Archive for Saturday, February 3, 2018

Bangladeshi-born Lawrence scientist, father of 3 now facing deportation after 30-plus years in U.S.

Syed Jamal, seen here with his daughter, two sons and his nephew during a family vacation in Tennessee, is facing deportation after more than 30 years in the United States. Jamal, a Lawrence research scientist and academic, has three American-born children, all of whom attend Lawrence schools: Taseen, 13, Naheen, 12, and Fareed, 6.

Syed Jamal, seen here with his daughter, two sons and his nephew during a family vacation in Tennessee, is facing deportation after more than 30 years in the United States. Jamal, a Lawrence research scientist and academic, has three American-born children, all of whom attend Lawrence schools: Taseen, 13, Naheen, 12, and Fareed, 6.

February 3, 2018

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Syed Jamal has lived in the U.S. for more than 30 years. He has studied here, earning multiple degrees from area universities, has worked here, as a research scientist and an educator, and has chosen to raise his family here.

America is the only country Jamal’s three children have ever known. But, having overstayed his visa and having failed to leave the country voluntarily, the Bangladeshi-born Lawrence father is now jailed and facing deportation. His family wants him home, and they’re asking their community for help.

“I don’t know if he’s going to come back or what,” Angela Zaynub Chowdhury, Jamal’s wife, told the Journal-World earlier this week. “The kids keep asking me, and I have no answer.”

Chowdhury, who came to the U.S. from Bangladesh after marrying Jamal in 2002, said Jamal was readying their kids for school last Wednesday morning when Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents pulled up outside the family’s Lawrence house. The arrest, which took place in Jamal’s driveway, was a “complete shock,” she said.

“They just showed up,” Chowdhury said. “They put handcuffs on his hands, and they wouldn’t let us hug him or talk to him.”

Chowdhury said her husband was immediately taken to the Morgan County Adult Detention Center in Versailles, Mo., where he awaits deportation. Jamal overstayed his visa several years ago and was given the option to return to Bangladesh voluntarily, Chowdhury said, but decided to stay in the U.S. because of their three American-born children.

Jamal has no criminal record in Douglas County.

After processing her initial shock, Chowdhury began reaching out to friends in the Lawrence community, with the hope that letters written on Jamal’s behalf might convince the government to grant him a stay of removal.

As of Friday afternoon, an online petition created in his name had reached more than 1,500 signatures and counting. Marci Leuschen, a science teacher at Free State High School, launched the campaign after hearing of Jamal’s situation earlier this week.

Leuschen described Jamal as a devoted family man, scientist and community leader in her online petition page, a sentiment she later expressed to the Journal-World. She said Jamal served on the site council for several years at Sunflower Elementary School, and has also worked on equity initiatives at Southwest Middle School, where his daughter is currently a seventh-grader.

“In a world where parents might not necessarily go volunteer and help with the school, this man was doing that and exceeding that with site council and things like that,” Leuschen said.

Lawrence father Syed Jamal, pictured here with his children, was arrested last week and is now facing deportation after more than 30 years living in the U.S. In this photo, the research scientist enjoys a light-hearted moment with his daughter, Naheen, and sons Fareed (on shoulders) and Taseen, during a family vacation in California.

Lawrence father Syed Jamal, pictured here with his children, was arrested last week and is now facing deportation after more than 30 years living in the U.S. In this photo, the research scientist enjoys a light-hearted moment with his daughter, Naheen, and sons Fareed (on shoulders) and Taseen, during a family vacation in California.

Leuschen said her son attended both elementary school and middle school with Jamal’s oldest, Taseen. Over those years, Leuschen said, she saw firsthand Jamal’s commitment to his children’s education.

The avid classroom volunteer even applied for a spot on the Lawrence school board last spring. His goal, Jamal told the Journal-World at the time, was to foster connections between schools and parents.

Jamal arrived in the Kansas City area as a student in 1987, attending Rockhurst University. He earned bachelor’s degrees in biology, biochemistry and philosophy in 1997, before earning his master’s degree in pharmaceutical sciences from the University of Missouri-Kansas City in 2001.

When the Journal-World interviewed him in March 2017, Jamal had put aside his doctoral studies at the University of Kansas, and was working as a research scientist at his brother’s startup company, Jives Biotech, in addition to teaching at area colleges. His family worries that his current research, interrupted by his imprisonment, may go unpublished if he is sent back to Bangladesh.

Another Lawrence teacher, who wished to remain anonymous for this story, said she was shocked to hear of Jamal’s arrest and potential deportation. She has watched Jamal interact with her students, including his two older children, over the years as a parent volunteer. She described the Lawrence father as an enthusiastic classroom volunteer, always “happy” to help with science lessons and STEM-centric extracurriculars.

“I just want to support them, because I think they have some pretty amazing kids, and they’re amazing parents,” the teacher said of Jamal and his family. “He’s a very well-respected scientist who’s done great research. This is exactly the kind of person we want in our community.”

For now, the family is hoping for the best. Attorneys have told Chowdhury there is only a slim chance — just “1 percent,” she said — of the government granting Jamal a stay of removal, which she said would allow Jamal a pathway to permanent residency. Essentially, “if they let us stay a couple years, he will be legal,” Chowdhury said.

But Chowdhury also said her husband could be deported any day now. And it’s weighing heavily on her family. Chowdhury, as a live organ donor, only has one kidney, and she worries about the stress on her body. She worries about her husband, an ethnic minority in his home country who may face prejudice, violence, or even death, she said, if he is sent back to Bangladesh.

And she worries about her children, too — that their education may be interrupted or hindered, that they may suffer lasting consequences with their father gone and their mother already in fragile health.

“It’s going to hurt them very much,” she said. “If I get sick, what will happen to the future of my three American kids?”

How to help:

Those interested can sign the petition at www.Change.org. (Search for “Help to stop the deportation of Syed Jamal.”) Community members are also encouraged to address letters of support to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Mailing and email addresses can be found at www.dhs.gov/direct-contact-information. Letter writers are asked to include Jamal’s case number — 095209456 — in their letters.

Community members are also encouraged to write letters and sign the petition during two events Saturday. The first, from 2 to 3 p.m., will be at Plymouth Congregational Church, 925 Vermont St. The Islamic Center of Lawrence, 1917 Naismith Dr., will host a second session from 4 to 5 p.m.

Comments

Geoff Ermlap 2 weeks, 1 day ago

The real face of an immigrant. Not the false narrative our president promotes that immigrants are gang members on murderous rampages. Deporting people like Syed is not making America great.

Steve Jacob 2 weeks, 1 day ago

If I read a story right in other places, the deportation process started before Trump.

Nathan Anderson 2 weeks, 1 day ago

A study out of the Uni of Arizona concluded that illegal immigrants are twice as likely to commit crime and more likely to commit more serious crimes. Still the exception rather than the rule among illegal immigrants, but something to consider.

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3099992

"Young convicts are especially likely to be undocumented immigrants. While undocumented immigrants from 15 to 35 years of age make up slightly over two percent of the Arizona population, they make up about eight percent of the prison population. Even after adjusting for the fact that young people commit crime at higher rates, young undocumented immigrants commit crime at twice the rate of young U.S. citizens. These undocumented immigrants also tend to commit more serious crimes."

Mike Green 2 weeks, 1 day ago

Many other actual studies , including the Cato Institute, show the opposite, by a wide margin. The study you quote is by a NRA supported blogger using top secret data that he refuses to share, and contradicts all other studies.
There is an epidemic, on both sides of the spectrum, of "bloggers" that are actually industry/political marketing specialists.

Eli Hobbes 1 week, 6 days ago

A friend who lives in CA and another who lives in AZ say those studies do reflect what they see in their cities (LA and Phoenix).

Kendall Simmons 1 week, 6 days ago

So your friends spend all their lives driving through their cities, compiling statistics, checking documentation regarding legal vs illegal presence in the USA, and other pertinent activities???

For some odd reason I have my doubts that your friends "see" much of anything about this issue. That they are just expressing their strongly held OPINIONS. That maybe, just maybe, what they see is "brown" or hear "foreign-sounding" names. But, hey, that's just my opinion.

P.S. Maybe if we made it easier for young folks to get jobs, there would be less emphasis on committing crimes?

Steve Johnson 2 weeks, 1 day ago

You never know! Tell that to families who have been victimized by illegal immigrants
They should outline a program that fast tracks him legally since it seems he is a good person who has and is contributing to society

Eli Hobbes 1 week, 6 days ago

@Geoff. That depends on where you look. In my life illegal immigrants are the roofers, fast food workers, kitchen workers @ chain restaurants, etc... Working as a medic for many years most the the Latinos that I encountered were decent people. Two other people that I know and who's judgment I find to be reasonable live in AZ and Southern California. They're experiences are 180 degrees the opposite. In LA I'm told that the issues caused by the illegal Latino is almost as bad as those caused by the people in the urban black areas. That is high crime, high usage of government assistance paid for by the working people in the community. Mr. Jamal sounds like a nice guy. But even nice guys have to follow the rules. You don't get a pass on following the rules based on your good character.

Ken Lassman 2 weeks, 1 day ago

Thanks for the petition link where folks can show their support by putting their names down in support of Syed. I'm unconvinced that deporting Syed is sending any message that would be supported by other immigrants who are "following the rules." I'm also unconvinced that this is helping protect our community from something that is somehow harming us. I AM convinced that this deportation, if it happens WILL cause harm.

These are three big questions that folks who are pushing for locking down our borders simply don't have good answers to. Hurting the individuals, families and the community you are trying to "protect" smacks of favoring ideologies over people and displays a lack of imagination in addressing a problem.

Eli Hobbes 1 week, 6 days ago

Because for every Sayed Jamal you let stay you are depriving an person who is legally in this country from having a job. The process that would allow for a Sayed Jamel would let more than 1 other person who is a drain or hazard to our society to stay as well. That number could be anywhere from 1 to whatever depending on the system used.

The bottom line is that if you haven't followed to the rules to be in the US, you should be removed.

Ken Lassman 1 week, 6 days ago

OK, so his family, which is here legally, will have to do without his financial support, since he won't be able to get a job that makes the kind of money he makes here in Bangladesh and send that money to the family, right? So what will the family do? Instead of the family paying INTO the system and supporting social services, roads and other publicly funded infrastructure and the myriad other governmental services that our taxes pay for, they will be pulling OUT of the system a variety of social services that they will need to get by.

And I don't buy that Sayed is taking away jobs from legal citizens because his brother's startup company is probably bringing in more business to our country than it is taking away from workers looking for jobs who can't find them. The most important change that is occurring because of this potential deportation is that he won't be able to participate actively in his children's lives, help out with the school committees that he is active in, and otherwise actively make our community a better place. It seems that if more folks spent their days like Sayed, our community would be a better place.

Kendall Simmons 1 week, 6 days ago

So can we assume that you're in favor of kicking out all those kids who were brought over as infants and who only speak English, and America is the only home they know...and do this because they haven't followed the rules??

Maybe we should kick out EVERYONE...citizen or not...if they haven't followed the rules?

As an aside, remember what happened in Georgia and Alabama when they stopped using illegals to pick their crops? Yup. The food rotted on the vine and the ground...and the farmers lost tons of money. As a result, those two states changed their minds about "those people stealing jobs from good, hard-working Americans".

Gary Stussie 2 weeks, 1 day ago

Overstaying Visas is pretty big problem. USAToday reported in 2015 that over 500,000 people overstay business and pleasure visas each year.

I think something is missing in the above story! Did Mr. Jamal follow the rules/law? What was the circumstance(s) that shifted him from legal non-immigrant to illegal immigrant?

https://www.uscis.gov/visit-united-states/extend-your-stay

"If you remain in the United States longer than authorized, you may be barred from returning and/or you may be removed (deported) from the United States."

You may apply to extend your stay if:

  • You were lawfully admitted into the United States with a nonimmigrant visa
  • Your nonimmigrant visa status remains valid
  • You have not committed any crimes that make you ineligible for a visa
  • You have not violated the conditions of your admission
  • Your passport is valid and will remain valid for the duration of your stay

We have had both long term Australian and French neighbors who were on work Visas. They had to return to their home of record every 5 years (I believe it was 5 years) and routinely got their visas extended ... still are!.

Ken Lassman 1 week, 6 days ago

So if you eliminate those 500,000 people from our communities, what would our communities look like? My guess is that Sayed's active community involvement is very characteristic of the folks who have overstayed their visas: they are supporting families, they are doing any jobs that come their way quite willingly and with good work ethic, and become integral members of the communities they are a part of. Take them away, and the rest of us will have to start supporting their families who remain, and they will not have two parents to raise them, and on and on.

I'm not saying that the system is working because it isn't. But trying to characterize most of these folks as "the problem" belies the lack of alternatives that our system has afforded these folks who are eager to become citizens. We don't have systems set up with Bangladesh that makes it as easy to get a visa renewed every 5 years like you described for Australia and France, so what are they supposed to do? If it were as easy as you described in your list then don't you think Sayed would have done it? And if it were as easy as you described and he DIDN'T do it, do you think that means he should be deported or just pay a fine for screwing up?

RJ Johnson 2 weeks, 1 day ago

There has to be more to the story than they are telling. He had thirty years to get his U.S. citizenship. ICE does not just show up to your front door without first issuing you a letter ordering you to the immigration office for a hearing on your student visa or green card status. When you fail to show up for the hearing then they come looking for you! After you have been arrested for deportation you have all but ruined your chances of staying in the USA!

Kendall Simmons 1 week, 6 days ago

You obviously haven't been paying attention. ICE most certainly DOES "just show up at your door". And the process for getting citizenship is hard and takes a longer and longer time. And the idea that all you have to do is show up to a promptly scheduled/held hearing with your green card or student visa and you get a hearing is mind-boggling.

A lot of people want to blame others for their own lot in life. Their own decision-making. Their own resentment. The way they vote that shoots giant holes in their feet (and, NO!! I am NOT saying it's only the GOP that is to blame...not even close).

We are becoming an incredibly ignorant country even though we have easy access to differing point of views and opportunities to consider them. But, when you have states and government officials that are trying to keep critical thinking from being taught in schools, we're in big trouble.

RJ Johnson 1 week, 6 days ago

This is the statement from ICE: "Syed Ahmed Jamal, 55, from Bangladesh, initially legally entered the United States in July 1998 on a temporary nonimmigrant visa. After he overstayed that visa, a federal immigration judge allowed him voluntary departure until Aug. 26, 2002. He abided the judge’s order and departed for Bangladesh on July 24, 2002. Three months later, Jamal legally re-entered the United States on Oct. 25, 2002, on a temporary nonimmigrant visa. He again overstayed his visa, and a federal immigration judge allowed him voluntary departure until Oct. 26, 2011. However, Jamal violated the judge’s order and failed to depart the United States, and the voluntary departure order instead became a final order of removal (deportation). Jamal came to ICE’s attention in September 2012 following his arrest on misdemeanor criminal charges at Johnson County (Kansas) Jail. He was taken into ICE custody Sept. 11, 2012. He was released from ICE custody on an order of supervision in November 2012. On May 21, 2013, the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) dismissed Jamal’s appeal of his removal order. To effect this removal order, deportation officers with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) arrested Jamal outside his residence on Jan. 24, 2018. He is currently in ICE custody pending his removal to Bangladesh."

Mike Riner 1 week, 6 days ago

Color me surprised that the MSM neglected to report the whole story!

Bob Smith 2 weeks, 1 day ago

He made his decisions. Now he has to live with the consequences.

Phillip Chappuie 2 weeks, 1 day ago

Certainly a flawed system. But when the guy has been here that long and he appears to be clearly an asset to his community and is contributing to the general welfare, there must and should be some mechanism to mitigate this type of action. Rules aside it is heartless and not necessary to a large degree. One other way that Trump makes America great again is this type of attitude is preventing many, many foreign students and other likes this guy from coming to America in the first place. Anybody want to venture a guess as to the dollar amount this country has missed out on at this point in terms of foreign student tuitions/rents/fees/living/entertainment dollars not spent as well as lost tourism? This kind of deportation is dumb and anti-productive.

Brad Greenwood 2 weeks, 1 day ago

Exactly right! Other administrations would have most likely allowed him to stay because of his contributions to the community, but the Drumpf regime only sees "immigrant".

Gary Stussie 2 weeks, 1 day ago

Laxity on the part of those "other administrations" is the reason soooo many people deliberately scoff the law.

Bob Smith 2 weeks ago

Either you believe in the rule of law or you don't.

Kendall Simmons 1 week, 6 days ago

Don't be silly. Believing in the overarching concept of the rule of law does NOT mean that all laws are just or right. Or even that they should be obeyed.

Want an example? If we had toed the line with "the rule of law", we would never have had an American Revolution and we wouldn't be the United States of America. Are you sure that's what you want?

Nathan Anderson 2 weeks, 1 day ago

In general, I agree. However, from what his brother says in the petition, he's been reporting to ICE for a while but also just had a baby. If he knows he could be deported at any time, why have a baby to exacerbate the situation?

Eli Hobbes 1 week, 6 days ago

Look at other areas of the justice system. A person who has been a fugitive for 30 years or even 5 but has lived a good clean life still has to answer for their past crimes or the accusations of it. It should be no different in these cases.

Rich Noever 2 weeks, 1 day ago

Yes it sounds like he just blew it off. Why didn't he apply for US citizenship? Sounds like he intended to stay here. You reap what you sow.

John Brazelton 2 weeks, 1 day ago

No one should feel sorry for this individual. He's had 30 years to find a way to become legal and apparently, he's done very little in that area. This is what happens when administration after administration doesn't enforce immigration law. Then you have situations where someone who willingly violated the law becomes a big sob story for the media to cover. It's his fault and only his fault!

Norm Jennings 2 weeks, 1 day ago

Never broke a rule in YOUR life? Enjoying the fact that the children of this man are going have their lives turned upside-down? Call yourself Christian much? Hopefully not.

Unless you're native American - your background is that of an immigrant, and their contributions to what actually makes America great are worth so much more than the thinly-veiled hate-speak I see in many of these posts.

I've heard of "fake news," but now everyone can see FAKE American values with their own eyes.

Gary Stussie 2 weeks, 1 day ago

"your background is that of an immigrant".

Not the issue Norm ... legal immigrants are the backbone and strength of this nation. Illegal immigration puts the immigrant at a perpetual disadvantage and is a drain on the country's resources.

https://cis.org/Impact-Immigration-California By 1995, California accounted for 12.1 percent of the country's population and 32.7 percent of the nation's immigrants.

I am of the opinion that getting immigration under control does not suggest one has Fake American Values.

Norm Jennings 1 week, 6 days ago

Gary, appreciate the lucid discussion. My reason for believing that is does, is because in my opinion the system is so convoluted, expensive, etc. (and I won't believe anyone that denies this even knows someone that has had to negotiate it), that we make criminals of true contributors. While those who may have contributed little, but exercise their constitutional rights to sow anger, division, and fear. Legal? Yes. Christian? Not to me. Racist? Almost certainly in many cases, and legal or otherwise, not what true American values mean to me. If your of the opinion is that manpower and money that ICE is spending on this effort is better spent than having "control" of well-known, multinational. criminal, drug enterprises than you'll have to pardon my skepticism about the validity of the point of legitimate and protective defense of a citizenry by a government. When no one recognizes the names of those enterprises, than maybe I'll listen more to the idea that ICE has any business arresting middle-aged professors.

Bob Summers 2 weeks, 1 day ago

30 years to become a citizen and didn't?

Where is the science behind that thinking?

RJ Johnson 2 weeks, 1 day ago

This is the statement from ICE:

"Syed Ahmed Jamal, 55, from Bangladesh, initially legally entered the United States in July 1998 on a temporary nonimmigrant visa. After he overstayed that visa, a federal immigration judge allowed him voluntary departure until Aug. 26, 2002. He abided the judge’s order and departed for Bangladesh on July 24, 2002. Three months later, Jamal legally re-entered the United States on Oct. 25, 2002, on a temporary nonimmigrant visa. He again overstayed his visa, and a federal immigration judge allowed him voluntary departure until Oct. 26, 2011. However, Jamal violated the judge’s order and failed to depart the United States, and the voluntary departure order instead became a final order of removal (deportation).

Jamal came to ICE’s attention in September 2012 following his arrest on misdemeanor criminal charges at Johnson County (Kansas) Jail. He was taken into ICE custody Sept. 11, 2012. He was released from ICE custody on an order of supervision in November 2012. On May 21, 2013, the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) dismissed Jamal’s appeal of his removal order.

To effect this removal order, deportation officers with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) arrested Jamal outside his residence on Jan. 24, 2018. He is currently in ICE custody pending his removal to Bangladesh."

Hudson Luce 2 weeks, 1 day ago

In other words, he should have been deported five years ago, following dismissal of his appeal. He overstayed two visas, and in the final case, ended up with a final order of removal. It appears he had no respect for or intent to follow the immigration laws, and potentially also to not abide by the criminal statutes - I've seen nothing about any conviction on the misdemeanor charge. I feel sorry for his wife and family, but he had plenty of time to abide by the law, get a green card, and get citizenship. It was his choice and he screwed it up.

Julie Eklund 2 weeks ago

As much as he sounds like a really nice guy with a nice family, the fact is he has violated the terms of his Visa.

Previously he has complied with those terms, returned to his home country, reapplied for a visa and was able to return to the U.S. What's different now that makes him no longer willing to abide by the terms of his visa?

All the nice guy/nice family in the world does not change the fact that he has broken the law.

Rosemary Morris 2 weeks ago

And petitioners for him are asking for money.

Bob Reinsch 2 weeks ago

Flipping through the new testament, trying to find that "deport the brown people" parable...

Scott Burkhart 2 weeks ago

You might google, "Render unto Caesar what is Caesar's...." and start there. Every sovereign nation has a rights to defend its laws. This is a terrible situation, no argument. The ones being hurt the most are his children. It is horribly unfair to them but who put them in this situation. Not the U.S. Government but their father. He broke immigration laws. An ordered society expects its government to enforce its laws. If he had embezzled or committed some other "white collar" crime, he would be subject to jail time and the separation from his children would be no less awful. Why should we as a nation be expected to adjust the immigration laws on a case by case basis? Why can't legal immigrants, that agree to the terms and conditions of their temporary visas, be expected to abide by those terms and conditions?

kathy white 2 weeks ago

I wish I could disagree with you but sadly cannot. I am a citizen and I have to abide by the laws or suffer the consequences. This sadly appears to be a case of willful negligence and lack of follow through. It is a sad situation for all involved.

Bob Smith 2 weeks ago

The laws of the United States aren't contained in the Bible.

Gary Stussie 2 weeks ago

Disappointing but typical liberal response ... support the rule of law and you are a racist ... advocate for secure boarders and you are a racist ... disagree with the lefties and you are a racist. Getting old Bob!

Brock Masters 1 week, 6 days ago

It is ironic that Mexico embraces the very things the Democrats say are racist - voter ID, a border wall and strong enforcement against illegal immigration. Darn that racist nation.

Cathy Ackerman 2 weeks ago

So much misinformation here from people who have zero experience trying to deal with the US immigration system. It is complicated, full of conflicting information, and next to impossible to navigate in many cases without a team of lawyers - that most can’t afford.

Gary Stussie 2 weeks ago

Cathy, if you have come here illegally, your comment is probably right on ... as I pointed out above, if you are on a visa and follow some pretty simple rules, I do not believe "team of lawyers" are ever necessary.

Eli Hobbes 1 week, 6 days ago

Gary, your right. I know a recent immigrant from the UK. The process took years but he got through it without lawyers.

Kendall Simmons 1 week, 6 days ago

Ears, Eli. It took YEARS. Just how many are we talking about?

David Holroyd 2 weeks ago

If the democrats would get with Trump's 12 year plan this dude could stay. It's the fact.

I have to have a PASSPORT to go to Mexico.

I have to have a passport to go to France and can't just hang out there for 30years..

Kendall Simmons 1 week, 6 days ago

Have you actually read "Trump's 12 year plan"? Of course not. Why do I say that? Because, if you had, you'd realize it clearly only applies to DREAMERS, i.e. kids who came as children. And THAT is "the fact"...not the "I want to win this argument" wishful thinking nonsense you spouted.

Another FACT you got wrong? You proclaimed that "I have to have a PASSPORT to go to Mexico". That is NOT true!!

If you're a US citizen and you fly in, then yes. You need a passport. But! If you drive in, for example, you do NOT need a passport. You can use an enhanced driver's license, or a SENTRI card, or a FAST card. But you didn't know that and, like with the "12 year plan", you were so convinced you knew all about these that you didn't bother checking the FACTS.

Brock Masters 1 week, 6 days ago

I went back to the article after reading the ICE statement. The press wonders why they are not trusted and accused of spreading fake news, well here is an example of why.

The reporter wrote, “Jamal has no criminal record in Douglas County.”. Yes, technically this is a true statement, but they omitted his criminal record in Johnson county. Sloppy reporting or omitted to make Jamal’s case more sympathetic?

Kendall Simmons 1 week, 6 days ago

The reporter was reporting the FACTS in a Lawrence, KS newspaper. Just because you don't happen to like a FACT doesn't mean it's not true. So don't proclaim that this was sloppy reporting or fake news. Or even that it was done deliberately to help the guy.

The reporter reported a FACT. But you don't like it, so YOU treat it like "fake news". And we wonder why we're worried about our country's future.

(Hint: The rule of law would have accepted that having no criminal record in Douglas County meant that he has no criminal record in Douglas County. Period. And your trying to read more into it than is factually appropriate would have been rejected. Hmmm.)

Brock Masters 1 week, 5 days ago

I said it was a fact, but it wasn’t the complete story about this man.

The fact that he was arrested in Johnson county is material to the story and should have been included.

It changes the entire narrative of the story from a man with no criminal record to one of him coming to the attention of ICE because he was arrested for a crime.

Armen Kurdian 1 week, 6 days ago

LJW - this is irresponsible journalism, slanted, and intentionally omits facts. Not only that, you actually have the audacity to include links to a petition to help him, without ANY mention of his failure to comply with lawful orders and the repeated chances he has been given.

This is why people don't trust the media anymore.

David Holroyd 1 week, 6 days ago

If you drive into Mexico KENDALL SIMMONS one needs a passport! Check you facts, but then you were too busy getting your house painted during the Big Event.

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