Archive for Thursday, April 19, 2018

Kansas attorney general files school finance bill with Kansas Supreme Court, asks for adjustment to schedule

Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt tells the House Judiciary Committee that he thinks it's time the voters of Kansas have an opportunity to reconsider the school finance language in Article 6 of the Kansas Constitution, Monday, April 2, 2018.

Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt tells the House Judiciary Committee that he thinks it's time the voters of Kansas have an opportunity to reconsider the school finance language in Article 6 of the Kansas Constitution, Monday, April 2, 2018.

April 19, 2018

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Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt on Thursday filed the newest version of the state's school finance bill with the state Supreme Court, two days after Gov. Jeff Colyer signed the bill into law, Schmidt's office announced in a release.

As part of the filing, Schmidt also asked the court to adjust its schedule for brief filings in the case, as legislators still have to fix an error in the original legislation that undercut expenditures by $80 million. Initial briefs in the case are due April 30 and second briefs are due by May 10, but since the legislature is not due to re-convene until April 26, Schmidt asked the court to focus only on the equity of the funding proposed in the bill for the first brief filings. He requested the court wait until the May 10 deadline to begin examining the adequacy of the funding amount.

“This slightly modified schedule would allow the Court to maintain the May 22, 2018 oral argument date while avoiding the very real potential of adequacy briefs filed April 30 being overcome by subsequent legislative action,” Schmidt wrote in the court filing.

Comments

Richard Heckler 1 month ago

Are conservatives still trying to cut Kansas Public education short?

BY WHAT authority did the Kansas Legislature ever have that supported less money for Kansas Public Education? By them cutting taxes more than they taxes should have been cut?

Do they know math or not?

Could they not understand how much money would be required to follow Kansas Constitutional demands for public education?

The fundamental equation was never changed. So does that mean that the lions share of Republicans have been breaking the law?

Cindy Wallace 1 month ago

Part of their plan in the push for privitization!

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