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Archive for Saturday, January 11, 2014

100 years ago: KU dance chaperone warns students against ‘dancing with both arms around your partner’

January 11, 2014

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From the Lawrence Daily Journal-World for Jan. 11, 1914:

  • "The new dances and the situation that has arisen in Lawrence in connection with the new dances at the University parties brought forth a condemnation of some of the new steps from the pulpit of the First Methodist church yesterday morning. Dr. H. E. Wolfe in the course of his sermon deplored the tendency of the young people to take up the new steps and spoke in favor of strict supervision of the parties given by and for University folks.... 'As soon as someone introduces a new dance, no matter what the nature of it is, everyone seems ready to throw away his morality and sense of decency and take it up.'... A somewhat unexpected halt to the latest steps and position in vogue at recent University dances was called at the College dance at the F. A. A. Hall Saturday night when Prof. W. H. Twenhofel, chaperon, announced before the music started that dancers that night must observe some limitations. 'I don't care what you dance,' declared Prof. Twenhofel, 'so long as you can do it in a proper manner. But this business of dancing with both arms around your partner will not be allowed. I won't have any hugging on the floor tonight.' This announcement was greeted with gasps of astonishment, giggles and slight applause. Prof. Twenhofel is known as a capital jokester among the students. But some of the dancers soon discovered that he was not joking and that he expected to use his authority as chaperon.... Walking up to a couple who had failed to regard his warning to dance with one arm extended, he said, 'Don't hug that girl in the light. Wait until after the dance.'"
  • "Miss Peet who will have charge of the Journal-World Cooking School in Y. M. C. A. Auditorium next week, says housekeeping is a science and a most important one. She says it is more far reaching in its effect than almost any other science attracting the attention of the world today. She says the term 'domestic science' frightens some people but that it means nothing more nor less than home science, and that this means simply running the home on a successful scientific basis, in a way which makes for less friction and more happiness.... Miss Peet says, 'Everywhere I go I find women interested in better homes and better cooking. There are people who say all women care about nowadays is dress and society and the latest dance and such things, but I have proven many time that this is not true. Wherever I lecture, crowds of women come out every day in the effort to learn how to keep house better, how to make their homes better, and how to provide wholesome nourishing food for their families. I intend to show Lawrence women how to set a good table, at a minimum of expense by getting the most nutritious foods and preparing them in such a way to get the most value out of them.'... But she says the woman who is to be a real helpmeet must have some interests outside of the kitchen. She must save some of her time and thought for the topics of the day which are interesting her husband and growing sons and daughters if she is to hold their love and respect."

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