Archive for Monday, March 25, 2013

Okla. woman committed to mental health facility in desecration case involving former Lawrence woman

March 25, 2013


Oklahoma mug shot of Shelly D. Maytubby.

Oklahoma mug shot of Shelly D. Maytubby.

The prosecution of an Oklahoma woman, charged with desecrating the body of a former Lawrence woman, has been suspended after an Oklahoma judge committed the woman to a psychiatric facility.

Shelly D. Maytubby was charged with desecration of a human corpse after police found her mother's body wrapped in a sheet in Maytubby's garage in Eufaula, Okla., in November.

Maytubby's mother, Erlene McCune, 79, was signed out of The Windsor assisted living facility in Lawrence in September, two months before her body was discovered. McCune suffered from dementia.

In November, McCune's family contacted Oklahoma police, concerned about the woman.

Police questioned Maytubby, who told them her mother had run off with a truck driver named "Santa Claus." Police continued to investigate, finding McCune's body. Police said they also found $12,000 at Maytubby's home, which raised suspicions that Maytubby may have been financially exploiting her mother.

A judge last week ordered Maytubby to the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services after finding that she was not competent to stand trial on the charges, which carry a maximum penalty of seven years in prison. However, the prosecution of Maytubby could resume after treatment.

Lawrence crime, fire, courts coverage
Have a tip?
Contact Journal-World reporter Caitlin Doornbos:


Clark Coan 2 years, 8 months ago

Perhaps the WRAP program could have prevented this if this woman had gotten help in school from a therapist. The Bert Nash Center insert in today's Journal-World discusses the WRAP program and how it can possibly prevent tragedies such as Newtown. The problem is they need $1 million annually to put therapists in all of the schools. It would seem like USD 497 could provide $333,000; the City of Lawrence $333,000 and a Kansas health foundation $334,000. But it will take a major lobbying effort and political will.

Currahee 2 years, 8 months ago

The problem with your statement is that it would be hard to correlate data from a prevention program that targets a very specific population in a specific geographical area. The data shows that crime rates have been steadily decreasing throughout the decades and that asking, "How could we have prevented this" is utterly a non-problem. You will always have abberants in society who do horrible things but no matter how much you shove money into the problem they will never go away. Accepting that is reality.

msezdsit 2 years, 8 months ago

..."You will always have abberants in society who do horrible things but no matter how much you shove money into the problem they will never go away."

So lets do nothing for those who don't fit your narrow minded point of view. Even if we don't help all of them, helping those we can is worth it for public safety.

Commenting has been disabled for this item.