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Would you compare different hospitals if you were going to have an operation?

Asked at Massachusetts Street on July 2, 2007

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Photo of Janell Runnebaum

“Of course, especially if I’m going under the knife. I would like to look at their customer satisfaction, service and credibility. The price really isn’t the issue.”

Photo of Wayne Ricks

“I would definitely compare. I would look for a specialist if it was something serious, but if it was minor, I would stick with LMH where my kids were born.”

Photo of Michael Nelson

“Because insurance weighs so heavily in such a situation, I would look at that first. I would look around to find somewhere that I’m going to be treated promptly and correctly, so I don’t end up having to go back again.”

Photo of Elizabeth Miller

“I would probably compare. The insurance coverage is the No. 1 thing, and after that would be the level of care. As long as my insurance covers most of it, the price doesn’t matter.”

Comments

Marion Lynn 6 years, 9 months ago

ms_canada:

Happy Maple Leaf Day!

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ms_canada 6 years, 9 months ago

Did any of you know that today is our 140 birthday. We have been having some great celebrations. Down in our river valley last eveining at 11pm there was the most spectacular fireworks display. Thousands of people flocked to the valley. It was super duper. Just a bit of trivia FYI.

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sunflower_sue 6 years, 9 months ago

YES! Tonsils out (the most I've ever had done)...pick a good local Dr. Anything major...pick a good Dr. at the best hospital. Not all hospitals have the proper equipment for certain treatments. When it comes to loved ones, I'd travel far and wide to get what is considered the best.

Thankfully, St. Lukes is just a hop, skip, (and a life flight) away. I think they are a most excellent hospital for hearts. KC Med is great for trauma. The furthest I've traveled for a specific hosp. was to UCSF.

I have a friend who makes regular trips to Houston for her little one. Heartbreaking! They are down there so much that she is considering moving there. She is at the end of how much time she can take off w/out being fired. Ironically, she is a nurse.

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trinity 6 years, 9 months ago

crazyks i had to laugh-when i first glanced at your post, i coulda SWORN it said "if you were only having a mole removed, staff04, you can have that done at your OFFICE"!!!! i wondered if there was some sort of fly by night mobile mole removal service available...

my mind truly is a strange place to be. :)

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Linda Endicott 6 years, 9 months ago

If you were only having a mole removed, staff04, you can have that done at your doctor's office.

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prospector 6 years, 9 months ago

I would consult H_Lecter to find out where the pickings were slim.

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ms_canada 6 years, 9 months ago

Not having to worry about insurance here in my country, the thing that would concern me about surgery is my doctor. I would have to go to the hospital where my doctor practices. My surgeon was recommended by my family doctor whom I have had for many, many years and trust implicitely. Now then, I know this surgeon is excellent but boy oh boy, the hospital is something else. I had no fear, really, concerning my treatment, but this hospital is in the heart of the city area where the street population is greatest and they flock to the emergency dept. like flies to honey. A wait in emerg is an experience, I can tell you. It will either disgust you or break your heart at the misery you will see amongst these unfortunate street people. I guess, if I really could not go there, I would have to find a different surgeon. But hopefully I will never again need surgery. We have 4 major hospitals in our city and numerous clinics where one can go for over night (if necessary) treatment of minor ailments. One very near my house is where I would go for a belly ache or small wound. It is an excellent facility with a most caring staff of doctors and nurses with all manner of testing equipment. A fairly new concept in medical care in our province.

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sgtwolverine 6 years, 9 months ago

If it's something relatively pedestrian, then I'll stay local. If it's something really weird, then I live half an hour from what has been ranked one of the better research hospitals in the nation, so I'll stick with that.

But in general, I do my best to avoid hospitals as much as I can.

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DaveR 6 years, 9 months ago

Hello Jonas,

House is compelling, not because he is snide & gets all the good lines, but because he looks real. I long ago spotted the show's MO: Find something obscure in the PDF & then work backwards to get your story. And if you watch the credits, it's clear the show is a 60 minute infomercial for GE & various other equipment & drug manufacturers. So somebody thinks there's something real about the show.

The majority of us know fake doctors better than we know any real ones.

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jonas 6 years, 9 months ago

DaveR:

You, errr. . . do know that Dr. Gregory House is a fake doctor on a formulaic TV drama on Fox, right? I don't know if you want to use him as the basis of comparison, especially after posting a huge amount on a type of medicinal practice I would guess large numbers of folks view as plain superstition. Me, I try to keep an open mind about such things, but on the surface it doesn't sound good, ya'know.

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Flap Doodle 6 years, 9 months ago

Call the funeral homes in town & see which hospital is the most frequent flier.

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staff04 6 years, 9 months ago

I would much rather go to a specialty hospital if I am having a specialty surgery. If I am having a mole removed, on the other hand, I would gladly have it done at LMH.

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Azure_Attitude 6 years, 9 months ago

Maybe do the doctor's chart too. See what kind of day he's having.

The insurance company dictates many of my medical decisions, but at least my coverate doesn't require referrals anymore, much to my doctors' delight.

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insiderinfo 6 years, 9 months ago

Yellow House Owners 4th, 5th, and 6th Constitutional Rights were Violated. Keep up with the illegal investigation here at http://yellowhousestore.blogspot.com/

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DaveR 6 years, 9 months ago

This is an elective operation?

I wouldn't normally post the following in a public forum, though it ought to be shouted from the rooftops:

You get your time, date & place of birth. You set up your astrological natal chart. You find a way to read it for the medical condition you have. Yes, this is rocket science, but it can & should be learned.

You look at the planetary positions for the date of the operation. You follow the rules on page 609 of H.L. Cornell's Encyclopaedia of Medical Astrology (1933, many reprints).

The No. 1 rule, which has been known & observed for more than 2000 years: You do not operate when the moon is in the sign ruling the part of the body to be operated upon.

Surgery is somewhat better now than it was a century ago. Trivial operations rarely go bad, even when planetary energies are against it. On the other hand, if you're checking out various hospitals, then maybe your operation isn't so trivial.

So, for example, I would avoid elective heart operations on Sunday, July 15, and Monday, July 16, 2007, as the moon will be in Leo both days. Since elective operations rarely happen on weekends, the day to watch out for is Monday the 16th.

Around 28 days later, and every 28 days after that, the moon will again spend around 30 hours in the sign of Leo, which, in medical astrology terms, represents the heart. Aries is the head, Taurus the throat, Gemini hands & arms, Cancer the chest, Virgo the stomach, Libra the kidneys, Scorpio the genitals, Sagittarius the legs, Capricorn skin & bones, Aquarius (where the moon is today) blood & ankles, Pisces the feet, but this is only a sketch.

As for Dr. Cornell, he had this to say:

"In my years of practice as a physician, I have, by the use of Astrology, been able to very quickly locate the seat of the disease, the cause of the trouble, the time when the patient began to feel uncomfortable, as based on the birth data of the patient, and this without even touching or examining the patient, and my intense desire to get this knowledge and wisdom before students and Healers in a classified form, is the reason for this Encyclopaedia." (pg. 502)

Think about this the next time you watch Dr. Gregory House flail about. It's your life the doctor is playing with, after all.

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BABBOY 6 years, 9 months ago

Why does the insurance company get to decide? Because they have monopoly and get to control everything? Which are they going to control -- costs or quality?

It makes a big difference which doctor you get and good doctors are only at certain hospitals. KU Med is good in some areas -- but not all such as heart conditions (major lawsuits in the 90s and lawsuits which were not frivolous with people getting really hurt by some poor service). I would go to Kansas City and pick upon reputations which have been earned over a long period of time.

Nurse case managers that you talk to at companies do not advise on quality, but instead advise on who they are friends with or that their company use. They do not really know.

Reticent_Irreverent, I thought that was pretty funny.

Have a good day.

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RETICENT_IRREVERENT 6 years, 9 months ago

Talk to the Chaplains, compare the rates of performance of "last rites".

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blue73harley 6 years, 9 months ago

Like Jonas sez - the insurance co. pretty much calls the shots.

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jonas 6 years, 9 months ago

I pretty much go where the insurance tells me to go. But I haven't had a severe issue since I got the kidney stone after our honeymoon in Europe (we both got them, damn places where wine is cheaper than water!) and I just had to go once, to get some morphine. I went to LMH, cuz it was closest.

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KS 6 years, 9 months ago

The hospital is secondary. The doctor is primary and it depends on which hospital that person can practice. .Personally, I go to KC for medical treatment. Lawrence is too small. LMH is too anti-competitive. Competition is good, even in the medical field. Makes better doctors and facilties.

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