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Do you still practice the faith in which you were raised?

Asked at Massachusetts Street on February 26, 2008

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Photo of Mandy Denton

“No, I do not. I was raised Catholic, and as I got older I started to disagree with some of their principles.”

Photo of Ishaan Saxena

“No. I was raised Hindu, and now I’m an atheist.”

Photo of Stephanie Drahozal

“Yes, I do. I’m Catholic, and I still go to church. I believe it, so I’ve stuck with it.”

Photo of Jonathan Zani

“No, I do not. I was raised Nazarene, which is a sect of Christianity, and I didn’t feel like it was much of a faith, more of a network.”

Comments

cool 6 years, 1 month ago

yes but need to practice better !

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cool 6 years, 1 month ago

yes but now also include Buddhism and Vedanta with it

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StirrrThePot 6 years, 1 month ago

Raised Catholic by parents who were raised Methodist and Lutheran (and joined the Catholic Church as adults). Joined the Church as a teen (mom and dad gave me the option) and more or less haven't looked back. I may not be what some people would consider a "good" Catholic--i.e. we've used contraceptives in the past, I sometimes forget on Lenten Fridays and accidentally eat meat, etc. That said, I am a good person and do my best to lead the life God would want me to...and I happen to be a Catholic Christian. It is not a perfect Church, but I say let the members of the perfect church step forward, mmmkay? What, wait...there isn't one? Hmmm, interesting. :)

I went to various protestant/evangelical/charismatic youth groups with friends as a kid but never felt at home. I don't agree with EVERYTHING the Church mandates, and I believe that is a healthy thing (following blindly does not suit me either). It does mandate many things I do agree with, and it is between me and God to sort out the rest. I love the Mass, I love the church I currently attend, and feel at home with the parishoners and pastor there. I do not push my faith onto others, in fact I take the attitude that it is my business, not anyone else's.

I have had plenty of friends who felt they had to give me their anti-Catholic opinions, rather than just respect my beliefs (or, here's a a thought, how about ASKING me what it is all about instead interjecting ignorance at it??). I have also taken alot of heat from the "raised Catholic/not Catholic anymore" crowd --I am reminded specifically of a lecture given to me by a guy at an interfaith Bible study in college. He talked to me like I was the human embodiment of all Catholics, as if I was the one who told him he'd be damned to hell if he didn't go to confession or say 18 Hail Marys on the third Friday of the second month following the feast of St. Bonaventure. When he was done with his tirade I just said "Look, I'm just here because I thought this was a nondenominational bible study and there's free food. I could care less what you do."

That sums it up for me I think.

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RedwoodCoast 6 years, 1 month ago

I was raised Methodist. I no longer practice and no longer believe. It just doesn't work for me like it does for other people. If I were to become religious, Buddhism is probably the closest match for me.

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Jason Bowers-Chaika 6 years, 1 month ago

Raised Baptist, explored fundamental evangelical Christianity in college, tried to pray myself straight. I even almost got married believing that if I lived like a hetero then I would become what society wanted me to be. Now I am recovering from the damage caused by religious Bible Thumpers with literal interpretations and a legalistic practice of religion.

Now I am happily active in Metropolitan Community Church in Topeka. A church that welcomes all. Now I am living a life as a Gay Christian as God intended and created me to be.

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Multidisciplinary 6 years, 1 month ago

geniusmannumber1 (Anonymous) says:

Multidisciplinary- I find it hard to believe that your story represents anything other than one individual's experience. In any event, I'll give you the benefit of the doubt and say you're referring to a much, much older generation of Catholics.


Hi.Not sure if you mean just "my" experience, or that the experience was involving just one Catholic man. If you mean just one man, to tell the truth I had to sit back and count. Over 40 years, it added up to over ten. From born Catholics, to men marrying into the faith, to men nearly marrying into (going through all the classes, but she called it off a week before the wedding). The stories are so incredible it's too much to write. I do know what you mean about some of it being older catholics. While some of these men were my age or younger, a few were much older, one a severe Roman Catholic who's "perfect Catholic son", once out of the house, became a minister for a much less strict religion, and his poor daughter is so messed up, she's never married. The son went on to be fruitful, they've got more kids than any other family I know, except for one older Catholic family here in town. When an issue came up, and I discussed it with a male friend my age, he said that the man should talk to a younger priest, and these were not the current ideas of the church. He certainly didn't abide by any restrictions of any kind. There is quite a distinction between small KS town Catholics and Lawrence, but there are plenty of man hating women here in the Catholic church. That's for sure. I used to hang out with a group of them, and well, it's no wonder they were single, I can see why a man would look at them and think, well, maybe I could do without them for the rest of my life. :D


its_getting_warmer (Anonymous) says:

But Marion will shoot at either of them:


That was just too quick and funny warmer. I'm sure Marion got a good laugh out of it too.

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H_Lecter 6 years, 1 month ago

I learned what real pain was as a Methodist attending Catholic Schools. As a senior at Catholic boarding school, I decided during Mass one day going up for communion would atone for some of my impure thoughts and deeds. So, Father Mike dipped the wafer in the wine, placed it on my tongue, and said the blessing. As a polite and confirmed Methodist, I said, "Thank you." Since I didn't say, "Amen", Father remembered I wasn't Catholic. After Mass, he reminded me that as a heathen (non-Catholic) I should not take communion in the Catholic church. That ended any thoughts I had of becoming a priest. I think it was that same year that i was shocked to learn that we Methodists don't drink alcohol, which explained the juice for communion...my first full fledged disagreement with my church's doctrine. (I'd been corrupted by the Catholics)

Organized religions are such interesting sets of other people's rules. Personally, I like to think God is OK with my occasional imbibing...compared to the occasional impaling

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sunflowerks54 6 years, 1 month ago

I went to bapbist and pentecostal churches growing up, but as an adult I became presbyterian and have remained so. One of my children is also presbyterian, but the other one has chosen to be methodist. Overall, I believe that we are all God's children, and no one church has all the answers. Treating our fellow human beings with respect and dignity is the true religion.

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i_tching 6 years, 1 month ago

The trouble with Pascal's Wager is that it works for everything, not just some sort of freaky sky-fairy thing. It could as well apply to the proverbial orbiting teapot, the FSM, or Reverend Moon. Hence it is absurd.

It seems to me that the one answer that religions all apply to the big questions is simply "Stop making sense." That isn't good enough.

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stinkfist 6 years, 1 month ago

Anyone thought of making their own church, or some other believer cult? Maybe having a few of you self proclaimed independent believers in something or another come together? You might fit nicely in a group that you so wish/believe not to be a part of.

Don't invite me. I'll stick to wine, beer, song, literature, myself and my own.

Irrelevant/wasteful subject.

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GretchenJP 6 years, 1 month ago

My mom ~ Mennonite. My dad ~ Methodist. They grew up goinig to church but they didn't take me to church so I wasn't really raised under any particular faith. Now I'm studying Wicca.

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ImTooOldForThis 6 years, 1 month ago

H e double toothpicks no.

I was raised catholic. Seems to be a prerequisite of athiests such as myself.

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KSChick1 6 years, 1 month ago

Recovering footwashing Southern Baptist

freaky handsy sunday school teacher and all-really turned me off of "religion"

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Sean Livingstone 6 years, 1 month ago

Do you think worshiping money is a religion?

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jimincountry 6 years, 1 month ago

Actually, I'll probably just be thinking " God Help Me" and hope that works.

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jimincountry 6 years, 1 month ago

I intend to make a perfect act of contrition just before I die which will insure my getting to heaven no matter WHAT!

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Windlass 6 years, 1 month ago

Even though my religion to me has come to be more of an "east meets west" estrangement I have always revered the Catholic mass, the Holy See, the body and blood of Christ (accept this wafer; drink from this cup), the formal "stiffness" of mass (wear your Sunday best), large cathedrals, prayers, sermons, etc...just that it all felt so much more like "God was with you" as in genuflecting right there on the pew with you. And that if I did go back to church, it would still be the magnificient Catholic Church, the same one that our mother and father left, and us with them, for reasons I didn't understand for many years later, and it had to do with the Second Vatican (I would come to realize). For a time in my adult life I thought that I might pick up any one of the eastern religions, feeling that "faith" should bring peace, that God is merciful, and the world is good. Well...okay, I've been wrong before. Nothing really pans out for me, except that I do know there is a God who watches over me. There's no doubt in my everloving mind that there is a God, and a Heaven. And I think that when we die, or will soon die, is when maybe even the athiests are ready to receive for there was a time I called myself an athiest, then an agnostic, but now I can recall many times that "He carried me." I do look forward to seeing my father, and my mother, again, and everything will be allright.

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Nick Vaughan 6 years, 1 month ago

It really erks me to hear people drage the Catholic Church throught the mud about its priests. Dont think for one moment that that stuff doesnt exist in other faiths. Its more rampid in many other secs. Did you know churchs are required to carry insurance for this purpose. I have a brother in-law who has worked many sex abuse cases within the religious rehlm.

The only reason the Catholic Church gets put on the fron page is because priest abstain from sex. A practice that is uncomprehendable to others. And for that reason alone, the Catholic Church is made the poster childe for sex abuse within religious organizations. Thank you media. Why dont you go cover some of the other sex scandals in the other 33,000 denominations.

For you information, a lot of sex related cases have nothing to do with the affiliated church, and often times have to do with the staff and parrisioners that attend the church as volunteers. This thred is defect from the beginning and provides a house for people to feel comfort with thier abscense of uniformity. Its sad to see people who are so far away from "home" they will never truely be at rest.

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yeah_right 6 years, 1 month ago

I wasn't really raised anything. Started going to church in Junior High. Quit when I got into college and have now returned and I love it now more than ever. I think it is because I don't have to go now but I want to. I go to a Baptist church and the Pastor is great. I don't claim to be Baptist, though. I am Christian. Things just seem to go much better and make more sense when I acknowledge God's love.

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Marion Lynn 6 years, 1 month ago

NP:

Too funny!

Believe me, Google is getting more God-like every day!

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sunflower_sue 6 years, 1 month ago

R_I, I really needed a laugh today...thanks for supplying one. :D and, God bless you!

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Dwight_Schrute 6 years, 1 month ago

"Chosing a religion should be an adult activity. Then, at least you know what you are getting into."


When the adults around him became agitated because of the growing number of children, Jesus said, "Let the little children come to me."

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75x55 6 years, 1 month ago

But then again, Made_in_China , some people will obviously never be adults.

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Marion Lynn 6 years, 1 month ago

Well, I did find this church which looks interesting:

http://www.subgenius.com/

Then there is this one:

http://f.a.c.t.s.tripod.com/HomeChurch.htm

Decisions, decisions!

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RETICENT_IRREVERENT 6 years, 1 month ago

Well, you know what they say... Practice makes perfect.

That's what being a Protestant's all about. That's why it's the church for me. That's why it's the church for anyone who respects the individual and the individual's right to decide for him or herself. When Martin Luther nailed his protest up to the church door in fifteen-seventeen, he may not have realised the full significance of what he was doing, but four hundred and ninety-one years later, thanks to him, I can wear whatever I want on my John Thomas. And protestantism doesn't stop at the simple condom. Oh, no. I can wear French Ticklers if I want. I can go down the road any time I want and walk into Walgreen's and hold my head up high and say in a loud, steady voice, 'I want you to sell me a condom. In fact, today, I think I'll have a French Tickler, for I am a Protestant.' . .

Bunch of damn heathens...

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75x55 6 years, 1 month ago

"Chosing a religion should be an adult activity. Then, at least you know what you are getting into."

I wonder. Seems like a lot of adults have come to their majority without the benefit of realizing that people are fallible, and those figures of authority that disappointed them as children in one way or the other are just that - fallible. After all, the best of men are men at best.

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Paul R Getto 6 years, 1 month ago

Chosing a religion should be an adult activity. Then, at least you know what you are getting into.

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Calliope877 6 years, 1 month ago

My dad is a hardcore protestant and my mom is agnostic. Since dad was an a$$hole when it came to going to church (I was pretty much forced to do so until I got into junior high) I veered towards my mom's way of thinking.

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ChristmasCarol 6 years, 1 month ago

In Sunday School my teacher could not answer how dinosaurs existed because I was infatuated with them. I guess I was an early evolutionist. I also then had some problems socially in the school so, yea maybe it was a network.

I guess that the whole thing is not to my liking, that is the bible, and even less is the way some or most Christians act or behave.

I have found more Christians that like to argue about how to apply Bible verses and excuse the behaviors they have.

I still use Psalms and Proverbs as a resource but for the most part stay away from other "Christians" because of the fact that I really do not think they gather to do much any more that is very good.

I am now of the religion of

Doctors without Borders is my church.

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its_getting_warmer 6 years, 1 month ago

But Marion will shoot at either of them...

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Marion Lynn 6 years, 1 month ago

Well, I'd still rather laugh with the sinners than cry with the saints!

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geniusmannumber1 6 years, 1 month ago

Multidisciplinary-- I find it hard to believe that your story represents anything other than one individual's experience. In any event, I'll give you the benefit of the doubt and say you're referring to a much, much older generation of Catholics.

Marion-- Speaking as someone who was raised Catholic (you know, this new study suggests that there may be as many as 10% of the US population who are "recovering"), was in Catholic youth groups, and who infrequently attended Catholic school, I've gotta say the Billy Joel song is much, much too inapt. I suggest "Catholic School Girls Rule" by the Chili Peppers.

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Windlass 6 years, 1 month ago

No, of the Catholic faith I am not a devoted patron. I'm a long way from home.

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Esq2eB 6 years, 1 month ago

I am a Dyslexic Insomniac Atheist.

I sit up at night wondering if there really is a doG.

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Das_Ubermime 6 years, 1 month ago

Wow a post where someone employs Pascal's Wager and claims that atheists are afraid! I've never seen that one before. I guess I'm just going to have to let my fear of what happens if I'm wrong lead me to live a life without fear. Better go out and get me some religion quick!

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Dorothy Hoyt-Reed 6 years, 1 month ago

I attended a Wesleyn (at that time Methodist) church. Our Sunday schools were divided by sex, until we were in our teens. We had a really interesting teacher, and we started asking questions about why Baptists are different than Methodists, and what is the Jewish religion, etc. He told us he would do some research and that would be next week's topic. The next week, we were again divided up by sex with 2 new teachers, learning all the cutesy bible stories again. I stopped going to church. Since then I've tried to experience every religion possible and find spiritual things in all of them. I guess that makes me a Unitarian; although, I don't belong to that church either. Some would call me an atheist or an agnostic, but that's not true either, because I believe in god, I just refuse to step in line to any one dogma.

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Agnostick 6 years, 1 month ago

I'm a "Recovering Catholic," who, like buffbonzai, started wondering about things at an early age. As I progressed through my teens and 20s, I questioned it even more. When the James Porter scandal broke, I knew I didn't want to worship at same altar as pedophile priests.

Despite the catchy nickname I've been using on web forums the past several years, I now consider myself a "freeform Deist" with heavy leanings towards Buddhism.

I see God as the "ultimate communications strategist," who tailored and customized all the important messages into packages that individual societies and cultures could work with. That's why you can see so many similarities in the world's different religions: compassion for our fellow beings, humility, the incredible power that comes from defeating the worst parts of ourselves--something I struggle with on a daily basis.

Men--fallible as we are--have perverted and distorted these things, marginalized their importance in favor of pushing and promoting things like pride, arrogance, greed... and of course the sickening compulsion to assure ourselves that, "My God/religion is the true one, the 'right' one, the 'correct' one... all the others are wrong, blasphemous, the work of the Devil" etc.

For the record: I don't think Catholics, as people, are bad. The vast majority of them are very good, including the priests and the nuns. What happened is that when the troublemakers came in, and were discovered, the church hierarchy decided to sweep it all under the rug, hide it... and in the process, put more children at risk.

Look at what's happened in the RCC the past 40 years, and what happened to Enron, and there are some mind-boggling similarities!

That's all I have to say about that...

--Ag

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dajudge 6 years, 1 month ago

I, too, am of that ever increasing faith called "Raised Catholic". Now, I worship the sun god of the ancient Inca.

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The_Original_Bob 6 years, 1 month ago

Baptised Methodist as a child and continue to be so today.

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mom_of_three 6 years, 1 month ago

Definitely a big no. Didn't go to church as a young kid, but started at 12 when we moved closer to the grandparents, who made us kids go. I didn't like it, because my paternal grandparents would tell me other denominations were wrong, and would not go to heaven, and then I was thinking who actually knows who is right. Religion didn't seem to practice tolerance or understanding to me.
Still trying to find a place to worship where I feel comfortable, after all my bad experiences. Haven't found one yet, but I am still looking.

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Lisia 6 years, 1 month ago

Another former Catholic here. 12 years of Catholic schooling pretty much beat it out of me instead of driving it into me. So now I'm a heretic. I enjoy the tradition and pageantry of church services, though. And I can understand where a church (any religion) can offer people security and hope. I just don't share that.

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sunflower_sue 6 years, 1 month ago

I guess I practice my own version of the faith that I was raised. I was raised a Christian (Deciples of Christ), but I am no longer a church goer. I stick to the scripture that says church is "wherever two are gathered in His name..." (Church can be full of people that I'd just as soon avoid.) I don't believe in "one true religion." I don't believe that I need to preach in order to be saved. I refuse to believe that non-Chirstians are condemned. I'll just believe what I believe and pray that God is as forgiving as I believe He is. I pray daily. :)

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coolmarv 6 years, 1 month ago

If I die having faith that there is something better out there then I will die a peacful death, no matter the means. If I beleive and have faith and there is nothing more after I die then I will not know any different. I will take my chances. If I don't believe or have faith and I die and there is more I may be on the outside ever yearning to get in. I don't know what is out there but I am a much happier person inside having my faith. Do I have questions about a higher power? Sure. Do I have doubts that there is a higher power? No. I don't spend too much time debating whether there is a God or not a God. Those who do may have something to fear. Why else would those posters post the same comments everytime the topic comes up. Maybe they are trying to convince themselves there is not a God. I do think the Catholic church has left itself open for ridicule many times. That is unfortunate. With each failure a lesson is learned. All or most Catholics do not think they are better than others and none should. . Many posters only say negative things about Catholics. Nothing better to do I suppose. Maybe they have no faith and don't care or know any better. I will remain strong in my faith.

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its_getting_warmer 6 years, 1 month ago

Well, Cool is not a Mormon....since they are obviously all members of a cult sect.

But he thinks Jews could shop at a yet-to-be-again-renovated Merc, with his designs-by-Cool.

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not_dolph 6 years, 1 month ago

cool (Anonymous) says:

YES


So which is it cool - are you Jewish, or are you practicing New Age stuff?

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moo 6 years, 1 month ago

Hehe, "secular progressive extremists," cue scary music. "Don't go in there! The secular progressives might ask politely that you continue to practice whatever religion you choose and teach your children whatever you want and simply refrain from forcing them to choose your way of life! AAAAAAAAh!!!!!!" Figment of your imagination, RT.

Hm, started out as a child with some Unitarianism. Dabbled in Christianity in high school after I realized that accepting friends' invitation to youth groups spared me the "you are going to Hell" speech and the pitying looks that seemed directed at a Leper standing directly behind me. Realized at some point that it's just much better to decide for one's self what to believe and insteading of accepting something you're told without question.

Having said that, everyone should believe whatever they want as long as I can do the same. True to "secular progressive" form. : )

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Das_Ubermime 6 years, 1 month ago

Parents were non-believers who told us kids to do whatever we want just so long as we don't try to convert. Don't see how that really qualifies as being raised one thing or another, but I am a non-believer as well. One of the only sibs who turned out so.

Now I am married and my wife is a Christian. We both agree that there ain't much point in raising them anything in particular. Just let them know what is out there and let them decide.

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Stain 6 years, 1 month ago

Yes: Faith in my own conscience and knowledge of what is right and wrong. I don't need any institution to tell me what is right and what is wrong. The blessing of an institution all too often is a substitute for people following their own conscience, and an excuse to do wrong and be "forgiven" by their church which they think then makes it all ok.

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acg 6 years, 1 month ago

Yes, I do. My folks taught me well. They said, whenever you see a preacher/priest coming your way, run the other direction because you can bet most of the time they're up to no good. Huh, whaddya know?

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Stain 6 years, 1 month ago

right_thinker are you a Christian? Are you an example of a Christian, and Christian attitudes and actions?

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Tom Shewmon 6 years, 1 month ago

In an age of uninterrupted self-gratification, faith has largely been kicked to the curb.

Secular-progressive extremists have branded Christianity as bad and continue to push their agenda.

We've accepted that educating our children dare not mention God.

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jumpin_catfish 6 years, 1 month ago

My dogma was lost in an enigma! I wander the American wasteland of belief systems.

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Multidisciplinary 6 years, 1 month ago

Ah, yes..Catholics. And the people they end up mating/marrying. Been there done that. The women hate sex and think it's sinful. The men tend to be fairly victimized too. The men, after a 30 year marriage admit they've had sex a couple of times after Polish weddings, that's when their (low count) children were conceived. Men who've slept on the farthest 8 inches of the mattress, to keep from causing an onslaught of religious terror. Men who hide dating to the time their elderly mother is Rving South in the winter. (Adult children, yes this is why your Dad didn't remarry, it was because of your GRANDMOTHER's harpish, selfish Catholic manner) Men who don't know up from down. Thinking a woman would not only feel ^&* about oral what ever on him, but be freaked if something that went into a vjj would be LOATH to put back into their place above neck and lower than nose. So sad.

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tvc 6 years, 1 month ago

I went to church by myself when I was younger. I think it got me through some difficult times, but I am now an agnostic. I do not believe in a personal god. Py said it all!

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Marion Lynn 6 years, 1 month ago

So!

Is it true as Billy Joel wrote, that "Catholic girls start much to late" or not?

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rtwngr 6 years, 1 month ago

Some of the comments remain about themselves. The comments that bother me are the ones where they rationalize their beliefs (or lack of them) by making condescending comments about another's beliefs.

Personally, I was raised a Baptist and am now a Roman Catholic. I am happy and my family is happy being Roman Catholic. My wish is that more Roman Catholics were more Roman Catholic.

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trinity 6 years, 1 month ago

i think we need a "who was raised catholic but no longer is" forum all to itself! i'm in that number, also.

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craigers 6 years, 1 month ago

I absolutely do. God is just as real today as He was to me when I was younger. Probably more to be exact.

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OldEnuf2BYurDad 6 years, 1 month ago

""Yes, I do. I'm Catholic, and I still go to church. I believe it, so I've stuck with it."

  • Stephanie Drahozal, Lawrence High School senior, Lawrence"

Forgive my cynicism, but that's just it: as adults, we Americans tend to stray. At 18, she may not have hit that bump, yet.

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average 6 years, 1 month ago

Jeffersonian Deist, as I was raised.

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jonas 6 years, 1 month ago

Hmmm. . . . cue the "Lawrence hates religion" post in t-minus 10. . . . t-minues 9. . . .

Unfortunately, it will probably just be b3 or another flamer of that type.

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Pywacket 6 years, 1 month ago

Blue~ see ya at the airport. I could use a carnation.

Mom--Catholic. Dad--agnostic. Me--atheist. I had a hard time believing the religious stuff as a kid (and my dad, for the record, never once tried to influence me away from it). I went to church with my mother sometimes, went to various Protestant churches with friends (whose families were pretty devout), but it never made much sense to me. After struggling with feeling guilty if I didn't say daily prayers. I had something of an epiphany as a teen, and realized that there was nothing to feel guilty about--nature and science explained everything beautifully and logically.

The guilt melted away and I never looked back. Now, I liken the years of clinging to doubtful beliefs about a god to the image of children clinging to doubtful beliefs about Santa and the Easter Bunny when they're old enough to know better. They so WANT to keep believing, and not to disappoint their parents (who still maintain the fantasy and will be sad when their children stop believing), but there comes a time when they must stop fooling themselves. That's how I felt when I let go of the idea of a god (much less the whole elaborate emaculate conception fantasy, etc), and allowed myself to embrace the truth.

The truth can be lonely (you know that this life is all there is, and therefore doubly precious), and carry a great deal of responsibility (you must be honest and ethical and decent because it's the right thing to do, not because you'll face hellfire if you aren't and paradise if you are), but it's also bracing and comforting--especially when horrific, inexplicable random tragedies or atrocities happen.

You no longer have to scramble to make excuses for a "loving" god who "works in mysterious ways" and had "other plans" for, say, the 3-year-old in MO last year who was brutally beaten, raped, and murdered by her mother's husband and his friend. As an atheist, you can know that these people were simply depraved--that this should NOT have happened, and that anyone in their right mind (human or godly) who could've intervened would have done so.

Same with natural disasters, terrible crashes, or industrial accidents, in which some are left crippled or disfigured for life, and others are just snuffed out at the height of their lives. It's comforting to know that no "higher being" plans such tragic and premature ends for these people, or thought it would be a great idea to "test" 12-, 5-, or 2-year-olds who are suddenly left orphaned. These things just happen, and they are NOT a part of any grand plan.

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preebo 6 years, 1 month ago

Nope. Raised Catholic. Now more of a Heretic.

...at least according to "The Church."

Still Christian though, just more realistic.

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JJE007 6 years, 1 month ago

I was raised Catholic and told we were the only true religion! Now I am a double naught true religion spy, working as a tripple agent. My true affiliation must remain secret until I receive the new identity and enter the realm (politics).

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jonas 6 years, 1 month ago

Nope, I started out a presbyterian and now worship the Giant Slurg Beast of Hyperandromache VIII, of course.

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blue73harley 6 years, 1 month ago

I was raised in the People's Temple but that didn't work out as well as I had hoped. So I became a Branch Davidian. There was an "accident" in Texas (which I cannot be held responsible for) that caused me to leave the church. Since then I have become a Moonie and I look forward to meeting each and every one of you real soon.

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buffbonzai 6 years, 1 month ago

Hell no! I was raised Catholic, started to question it as early as the fourth grade and now I'm a full fledged atheist.

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