2 months ago

I tend to be, but also must admit that I tend to view religion in and of itself as mostly a perversion of pure spirituality. A subversion of the message by the word, so to speak.

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satar 6 years, 2 months ago

I think that when we limit our selfs to only way of thinking ie:Christianity. we forget about the other religions that have been around a lot longer. Some pepole that think that christianity is the only one are the ignorant ones.

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pusscanthropus 6 years, 2 months ago

Hail to the Flying Spaghetti Monster and his divine noodly appendage! To see how our religions have gotten it all wrong, go to:

http://www.venganza.org/

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prospector 6 years, 2 months ago

Yes, though I have learned much seated at the knees of Flying Spaghetti Monster, I am always ready to learn more on any subject. I do have a problem with the falsehood spread i.e. "virgins in heaven" type information that is spread like it is an election or competion for our souls. Learning the truth is a good thing.

http://www.boingboing.net/2005/08/19/pastafarianism-flyin.html

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