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Archive for Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Republican budget writers propose 4 percent across-the-board cut to higher education

March 12, 2013

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— Republicans on the House Appropriations Committee approved a 4 percent cut in state funding to higher education. The proposed reduction would total $29.2 million, including a cut at Kansas University of nearly $10 million.

Rep. Ward Cassidy, R-St. Francis, who proposed the cut from Gov. Sam Brownback's plan, said it would help balance the state budget. "This will give us some money to work with," Cassidy said.

He said he hoped that at the end of this legislative session, lawmakers can review whether additional money is available for higher education.

"There is a lot of pain with this cut," said Rep. Jerry Henry of Atchison, who is the ranking Democrat on the committee.

He said such a cut would cause higher tuition increases, price some graduating seniors from access to post-secondary education, and hurt economic development.

When Cassidy first proposed the 4 percent cut, Rep. Barbara Ballard, D-Lawrence, tried to reduce it to a 2 percent cut, but her effort failed.

Republican leaders are trying to craft a state spending plan that doesn't factor in revenue in Brownback’s tax plan because that plan has not gained acceptance in the Legislature yet.

Brownback, a Republican, has proposed reducing individual state income tax rates during the next four years but keeping the state sales tax at 6.3 percent. Under current law, the sales tax rate is supposed to decrease to 5.7 percent on July 1. Brownback also has proposed eliminating homeowner deductions for mortgage interest and real estate taxes.

Tim Caboni, KU's vice chancellor for public affairs, said such a cut, as proposed in Appropriations, "really jeopardizes the role we play in fueling economic growth and development in the state."

A 4 percent cut would equal $5.48 million at KU and $4.28 million at the KU Medical Center for a total of $9.76 million. It would put state funding at KU below 2006 levels.

Asked whether the reduction would impact tuition rates, Caboni said, "There is an absolute relationship between a level of state support and tuition increases." He noted that state funding per student has decreased 40 percent since 1999.

Caboni said if the 4 percent cut were instituted, KU would look at ways to reduce expenses. "We have been so good at reducing our business expenses. The question is: How much more can you cut without having to cut the core functions of the institution," he said.

Comments

Richard Heckler 1 year, 1 month ago

I say cut republican pay by 20% -50% for negligence and fraud. All of this nonsense is coming from the Halls of ALEC being fed to some rather ignorant legislators.

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Stain 1 year, 1 month ago

The pay for professional positions is lousy at KU compared to the private sector.

The classes are huge, the advising horrible, too many classes are taught by students instead of professors or some kind of Ph.D.

Wages have been frozen for years already.

KU has hit rock bottom. They cannot exist forever on just their sports.

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Fatty_McButterpants 1 year, 1 month ago

People complain about roads, police services, tuition increases, and on and on, but heaven forbid you actually expect them to pay taxes that will finance the means by which their complaints will be fixed. That's just crazy talk!

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reality_check79 1 year, 1 month ago

As you sit here blaming republicans for everything please remember the 1000's of federal employees Obama is laying off or forcing to work shorter weeks making it impossible to make ends meet, or the soldiers who lose tuition assistance while watching illegal immigrants receive financial aid... What's wrong with America is that we sit here blaming one party!!! It wasn't one party that got this country in this mess, it was all of us!!! The govt. has convinced us that we have to be defined by one party or another instead of doing what we know to be morally right!!

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William Weissbeck 1 year, 1 month ago

I thought the state under our esteemed leadership was on a growth path. That to make our state even more attractive than it already is to out of state businesses and people, we would be increasing funding to education at all levels to show what our priorities are.

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grammaddy 1 year, 1 month ago

Did you really expect anything different in Koch-run Brownbackistan? There's no money in educating our youth.

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IKU57 1 year, 1 month ago

This is like the federal sequestration. There is a slight decrease in the annual increase of money going to government employees in the state government school system.

Will the world come to an end, like the federal sequestration fear mongering from some government officials claimed? Probably not. Brownback may need to take a page of Obama's campaign play book and dazzle the state with a "charm" offensive.

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msezdsit 1 year, 1 month ago

republicans, the crumbling blocks of society. Four percent here four percent there and the next thing you know, we have the foundation for going head to head with the third world countries. Now that does't mean that some people won't be doing quite well in the republicans dream world, just not the poor and the new poor, formerly the middle class.

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Gotland 1 year, 1 month ago

Tap into the endowment. Speaking of the rich, how much money do they have a biillion? These schools have become greedy tax shelters.

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2002 1 year, 1 month ago

Full disclosure: I have a degree from KU. I am not employed in education. I am a Republican.

The single most important aspect of good economic development is a well educated work force. This includes, Universities, community colleges and trade schools. To reduce the funding of State schools is idiotic. It exactly the opposite of what this State needs. The current group of Republicans in this state are destroying it. Starting with the governor, they are short sighted, ignorant and have no plan for moving forward. There are examples of colleges in nearby states that are finding ways to create incentives for out of state students to be brought in at favorable tuition rates in an effort to encourage relocation to the region. In Kansas, we chase them away.

In the past few years, I have spent a lot of time in California where they have a terrible governor and legislature. Democrats that are running the State into the ground. Kansas is the example of the Republicans doing the exact same thing.

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Don Brennaman 1 year, 1 month ago

Come on Barbara give them what they want. Introduce an amendment to cut spending by 100%. Fight ridiculous with ridicule.

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Dave Trabert 1 year, 1 month ago

FYI, annual spending for all universities and the Board of Regents is at http://www.kansasopengov.org/StateGovernment/AgencySpending/AllFundsSpendingbyAgency/tabid/1586/Default.aspx Total spending for all entities increased about 33.5% between 2005 and 2012, or twice the rate of inflation for Midwest Urban Cities (16.3%). Not sure how much might be accounted for by enrollment changes.

Regent universities' 2012 payroll listing is also at http://www.kansasopengov.org/StateGovt/PayListings/tabid/792/Default.aspx

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toe 1 year, 1 month ago

KU does not need the money. The athletic department is soaking up donations and gifts just fine. Academics are a low priority.

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question4u 1 year, 1 month ago

Kansas doesn't have a top-100 university, but that shouldn't matter. If businesses want to locate in states that do, there isn't much competition, just:

Utah, Alabama, South Carolina, Minnesota, Louisiana, Iowa, Delaware, Colorado, Oklahoma, Washington, Vermont, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Connecticut, New York, Illinois, California, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, Maryland, Missouri, Rhode Island, Texas, Indiana, Tennessee, Georgia, Washington, DC, Virginia, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin, Florida

Nebraska also has a higher ranked university than any in Kansas, which makes a grand slam for bordering states. But why should Kansas have a university as good as those in Missouri, Oklahoma, Colorado, or Nebraska anyway?

KU is already ranked lower than universities in 33 states and Washington, DC, so why should it matter if another round of cuts drops KU even lower. Idaho, Alaska, and Wyoming aren't bad company when you're trying to impress prospective businesses with your educated workforce.

Why shouldn't the legislature cut funding to higher ed, drop KU further in the rankings, and make tuition more expensive for Kansas students. Less access to and lower quality of education are to be expected in a third-world state.

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Stain 1 year, 1 month ago

Do they think this will make people want to come and work in Kansas?

We are becoming a laughing stock when it comes to education.

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jaydocky 1 year, 1 month ago

If KU and KUMC are no longer state funded, there will be no preference in admissions for in state students. This would kill the mission of KUMC to train physicians for Kansas, especially rural Kansas.

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Scut Farkus 1 year, 1 month ago

Why do I feel like this has Koch brothers written all over it. Republicans have never been fond of supporting education but this is getting ridiculous. If you want your children to receive a quality, affordable education I would recommend moving to another state.

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rtwngr 1 year, 1 month ago

To quote Barack Obama; "We won."

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L7 1 year, 1 month ago

Higher education will not be necessary in the new brown Kansas. Education will disqualify workers for available jobs.

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consumer1 1 year, 1 month ago

I am still trying to choke down the statement that Barbara Ballard actually did something!!!

1

lawrenceguy40 1 year, 1 month ago

4% is a start, but the goal should be removing all State funding from KU.

Nearly all the best universities are privately funded.

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Lane Signal 1 year, 1 month ago

That's just what the rich are doing. They don't think they have enough cash, so they are buying elections and politicians and stacking the odds. It's not that those who have little are not working hard for their money, it is that the game is rigged. In the US, the top 1% earn 25% of the income and have over 40% of the wealth. The bottom 80% of the population have less than 8% of the wealth. The tax code continues to be manipulated to facilitate the rich taking a higher and higher percentage of the wealth. The rich are "earning" money by buying influence to change laws and policies. We need to change the laws to stop favoring wealth accumulation. The rich don't pay as much tax as the middle class. I'm sure you will argue that the rich do pay their fair share, but if you look at the tax rate on total earnings (no just "income") it is obvious that the rich pay a lower percentage rate. Brownie's new policies are designed to further favor the wealthy and make up for the shortfall by effectively raising rates on the lower and middle classes.

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Cant_have_it_both_ways 1 year, 1 month ago

At least it shows he's a little self conscious about stealing all the money from the poor, middle class and upper middle class to give it to the obscenely rich.

The other way around would read ....conscious about stealing all the money from the rich and give it to the poor, middle class and upper middle class...or in other words those who did not earn it.

If you don't have enough cash to do what you want, you do something about it...don't complain that life has passed you by.

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Lane Signal 1 year, 1 month ago

More political games were Brownie makes a stand for higher education then has his troops in the legislature take a machete to the higher education budget. More tax cuts for the wealthy and less money to support education. At least it shows he's a little self conscious about stealing all the money from the poor, middle class and upper middle class to give it to the obscenely rich. For a while there it looked like he thought stealing all the money for the rich was something he should be proud of.

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