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Archive for Saturday, October 26, 2013

40 years ago: KBI called in on another Ottawa-area slaying

October 26, 2013

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From the Lawrence Daily Journal-World for Oct. 26, 1973:

The Kansas Bureau of Investigation was called in today to help local law enforcement officials in the case of another mysterious slaying in the Ottawa area. 80-year-old farmer J. W. Schoonover had been found shot to death while sitting on a tractor in the machine shed on his farm about five miles southwest of Ottawa. Schoonover and his son in August had discovered and reported a decomposed body in one of the farm's hayfields; the victim in that case had turned out to be a nurse, Mrs. Wilma Jean Willoughby, who had been missing since July 19 and whose car had been found burning in a field in Lenexa. That slaying was still unsolved, as was the earlier triple homicide of Mrs. Hazel Avery of Lawrence, her son Steven Avery of Iola, and Gary Longfellow of Lawrence, whose bodies had been found on March 29 shot to death in a car parked about three miles from the Schoonover farm. Another body had been discovered on April 18 near Garnett in Anderson County, about 25 miles south of Ottawa; the investigation in that case had stalled when authorities had received no response to their publicized description of the victim, a young man of about 18. Authorities were still considering the possibility that a hitchhiker might have been responsible for the various deaths, as I-35 and U.S. Hwy. 59 connected all the points involved.

Comments

Ron Holzwarth 1 year, 1 month ago

People are not always what they seem to be, and some of the most trustworthy looking individuals are the last people you should ever trust, especially if you have just met them.

For instance, from the web:
"John Douglas, a former chief of the FBI's Elite Serial Crime Unit and author of "Mind Hunter," says, "A very conservative estimate is that there are between 35 and 50 active serial killers in the United States" at any given time."

This is an interesting article from Australia about psychopaths, and well worth the time to read:
http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/relationships/how-to-pick-psychopaths-among-us/story-fnet0he2-1226563257214

There is one almost surefire way to distinguish psychopaths and sociopaths from more trustworthy people, and that is to get to know something about their friends. People with those personality traits almost never form long term friendships, because that is not important to them. The maximum length of time of one of their friendships will be about six months, because by then they've burned the people they know in one way or another. So, if someone you know has many friends that they have been friends with for decades, they don't have those problems and can probably be trusted.

The total lack of emotion and remorse is an alien concept for most people, and that's why so many people become victims of people they have just met.

I have interacted with two psychopaths and one borderline case in my lifetime that I know of. In one case, I was very lucky to survive, and in the other case I was merely broken into and robbed by someone that I considered to be a friend. But, there were surely many more that I was casually acquainted with. I just wasn't chosen to be one of their victims.

"12 Million Americans Are Sociopaths."
http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2012/08/as-many-as-12-million-americans-are-sociopaths.html

",,, there are among us, roughly 3 million psychopaths."
This site also notes this: "by the best estimates, there are only 100 to 500 serial killers in the United States." That certainly conflicts with the number above.
http://www.psinvestigates.com/Psychopath%20At%20Work,%20Home%20and%20Play.htm

You need to always be very careful with who you trust. Your life and the lives of others may depend on it.

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