Archive for Thursday, April 9, 2015

Lawrence community continues to offer feedback on Ninth Street Corridor project

April 9, 2015

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For the second time this week, the Ninth Street Corridor Project's design team hosted a public workshop for community members to offer their two cents on the unfolding project.

Thursday night, about 75 people gathered in New York Elementary School to discuss the role of public art in the renovation project, which plans to transform a seven-block stretch of Ninth Street reaching from the Warehouse Arts District near Delaware Street west to Massachusetts Street.

Susan Tate, CEO of the Lawrence Arts Center, pins up a note on a map of Ninth Street at Thursday night's public art workshop.

Susan Tate, CEO of the Lawrence Arts Center, pins up a note on a map of Ninth Street at Thursday night's public art workshop.

Once again, the crowd was split into three rotating groups, given a large map and assigned to write either connections, talents or myths regarding the stretch of Ninth Street. The purpose of the exercise was to give the design team ideas about how to mix public art and functionality along the corridor in a way that remains true to the East Lawrence neighborhood.

Resident Dayna Carleton took her time carefully writing several local talents on notecards and connecting them to Ninth Street with a push pin and bit of red string. On one of her note cards, she scrawled the name of a neighbor with "spider expert" underneath.

"There are all these hidden treasures in East Lawrence," she said. "People don't realize there are all these incredible resources."

Design team member Tristan Surtees stood quietly back for a portion of the evening, watching the groups interact and share their stories, talents and connections.

Surtees said each bit of information shared with him and the rest of the team brings them one step closer to fully imagining the project.

"The experience we've had so far and the warmth with which we've been welcomed is exactly what we require," he said to the crowd early in the meeting.

Not only have the public workshops given Carleton an opportunity to share what's important to her, she said, but it's also been an enjoyable experience and she plans to attend more of the meetings.

"It has been fun," she said. "Whether or not our input is used, I had a good time."

Josh Shelton, also of the design team, said it still isn't clear what the final product will look like. Rather, the team is still in the process of collecting information.

"It's a discovery based project. And I think they're trying to tease things out," he said. "That's the wonderful thing about artists is they work differently from engineers or architects. It's an intuitive process."

The next public art workshop will be April 20 at New York Elementary School from 7 to 9:30 p.m.

A full schedule and more information can be found at lawrenceks.org/9th-street-corridor-project.

Comments

David Holroyd 2 years, 9 months ago

Of the 75 how many actually reside or own property.?

Deduct the design team and those professional meeting goers that go anyplace. How many then?

Janet Cinelli 2 years, 9 months ago

That doesn't seem relevant. Are you suggesting that only property owners deserve a say? What if the property owner lives off Folks Road and the person at the meeting has rented and lived in the same East Lawrence home for the last 20 years? Still no say, says you?

Richard Heckler 2 years, 9 months ago

Why would anyone want city government to artificially increase the assessed value of a home which really does not represent market value? Can we say another back door tax increase?

Who wants to pay more taxes to live in their home? Is this potential tax increase a legitimate concern to any homeowner.... I would think so.

The neighborhood is setting up some fiscally responsible standards and demands for respect that could apply to all residents throughout this community. Think about this should city hall and developers show up in YOUR neighborhood with a tax dollar subsidized concept.

Developers should not be the guidelines for new growth in a neighborhood. They may cost taxpayers too much money thus economic growth never takes place.

If the project is done hastily,without substance and without creativity this project may in fact decrease residential market values. Market value is never known until a property is sold ---- until such time it is pure speculation aka a tool to increase taxes.

Shouldn't this endeavor pay for itself? Speculation is not enough.

Andy Anderson 2 years, 9 months ago

You mean like the overpriced Library pays for itself?

Richard Heckler 2 years, 9 months ago

That was put to a vote and the greater majority of voters decided it was a project worth their tax dollars.

The Rec Center should have been put to the test. This sewage plant should be put to the test.

David Holroyd 2 years, 9 months ago

Read my words!

How many reside or own property. I did not say reside and own there. Yes, you can live off folks rd and go to the meeting because you own something there.

Deduct the design team and staff and the professional meeting goers and what is the total?,

I now see why the Journal World is to write to the eight grade level.....but it appears it needs to be lowered.

I guess this is why the 50 million dollar sewer plant is of no interest, because it does not have a dog path.

John Kyle 2 years, 9 months ago

I don't see how the Journal World's "is to writing" to the "eight grade level' has anything to do with dog paths at a sewer plant

David Holroyd 2 years, 9 months ago

I would like to see an electronic billboard or several where the numbers pop up hourly to show the debt incurred by the city and how much it costs per day. Wouldn't that be fun! The Electronic Debt Billboard viewing would be a Destination. Maybe even include a few salaries and names of staff. We want to be transparent!

Maybe install it on the "walkway of the arts" with some comfy benches made of recycled pastic bottles and umbrellas suspended by helium balloons to keep the sun off those seated. Always want to make sure to keep the rustics in the dark you know!

David Holroyd 2 years, 9 months ago

Mr Kyle are there to be dog paths? The only thing this community gets excited is about dogs and walking trails. Public projects are of no interest, the last being rock Chalk park .

Why is there no one interested in this proposed 50 million to be spent on a sewer plant?

Apparently if there were to be included in the plan, a dog walkway, the rustics get interested.

You got a dog? If so , should there be striped lanes? Poodles in the pink lane, great Danes in the blue lane, and so forth.

Maybe this walkway of the arts could have color coded sidewalks as it meanders through decades of gentrification.

John Kyle 2 years, 9 months ago

Shouldn't you be posting this in the article about the sewage plant? I have no idea what you are talking about. Colored lanes for dog paths?

Phil Minkin 2 years, 9 months ago

As I understand, this is a project that will affect the WHOLE community just as decisions about downtown or a bypass. I hope all citizens of Lawrence take part in the discussion, not just residents or property owners.

David Holroyd 2 years, 9 months ago

Sure, lanes designated by color so that each breed of dog has it's own lane OR have color coded walks on town so that each strata if income has its own lane.

Mr Minkin, if this a project that affects the WHOLE community then CadreLawrence needs to send a representative. Take a look back at the Journal World article dated July 18, 2012

Richard Heckler 2 years, 9 months ago

After the initial spending of $50 million tax dollars for the sewage plant what follows will continue to shake down the tax taxpayers. Tens of millions if not 100's of millions which essentially becomes billions of non stop tax dollar spending to support homes and retail that which never pay for themselves. I believe this is known as over extending.

http://www.sierraclub.org/sprawl/report00/intro.asp

How does reckless spending of tax $$$$$ improve our quality of life?

Yes it has been determined that residential does not pay for itself due to the long long list of tax dollar services we taxpayers seem to want or perhaps someone thinks we taxpayers want this long list of services.

Richard Heckler 2 years, 9 months ago

Definition of 'General Obligation Bond - GO' A municipal bond backed by the credit and "taxing power" of the issuing jurisdiction rather than the revenue from a given project.

Investopedia explains 'General Obligation Bond - GO' General obligation bonds are issued with the belief that a municipality will be able to repay its debt obligation through taxation or revenue from projects. No assets are used as collateral.

http://bonds.about.com/od/munibonds/a/The-Difference-Between-General-Obligation-And-Revenue-Bonds.htm

http://news.morningstar.com/classroom2/course.asp?docid=5384&page=2

Richard Heckler 2 years, 9 months ago

Developers should not be the guidelines for new growth in a neighborhood. They may cost taxpayers too much money thus economic growth never takes place. And developers are always in a fast track mode which is not healthy when fiscal responsibility is of great concern.

If the 9th Street project is done hastily,without substance and without creativity this project may in fact decrease residential market values. Market value is never known until a property is sold ---- until such time it is pure speculation aka a tool to increase taxes.

Shouldn't this endeavor pay for itself? Speculation is not enough.

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